Bravo Announces Casting Call For The Untitled Art Project

by Art Fag City on June 30, 2009 · 146 comments Newswire


White Columns Executive Director and artist Matthew Higgs.

More than a year after announcing the development of a new reality show for artists, Bravo finally announces nationwide casting calls. Developed by Sarah Jessica Parker’s Pretty Matches Productions and Emmy-nominated Magical Elves, Inc., the reality TV project pits thirteen aspiring artists against one another in competition for a gallery show, cash prize and a mysteriously undefined national tour. New York’s casting call takes place at White Columns on July 18th and 19th, which has us wondering: will their Executive Director Matthew Higgs be a judge? Complete press release and casting call details after the jump. Artists located in or around Los Angeles, Miami, Chicago and New York will want to read through if interested in participating.

Nationwide Casting Calls Underway

NEW YORK — June 30, 2009 — Bravo’s latest stroke on the reality canvas brings Golden Globe and Emmy Award winner Sarah Jessica Parker and her production company, Pretty Matches, together with the Emmy-nominated Magical Elves (“Top Chef,” “Project Runway”) and Eli Holzman, to produce an hour long creative competition series among contemporary artists. The Untitled Art Project will bring together thirteen aspiring artists to compete for a gallery show, a cash prize and a sponsored national tour. Open calls for artists interested in competing in this highly anticipated new competition series will be held in cities across the country starting in July.

Casting Calls for The Untitled Art Project are as follows:

LOS ANGELES

Saturday, July 11 & Sunday, July 12, 10 AM — 2 PM

LA>

www.laxart.org

MIAMI

Tuesday, July 14, 10 AM — 2 PM

Fredric Snitzer Gallery

www.Snitzer.com

CHICAGO

Thursday, July 16, 10 AM — 2 PM

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Sullivan Galleries, 33 State Street
www.saic.edu

NEW YORK

Saturday, July 18 & Sunday, July 19, 10:00 AM — 2:00 PM

White Columns

www.whitecolumns.org

For additional information, go to www.BravoTV.com/casting.

In each episode of the series, contestants will create unique pieces highlighting art’s role in everyday life, while they compete and create in a range of disciplines including sculpture, painting, photography and industrial design (to name a few). In working beyond their preferred mediums, artists will have to adapt quickly in order to succeed. Completed works of art will be appraised by a panel of top art world figures including fellow artists, gallerists, collectors, curators and critics. The finalists’ work will be showcased in a nation-wide museum tour.

The Untitled Art Project is produced by Pretty Matches and Magical Elves for Bravo. Dan Cutforth, Jane Lipsitz, Sarah Jessica Parker, Alison Benson and Eli Holzman serve as executive producers.

Bravo is a program service of NBC Universal Cable Entertainment, a division of NBC Universal, one of the world’s leading media and entertainment companies in the development, production, and marketing of entertainment, news, and information to a global audience. Bravo has been an NBC Universal cable network since December 2002 and was the first television service dedicated to film and the performing arts when it launched in December 1980. For more information, visit www.BravoTV.com.

{ 146 comments… read them below or add one }

Giovanni June 30, 2009 at 7:33 pm

Gross.

Reply

Giovanni June 30, 2009 at 2:33 pm

Gross.

Reply

Amory Blaine June 30, 2009 at 7:51 pm

Depending on the participants chosen, this could either be very good, or very very terribly bad. For art. For artists. For eyeballs.

Reply

Amory Blaine June 30, 2009 at 7:51 pm

Depending on the participants chosen, this could either be very good, or very very terribly bad. For art. For artists. For eyeballs.

Reply

Amory Blaine June 30, 2009 at 2:51 pm

Depending on the participants chosen, this could either be very good, or very very terribly bad. For art. For artists. For eyeballs.

Reply

anna mack June 30, 2009 at 8:41 pm

i have been waiting for this idea to come to fruition forever. i don’t care if it derides every single standard and ideal we maintain in our conception of what Art and Artists should be, i think it fuckin’ rules and i am foaming at the mouth in wait.

Reply

anna mack June 30, 2009 at 8:41 pm

i have been waiting for this idea to come to fruition forever. i don’t care if it derides every single standard and ideal we maintain in our conception of what Art and Artists should be, i think it fuckin’ rules and i am foaming at the mouth in wait.

Reply

anna mack June 30, 2009 at 3:41 pm

i have been waiting for this idea to come to fruition forever. i don’t care if it derides every single standard and ideal we maintain in our conception of what Art and Artists should be, i think it fuckin’ rules and i am foaming at the mouth in wait.

Reply

alek June 30, 2009 at 8:56 pm

agreed anna mack, I can’t wait. I’ve been waiting since last summer for this amazing or potentially mazing train wreck of a show to happen.

Reply

alek June 30, 2009 at 8:56 pm

agreed anna mack, I can’t wait. I’ve been waiting since last summer for this amazing or potentially mazing train wreck of a show to happen.

Reply

alek June 30, 2009 at 3:56 pm

agreed anna mack, I can’t wait. I’ve been waiting since last summer for this amazing or potentially mazing train wreck of a show to happen.

Reply

Rondell Jenkins June 30, 2009 at 9:28 pm

Why all them columns got to be white? Ugh.

Reply

Rondell Jenkins June 30, 2009 at 9:28 pm

Why all them columns got to be white? Ugh.

Reply

Rondell Jenkins June 30, 2009 at 4:28 pm

Why all them columns got to be white? Ugh.

Reply

lloyd July 1, 2009 at 1:12 am

This was proposed years ago by the artist who did Komic Kings, he showed the trailer for it at SGC in 2005. The show got to a point where MTV did a treatment for it and it was going to be called “Art Stars”. Did SJP and Bravo by the rights? or are they doing this regardless of a potential law suit?

This will be an awesome train wreck! while at the same time it will bring art back into the interest of soccer moms and joe sixpacks (for lack of better terms)in the US. So why not? What could it potentially hurt?

Reply

lloyd July 1, 2009 at 1:12 am

This was proposed years ago by the artist who did Komic Kings, he showed the trailer for it at SGC in 2005. The show got to a point where MTV did a treatment for it and it was going to be called “Art Stars”. Did SJP and Bravo by the rights? or are they doing this regardless of a potential law suit?

This will be an awesome train wreck! while at the same time it will bring art back into the interest of soccer moms and joe sixpacks (for lack of better terms)in the US. So why not? What could it potentially hurt?

Reply

lloyd June 30, 2009 at 8:12 pm

This was proposed years ago by the artist who did Komic Kings, he showed the trailer for it at SGC in 2005. The show got to a point where MTV did a treatment for it and it was going to be called “Art Stars”. Did SJP and Bravo by the rights? or are they doing this regardless of a potential law suit?

This will be an awesome train wreck! while at the same time it will bring art back into the interest of soccer moms and joe sixpacks (for lack of better terms)in the US. So why not? What could it potentially hurt?

Reply

anonymous July 1, 2009 at 5:57 am

so ‘you’ think ‘you’ can dance?

________ got talent

________ idol

yay

Reply

anonymous July 1, 2009 at 5:57 am

so ‘you’ think ‘you’ can dance?

________ got talent

________ idol

yay

Reply

anonymous July 1, 2009 at 12:57 am

so ‘you’ think ‘you’ can dance?

________ got talent

________ idol

yay

Reply

slick July 1, 2009 at 2:21 pm

didnt they already do this once?

Reply

slick July 1, 2009 at 2:21 pm

didnt they already do this once?

Reply

slick July 1, 2009 at 9:21 am

didnt they already do this once?

Reply

alex July 1, 2009 at 3:08 pm

This could potentially destroy the artists’ art who participate in the show. I think its great that they are finally doing something like this but to put it on something as commercial and accessible as bravo worries me. I am afraid it is going to either make a mockery out of fine art or commercialize the artists so much to a point of losing their vision…either way should be an interesting show.

Reply

alex July 1, 2009 at 3:08 pm

This could potentially destroy the artists’ art who participate in the show. I think its great that they are finally doing something like this but to put it on something as commercial and accessible as bravo worries me. I am afraid it is going to either make a mockery out of fine art or commercialize the artists so much to a point of losing their vision…either way should be an interesting show.

Reply

alex July 1, 2009 at 10:08 am

This could potentially destroy the artists’ art who participate in the show. I think its great that they are finally doing something like this but to put it on something as commercial and accessible as bravo worries me. I am afraid it is going to either make a mockery out of fine art or commercialize the artists so much to a point of losing their vision…either way should be an interesting show.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 1, 2009 at 5:59 pm

This sounds like the stupidest thing of all time. All reality shows are dumb, but this is egregiously dumb, not just on the part of the creators, but also anyone who participates as a contestant. How anyone with a shred of self-respect could imagine that this could be good in any way for their career is beyond me.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 1, 2009 at 12:59 pm

This sounds like the stupidest thing of all time. All reality shows are dumb, but this is egregiously dumb, not just on the part of the creators, but also anyone who participates as a contestant. How anyone with a shred of self-respect could imagine that this could be good in any way for their career is beyond me.

Reply

kookooo July 1, 2009 at 7:10 pm

Thinking of trying to get on this. Would this be a bad idea? I mean, art isn’t as sales oriented as fashion or food, but at the same time if you go on and just kind of stay true to yourself, how bad can it turn out?

Reply

kookooo July 1, 2009 at 7:10 pm

Thinking of trying to get on this. Would this be a bad idea? I mean, art isn’t as sales oriented as fashion or food, but at the same time if you go on and just kind of stay true to yourself, how bad can it turn out?

Reply

kookooo July 1, 2009 at 7:10 pm

Thinking of trying to get on this. Would this be a bad idea? I mean, art isn’t as sales oriented as fashion or food, but at the same time if you go on and just kind of stay true to yourself, how bad can it turn out?

Reply

kookooo July 1, 2009 at 2:10 pm

Thinking of trying to get on this. Would this be a bad idea? I mean, art isn’t as sales oriented as fashion or food, but at the same time if you go on and just kind of stay true to yourself, how bad can it turn out?

Reply

Mike July 1, 2009 at 10:05 pm

While I think this will provide entertaining television, I strongly agree with Amory. This could be a disaster for art/artists.

Reply

Mike July 1, 2009 at 10:05 pm

While I think this will provide entertaining television, I strongly agree with Amory. This could be a disaster for art/artists.

Reply

Mike July 1, 2009 at 10:05 pm

While I think this will provide entertaining television, I strongly agree with Amory. This could be a disaster for art/artists.

Reply

Mike July 1, 2009 at 5:05 pm

While I think this will provide entertaining television, I strongly agree with Amory. This could be a disaster for art/artists.

Reply

kookooo July 2, 2009 at 12:36 pm

Do you mean art/artists in general, or the ones on the show? I’d be curious to know how the contestants on, say, Project Runway think that being on the show affected their lives.

I mean, the art world already takes itself too seriously. I would hate to pass up an opportunity to do something fun that would put me in front of the world because I’m afraid the serious “Art World” would think less of me for it when the art world probably doesn’t give a crap about me anyway.

Galleries are about money. They may belly-ache about the show in advance but if someone interesting is on there and people become interested in buying their work, you’d better believe that galleries will change their tunes.

The closest thing I remember was when the first season of the Apprentice featured a bunch of artists that the show’s contestants had to sell. I remember reading an interview with one of the painters who said that being on the show was the best thing that had ever happened to him and that tons of people were contacting him about buying his work.

Reply

kookooo July 2, 2009 at 7:36 am

Do you mean art/artists in general, or the ones on the show? I’d be curious to know how the contestants on, say, Project Runway think that being on the show affected their lives.

I mean, the art world already takes itself too seriously. I would hate to pass up an opportunity to do something fun that would put me in front of the world because I’m afraid the serious “Art World” would think less of me for it when the art world probably doesn’t give a crap about me anyway.

Galleries are about money. They may belly-ache about the show in advance but if someone interesting is on there and people become interested in buying their work, you’d better believe that galleries will change their tunes.

The closest thing I remember was when the first season of the Apprentice featured a bunch of artists that the show’s contestants had to sell. I remember reading an interview with one of the painters who said that being on the show was the best thing that had ever happened to him and that tons of people were contacting him about buying his work.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 1:41 pm

Reality shows are all about making the viewers at home feel superior by humiliating and abusing the contestants. Even Susan Boyle, who very briefly became beloved for the most obnoxious of reasons — she can sing so beautifully but she’s homely! — was eaten up by the machine.

Further, the atmosphere of a game show — sculpt a portrait of Andy Warhol out of cake frosting, you have one hour starting now! — isn’t going to be conducive to good art or even okay art. It’s going to be poisonous.

Entering this show, you’ll be putting perception of yourself into the hands of others, whose only goal is to provide drama by making everyone look as bad as possible. You’ll be giving them full control of your public persona.

Plenty of people lacking substance — fashion models, amateur dancers, hunky bachelors — can put themselves in such a position by saying, hey, it’ll get me noticed! But an artist should have some substance to them. There should be more to you than can be publicized by a TV game show.

If, however, as an artist you have nothing going for you but your looks and your willingness to be humiliated in public, by all means, audition for the show.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 1:41 pm

Reality shows are all about making the viewers at home feel superior by humiliating and abusing the contestants. Even Susan Boyle, who very briefly became beloved for the most obnoxious of reasons — she can sing so beautifully but she’s homely! — was eaten up by the machine.

Further, the atmosphere of a game show — sculpt a portrait of Andy Warhol out of cake frosting, you have one hour starting now! — isn’t going to be conducive to good art or even okay art. It’s going to be poisonous.

Entering this show, you’ll be putting perception of yourself into the hands of others, whose only goal is to provide drama by making everyone look as bad as possible. You’ll be giving them full control of your public persona.

Plenty of people lacking substance — fashion models, amateur dancers, hunky bachelors — can put themselves in such a position by saying, hey, it’ll get me noticed! But an artist should have some substance to them. There should be more to you than can be publicized by a TV game show.

If, however, as an artist you have nothing going for you but your looks and your willingness to be humiliated in public, by all means, audition for the show.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 1:41 pm

Reality shows are all about making the viewers at home feel superior by humiliating and abusing the contestants. Even Susan Boyle, who very briefly became beloved for the most obnoxious of reasons — she can sing so beautifully but she’s homely! — was eaten up by the machine.

Further, the atmosphere of a game show — sculpt a portrait of Andy Warhol out of cake frosting, you have one hour starting now! — isn’t going to be conducive to good art or even okay art. It’s going to be poisonous.

Entering this show, you’ll be putting perception of yourself into the hands of others, whose only goal is to provide drama by making everyone look as bad as possible. You’ll be giving them full control of your public persona.

Plenty of people lacking substance — fashion models, amateur dancers, hunky bachelors — can put themselves in such a position by saying, hey, it’ll get me noticed! But an artist should have some substance to them. There should be more to you than can be publicized by a TV game show.

If, however, as an artist you have nothing going for you but your looks and your willingness to be humiliated in public, by all means, audition for the show.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 1:41 pm

Reality shows are all about making the viewers at home feel superior by humiliating and abusing the contestants. Even Susan Boyle, who very briefly became beloved for the most obnoxious of reasons — she can sing so beautifully but she’s homely! — was eaten up by the machine.

Further, the atmosphere of a game show — sculpt a portrait of Andy Warhol out of cake frosting, you have one hour starting now! — isn’t going to be conducive to good art or even okay art. It’s going to be poisonous.

Entering this show, you’ll be putting perception of yourself into the hands of others, whose only goal is to provide drama by making everyone look as bad as possible. You’ll be giving them full control of your public persona.

Plenty of people lacking substance — fashion models, amateur dancers, hunky bachelors — can put themselves in such a position by saying, hey, it’ll get me noticed! But an artist should have some substance to them. There should be more to you than can be publicized by a TV game show.

If, however, as an artist you have nothing going for you but your looks and your willingness to be humiliated in public, by all means, audition for the show.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 8:41 am

Reality shows are all about making the viewers at home feel superior by humiliating and abusing the contestants. Even Susan Boyle, who very briefly became beloved for the most obnoxious of reasons — she can sing so beautifully but she’s homely! — was eaten up by the machine.

Further, the atmosphere of a game show — sculpt a portrait of Andy Warhol out of cake frosting, you have one hour starting now! — isn’t going to be conducive to good art or even okay art. It’s going to be poisonous.

Entering this show, you’ll be putting perception of yourself into the hands of others, whose only goal is to provide drama by making everyone look as bad as possible. You’ll be giving them full control of your public persona.

Plenty of people lacking substance — fashion models, amateur dancers, hunky bachelors — can put themselves in such a position by saying, hey, it’ll get me noticed! But an artist should have some substance to them. There should be more to you than can be publicized by a TV game show.

If, however, as an artist you have nothing going for you but your looks and your willingness to be humiliated in public, by all means, audition for the show.

Reply

Art Fag City July 2, 2009 at 1:48 pm

@chris The scenario you’re describing has no grounding. Project Runway was exceptional because the model at least strove to be recognized within the fashion world as valuable. Magical Elves are attempting to do the same thing here. They may not succeed, but it the goal of making “everyone look as bad as possible” is recognized to be not particularly effective in creating the kinds of reality shows they are known for.

Reply

Art Fag City July 2, 2009 at 1:48 pm

@chris The scenario you’re describing has no grounding. Project Runway was exceptional because the model at least strove to be recognized within the fashion world as valuable. Magical Elves are attempting to do the same thing here. They may not succeed, but it the goal of making “everyone look as bad as possible” is recognized to be not particularly effective in creating the kinds of reality shows they are known for.

Reply

Art Fag City July 2, 2009 at 8:48 am

@chris The scenario you’re describing has no grounding. Project Runway was exceptional because the model at least strove to be recognized within the fashion world as valuable. Magical Elves are attempting to do the same thing here. They may not succeed, but it the goal of making “everyone look as bad as possible” is recognized to be not particularly effective in creating the kinds of reality shows they are known for.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 10:10 am

You’re right, how silly of me. Reality shows aren’t about watching people throw tantrums, get abused for their decisions, fail miserably at tasks they’re given, and perform dopey stunts (“Dress a female wrestler!”). They’re perfectly sober contests of skill engaged in by the very best of professionals.

I guess I made a mistake based on how little I watch reality TV, since I’m trying to save up my neurons for retirement.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 3:10 pm

You’re right, how silly of me. Reality shows aren’t about watching people throw tantrums, get abused for their decisions, fail miserably at tasks they’re given, and perform dopey stunts (“Dress a female wrestler!”). They’re perfectly sober contests of skill engaged in by the very best of professionals.

I guess I made a mistake based on how little I watch reality TV, since I’m trying to save up my neurons for retirement.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 3:10 pm

You’re right, how silly of me. Reality shows aren’t about watching people throw tantrums, get abused for their decisions, fail miserably at tasks they’re given, and perform dopey stunts (“Dress a female wrestler!”). They’re perfectly sober contests of skill engaged in by the very best of professionals.

I guess I made a mistake based on how little I watch reality TV, since I’m trying to save up my neurons for retirement.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 3:10 pm

You’re right, how silly of me. Reality shows aren’t about watching people throw tantrums, get abused for their decisions, fail miserably at tasks they’re given, and perform dopey stunts (“Dress a female wrestler!”). They’re perfectly sober contests of skill engaged in by the very best of professionals.

I guess I made a mistake based on how little I watch reality TV, since I’m trying to save up my neurons for retirement.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 3:10 pm

You’re right, how silly of me. Reality shows aren’t about watching people throw tantrums, get abused for their decisions, fail miserably at tasks they’re given, and perform dopey stunts (“Dress a female wrestler!”). They’re perfectly sober contests of skill engaged in by the very best of professionals.

I guess I made a mistake based on how little I watch reality TV, since I’m trying to save up my neurons for retirement.

Reply

Art Fag City July 2, 2009 at 3:15 pm

Chill out.

Reply

Art Fag City July 2, 2009 at 3:15 pm

Chill out.

Reply

Art Fag City July 2, 2009 at 3:15 pm

Chill out.

Reply

Art Fag City July 2, 2009 at 10:15 am

Chill out.

Reply

kookooo July 2, 2009 at 5:36 pm

In my mind the shows by Magical Elves are in a different category. There are morons on their shows too, of course, but I’ve seen a lot of people on Project Runway and Top Chef that I admire and that seem to be at the top of their game. Art is different from cooking and fashion, of course, but I do think that this particular production unit is more geared towards quality than, say, the makers of Flavor of Love.

(Although yeah the dress a female wrestler bit was a lowpoint, but honestly even that episode offered particular design challenges that forced them to use their heads.)

Ugh what to do! I’ll probably go and audition just to see what it’s about and see what the experience of that is like. Then when I don’t even need to decide whether to go on or not since I won’t get picked, I can watch the show and really enjoy it for my brush with it.

Reply

kookooo July 2, 2009 at 5:36 pm

In my mind the shows by Magical Elves are in a different category. There are morons on their shows too, of course, but I’ve seen a lot of people on Project Runway and Top Chef that I admire and that seem to be at the top of their game. Art is different from cooking and fashion, of course, but I do think that this particular production unit is more geared towards quality than, say, the makers of Flavor of Love.

(Although yeah the dress a female wrestler bit was a lowpoint, but honestly even that episode offered particular design challenges that forced them to use their heads.)

Ugh what to do! I’ll probably go and audition just to see what it’s about and see what the experience of that is like. Then when I don’t even need to decide whether to go on or not since I won’t get picked, I can watch the show and really enjoy it for my brush with it.

Reply

kookooo July 2, 2009 at 5:36 pm

In my mind the shows by Magical Elves are in a different category. There are morons on their shows too, of course, but I’ve seen a lot of people on Project Runway and Top Chef that I admire and that seem to be at the top of their game. Art is different from cooking and fashion, of course, but I do think that this particular production unit is more geared towards quality than, say, the makers of Flavor of Love.

(Although yeah the dress a female wrestler bit was a lowpoint, but honestly even that episode offered particular design challenges that forced them to use their heads.)

Ugh what to do! I’ll probably go and audition just to see what it’s about and see what the experience of that is like. Then when I don’t even need to decide whether to go on or not since I won’t get picked, I can watch the show and really enjoy it for my brush with it.

Reply

kookooo July 2, 2009 at 5:36 pm

In my mind the shows by Magical Elves are in a different category. There are morons on their shows too, of course, but I’ve seen a lot of people on Project Runway and Top Chef that I admire and that seem to be at the top of their game. Art is different from cooking and fashion, of course, but I do think that this particular production unit is more geared towards quality than, say, the makers of Flavor of Love.

(Although yeah the dress a female wrestler bit was a lowpoint, but honestly even that episode offered particular design challenges that forced them to use their heads.)

Ugh what to do! I’ll probably go and audition just to see what it’s about and see what the experience of that is like. Then when I don’t even need to decide whether to go on or not since I won’t get picked, I can watch the show and really enjoy it for my brush with it.

Reply

kookooo July 2, 2009 at 12:36 pm

In my mind the shows by Magical Elves are in a different category. There are morons on their shows too, of course, but I’ve seen a lot of people on Project Runway and Top Chef that I admire and that seem to be at the top of their game. Art is different from cooking and fashion, of course, but I do think that this particular production unit is more geared towards quality than, say, the makers of Flavor of Love.

(Although yeah the dress a female wrestler bit was a lowpoint, but honestly even that episode offered particular design challenges that forced them to use their heads.)

Ugh what to do! I’ll probably go and audition just to see what it’s about and see what the experience of that is like. Then when I don’t even need to decide whether to go on or not since I won’t get picked, I can watch the show and really enjoy it for my brush with it.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 6:01 pm

I checked the Magical Elves site and, yes, their shows seem to be at the higher end of the reality show ladder. So it’s “The Price Is Right”, not “The Gong Show”. You’d still be handing over the crafting of your onscreen persona to people who don’t necessarily have your best interests at heart.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 6:01 pm

I checked the Magical Elves site and, yes, their shows seem to be at the higher end of the reality show ladder. So it’s “The Price Is Right”, not “The Gong Show”. You’d still be handing over the crafting of your onscreen persona to people who don’t necessarily have your best interests at heart.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 6:01 pm

I checked the Magical Elves site and, yes, their shows seem to be at the higher end of the reality show ladder. So it’s “The Price Is Right”, not “The Gong Show”. You’d still be handing over the crafting of your onscreen persona to people who don’t necessarily have your best interests at heart.

Reply

Chris Rywalt July 2, 2009 at 1:01 pm

I checked the Magical Elves site and, yes, their shows seem to be at the higher end of the reality show ladder. So it’s “The Price Is Right”, not “The Gong Show”. You’d still be handing over the crafting of your onscreen persona to people who don’t necessarily have your best interests at heart.

Reply

kookooo July 3, 2009 at 2:07 am

Well, we all do that in one way or another every day. This might be a bit more extreme of a version of that but life is about seizing opportunities and owning them. There will be some people on this show who will embarrass themselves and there will be some who will make their careers on it.

Reply

kookooo July 2, 2009 at 9:07 pm

Well, we all do that in one way or another every day. This might be a bit more extreme of a version of that but life is about seizing opportunities and owning them. There will be some people on this show who will embarrass themselves and there will be some who will make their careers on it.

Reply

Bert Green July 4, 2009 at 4:41 am

The producers of this show (who have offices in my downtown Los Angeles neighborhood) called me and tried (in a totally passive/aggressive way) to get me to shoot their auditions for free at my gallery. For free. They will spend and make millions of dollars on this stupid show (I heard the budget is $198 million) and they can’t afford to pay a reasonable fee for a location? Worse, they tried the oldest Hollywood trick in the book: “But the exposure will be great!” Riiiiiiight.

But what matters is that they don’t know and don’t care about the art. Sarah Jessica Parker? Reality TV? Whatever.

Reply

Bert Green July 4, 2009 at 4:41 am

The producers of this show (who have offices in my downtown Los Angeles neighborhood) called me and tried (in a totally passive/aggressive way) to get me to shoot their auditions for free at my gallery. For free. They will spend and make millions of dollars on this stupid show (I heard the budget is $198 million) and they can’t afford to pay a reasonable fee for a location? Worse, they tried the oldest Hollywood trick in the book: “But the exposure will be great!” Riiiiiiight.

But what matters is that they don’t know and don’t care about the art. Sarah Jessica Parker? Reality TV? Whatever.

Reply

Bert Green July 4, 2009 at 4:41 am

The producers of this show (who have offices in my downtown Los Angeles neighborhood) called me and tried (in a totally passive/aggressive way) to get me to shoot their auditions for free at my gallery. For free. They will spend and make millions of dollars on this stupid show (I heard the budget is $198 million) and they can’t afford to pay a reasonable fee for a location? Worse, they tried the oldest Hollywood trick in the book: “But the exposure will be great!” Riiiiiiight.

But what matters is that they don’t know and don’t care about the art. Sarah Jessica Parker? Reality TV? Whatever.

Reply

Bert Green July 4, 2009 at 4:41 am

The producers of this show (who have offices in my downtown Los Angeles neighborhood) called me and tried (in a totally passive/aggressive way) to get me to shoot their auditions for free at my gallery. For free. They will spend and make millions of dollars on this stupid show (I heard the budget is $198 million) and they can’t afford to pay a reasonable fee for a location? Worse, they tried the oldest Hollywood trick in the book: “But the exposure will be great!” Riiiiiiight.

But what matters is that they don’t know and don’t care about the art. Sarah Jessica Parker? Reality TV? Whatever.

Reply

Bert Green July 3, 2009 at 11:41 pm

The producers of this show (who have offices in my downtown Los Angeles neighborhood) called me and tried (in a totally passive/aggressive way) to get me to shoot their auditions for free at my gallery. For free. They will spend and make millions of dollars on this stupid show (I heard the budget is $198 million) and they can’t afford to pay a reasonable fee for a location? Worse, they tried the oldest Hollywood trick in the book: “But the exposure will be great!” Riiiiiiight.

But what matters is that they don’t know and don’t care about the art. Sarah Jessica Parker? Reality TV? Whatever.

Reply

the intellectual youth July 5, 2009 at 7:09 am

this is beyond lame

Reply

the intellectual youth July 5, 2009 at 7:09 am

this is beyond lame

Reply

the intellectual youth July 5, 2009 at 7:09 am

this is beyond lame

Reply

the intellectual youth July 5, 2009 at 7:09 am

this is beyond lame

Reply

the intellectual youth July 5, 2009 at 2:09 am

this is beyond lame

Reply

Art Fag City July 6, 2009 at 4:27 pm

@Bert Green: I expect this kind of arrangement is fairly common. From the small amount of gallery work I did in the field of crappy art likely to end up in Banana Republic art rental on TV sets, networks always promised exposure but no payment for its use. Not the best deal for most art.

Reply

Art Fag City July 6, 2009 at 4:27 pm

@Bert Green: I expect this kind of arrangement is fairly common. From the small amount of gallery work I did in the field of crappy art likely to end up in Banana Republic art rental on TV sets, networks always promised exposure but no payment for its use. Not the best deal for most art.

Reply

Art Fag City July 6, 2009 at 4:27 pm

@Bert Green: I expect this kind of arrangement is fairly common. From the small amount of gallery work I did in the field of crappy art likely to end up in Banana Republic art rental on TV sets, networks always promised exposure but no payment for its use. Not the best deal for most art.

Reply

Art Fag City July 6, 2009 at 4:27 pm

@Bert Green: I expect this kind of arrangement is fairly common. From the small amount of gallery work I did in the field of crappy art likely to end up in Banana Republic art rental on TV sets, networks always promised exposure but no payment for its use. Not the best deal for most art.

Reply

Art Fag City July 6, 2009 at 11:27 am

@Bert Green: I expect this kind of arrangement is fairly common. From the small amount of gallery work I did in the field of crappy art likely to end up in Banana Republic art rental on TV sets, networks always promised exposure but no payment for its use. Not the best deal for most art.

Reply

desiree July 7, 2009 at 4:20 pm

I met Christian Siriano who won Project Runway a few years ago]. His life is great. He made money, everyone knows him…he will continue to sell his fashion because he has something more than fame – he has TALENT.

Some of the chefs from Top Chef have done quite well in their industry because they have TALENT.

If you – as an artist – could get on a national morning show – have Matt Lauer talk about your work and plug your web site – you would do it.

Let’s face it – the majority of working artists are NEVER going to be discovered or promoted by the top echelon galleries. The exposure on this show could be positive – not negative [depending on the drama]… but the few that remain will have to have some sort of talent. The opportunity for the thirteen chosen artists to get paid for their time, potentially get discovered by millions of Americans [and others] and SELL their work – well, it just might pay off.

Reply

desiree July 7, 2009 at 4:20 pm

I met Christian Siriano who won Project Runway a few years ago]. His life is great. He made money, everyone knows him…he will continue to sell his fashion because he has something more than fame – he has TALENT.

Some of the chefs from Top Chef have done quite well in their industry because they have TALENT.

If you – as an artist – could get on a national morning show – have Matt Lauer talk about your work and plug your web site – you would do it.

Let’s face it – the majority of working artists are NEVER going to be discovered or promoted by the top echelon galleries. The exposure on this show could be positive – not negative [depending on the drama]… but the few that remain will have to have some sort of talent. The opportunity for the thirteen chosen artists to get paid for their time, potentially get discovered by millions of Americans [and others] and SELL their work – well, it just might pay off.

Reply

desiree July 7, 2009 at 4:20 pm

I met Christian Siriano who won Project Runway a few years ago]. His life is great. He made money, everyone knows him…he will continue to sell his fashion because he has something more than fame – he has TALENT.

Some of the chefs from Top Chef have done quite well in their industry because they have TALENT.

If you – as an artist – could get on a national morning show – have Matt Lauer talk about your work and plug your web site – you would do it.

Let’s face it – the majority of working artists are NEVER going to be discovered or promoted by the top echelon galleries. The exposure on this show could be positive – not negative [depending on the drama]… but the few that remain will have to have some sort of talent. The opportunity for the thirteen chosen artists to get paid for their time, potentially get discovered by millions of Americans [and others] and SELL their work – well, it just might pay off.

Reply

desiree July 7, 2009 at 11:20 am

I met Christian Siriano who won Project Runway a few years ago]. His life is great. He made money, everyone knows him…he will continue to sell his fashion because he has something more than fame – he has TALENT.

Some of the chefs from Top Chef have done quite well in their industry because they have TALENT.

If you – as an artist – could get on a national morning show – have Matt Lauer talk about your work and plug your web site – you would do it.

Let’s face it – the majority of working artists are NEVER going to be discovered or promoted by the top echelon galleries. The exposure on this show could be positive – not negative [depending on the drama]… but the few that remain will have to have some sort of talent. The opportunity for the thirteen chosen artists to get paid for their time, potentially get discovered by millions of Americans [and others] and SELL their work – well, it just might pay off.

Reply

kookooo July 8, 2009 at 1:49 pm

I doubt very much that Bravo spends $198 mil on all of their reality shows in a year combined. Not saying you should work for them for free, but that number is absolutely ridiculous.

Reply

kookooo July 8, 2009 at 1:49 pm

I doubt very much that Bravo spends $198 mil on all of their reality shows in a year combined. Not saying you should work for them for free, but that number is absolutely ridiculous.

Reply

kookooo July 8, 2009 at 1:49 pm

I doubt very much that Bravo spends $198 mil on all of their reality shows in a year combined. Not saying you should work for them for free, but that number is absolutely ridiculous.

Reply

kookooo July 8, 2009 at 8:49 am

I doubt very much that Bravo spends $198 mil on all of their reality shows in a year combined. Not saying you should work for them for free, but that number is absolutely ridiculous.

Reply

kookooo July 9, 2009 at 4:03 pm

I’m going over the application now and one of the first questions is if you have a girlfriend or boyfriend. No option for if you’re married. Maybe a glimpse into the mindset of the producers…

Reply

kookooo July 9, 2009 at 4:03 pm

I’m going over the application now and one of the first questions is if you have a girlfriend or boyfriend. No option for if you’re married. Maybe a glimpse into the mindset of the producers…

Reply

kookooo July 9, 2009 at 4:03 pm

I’m going over the application now and one of the first questions is if you have a girlfriend or boyfriend. No option for if you’re married. Maybe a glimpse into the mindset of the producers…

Reply

kookooo July 9, 2009 at 4:03 pm

I’m going over the application now and one of the first questions is if you have a girlfriend or boyfriend. No option for if you’re married. Maybe a glimpse into the mindset of the producers…

Reply

kookooo July 9, 2009 at 11:03 am

I’m going over the application now and one of the first questions is if you have a girlfriend or boyfriend. No option for if you’re married. Maybe a glimpse into the mindset of the producers…

Reply

Bert Green July 10, 2009 at 6:29 am

@Art Fag City: No, that arrangement is not common. Downtown LA is the single most filmed location in the world. There are an average of 50 shoots a week here (in my small 20 block neighborhood). NOBODY provides free locations to a profit-making entity. Nobody. That’s insane.

Anyway, the smallest 30 second commercial usually has a $5 million budget. $198 million for a series is about right, especially considering that Sarah Jessica Parker probably would not do this for less that 50 million just for herself.

Reply

Bert Green July 10, 2009 at 6:29 am

@Art Fag City: No, that arrangement is not common. Downtown LA is the single most filmed location in the world. There are an average of 50 shoots a week here (in my small 20 block neighborhood). NOBODY provides free locations to a profit-making entity. Nobody. That’s insane.

Anyway, the smallest 30 second commercial usually has a $5 million budget. $198 million for a series is about right, especially considering that Sarah Jessica Parker probably would not do this for less that 50 million just for herself.

Reply

Bert Green July 10, 2009 at 6:29 am

@Art Fag City: No, that arrangement is not common. Downtown LA is the single most filmed location in the world. There are an average of 50 shoots a week here (in my small 20 block neighborhood). NOBODY provides free locations to a profit-making entity. Nobody. That’s insane.

Anyway, the smallest 30 second commercial usually has a $5 million budget. $198 million for a series is about right, especially considering that Sarah Jessica Parker probably would not do this for less that 50 million just for herself.

Reply

Bert Green July 10, 2009 at 1:29 am

@Art Fag City: No, that arrangement is not common. Downtown LA is the single most filmed location in the world. There are an average of 50 shoots a week here (in my small 20 block neighborhood). NOBODY provides free locations to a profit-making entity. Nobody. That’s insane.

Anyway, the smallest 30 second commercial usually has a $5 million budget. $198 million for a series is about right, especially considering that Sarah Jessica Parker probably would not do this for less that 50 million just for herself.

Reply

Jarvis July 10, 2009 at 9:05 pm

i believe the “198 Million” figure refers to Damien Hirst’s sell-out of a recent Sotheby’s auction in 2008, and was included in their press release…. and not the cost of the show.

Reply

Jarvis July 10, 2009 at 9:05 pm

i believe the “198 Million” figure refers to Damien Hirst’s sell-out of a recent Sotheby’s auction in 2008, and was included in their press release…. and not the cost of the show.

Reply

Jarvis July 10, 2009 at 9:05 pm

i believe the “198 Million” figure refers to Damien Hirst’s sell-out of a recent Sotheby’s auction in 2008, and was included in their press release…. and not the cost of the show.

Reply

Jarvis July 10, 2009 at 9:05 pm

i believe the “198 Million” figure refers to Damien Hirst’s sell-out of a recent Sotheby’s auction in 2008, and was included in their press release…. and not the cost of the show.

Reply

Jarvis July 10, 2009 at 4:05 pm

i believe the “198 Million” figure refers to Damien Hirst’s sell-out of a recent Sotheby’s auction in 2008, and was included in their press release…. and not the cost of the show.

Reply

Joey Jo Jo July 12, 2009 at 1:22 am

Okay Chris R. stop trying to convince everyone not to go to the casting call so you get a good spot in line, you silly billy.

I too have been watching this unfold and thought the idea got dropped after not hearing anything from those Magical Elves for so long. I think it will be fun to go to the call and even more fun to compete. I don’t think it will be sculpt Warhol’s head out of frosting, but it does raise the question of how will they make competitions in a medium not so easily adapted to time-based output?

Reply

Joey Jo Jo July 12, 2009 at 1:22 am

Okay Chris R. stop trying to convince everyone not to go to the casting call so you get a good spot in line, you silly billy.

I too have been watching this unfold and thought the idea got dropped after not hearing anything from those Magical Elves for so long. I think it will be fun to go to the call and even more fun to compete. I don’t think it will be sculpt Warhol’s head out of frosting, but it does raise the question of how will they make competitions in a medium not so easily adapted to time-based output?

Reply

Joey Jo Jo July 12, 2009 at 1:22 am

Okay Chris R. stop trying to convince everyone not to go to the casting call so you get a good spot in line, you silly billy.

I too have been watching this unfold and thought the idea got dropped after not hearing anything from those Magical Elves for so long. I think it will be fun to go to the call and even more fun to compete. I don’t think it will be sculpt Warhol’s head out of frosting, but it does raise the question of how will they make competitions in a medium not so easily adapted to time-based output?

Reply

Joey Jo Jo July 12, 2009 at 1:22 am

Okay Chris R. stop trying to convince everyone not to go to the casting call so you get a good spot in line, you silly billy.

I too have been watching this unfold and thought the idea got dropped after not hearing anything from those Magical Elves for so long. I think it will be fun to go to the call and even more fun to compete. I don’t think it will be sculpt Warhol’s head out of frosting, but it does raise the question of how will they make competitions in a medium not so easily adapted to time-based output?

Reply

Joey Jo Jo July 11, 2009 at 8:22 pm

Okay Chris R. stop trying to convince everyone not to go to the casting call so you get a good spot in line, you silly billy.

I too have been watching this unfold and thought the idea got dropped after not hearing anything from those Magical Elves for so long. I think it will be fun to go to the call and even more fun to compete. I don’t think it will be sculpt Warhol’s head out of frosting, but it does raise the question of how will they make competitions in a medium not so easily adapted to time-based output?

Reply

desiree July 13, 2009 at 7:14 pm

I went to the casting and you can be sure married or “older” artists were not considered.
A few people were skipped ahead of the rest – obviously friends of the producers.

Reply

desiree July 13, 2009 at 7:14 pm

I went to the casting and you can be sure married or “older” artists were not considered.
A few people were skipped ahead of the rest – obviously friends of the producers.

Reply

desiree July 13, 2009 at 7:14 pm

I went to the casting and you can be sure married or “older” artists were not considered.
A few people were skipped ahead of the rest – obviously friends of the producers.

Reply

desiree July 13, 2009 at 2:14 pm

I went to the casting and you can be sure married or “older” artists were not considered.
A few people were skipped ahead of the rest – obviously friends of the producers.

Reply

bunny and minky July 16, 2009 at 12:01 am

will you be serving wieners at the audition?

Reply

bunny and minky July 16, 2009 at 12:01 am

will you be serving wieners at the audition?

Reply

bunny and minky July 16, 2009 at 12:01 am

will you be serving wieners at the audition?

Reply

bunny and minky July 15, 2009 at 7:01 pm

will you be serving wieners at the audition?

Reply

Jack July 16, 2009 at 5:41 pm

Hi, was was wondering if you could answer a few questions or tell me where I could find the answers please!! I did read the bravo site thoroughly, maybe I missed something. I would like to audition in new york but would prefer to go only on sunday – the site says auditions are saturday and sunday so does that mean we can chose which day to come, or that we must attend both? Also, when they mention “hard copy portfolio” do they mean a small black binder with 8 1/2″ by 11″ color prints of work? Any help would be appreciated :)

Reply

Jack July 16, 2009 at 5:41 pm

Hi, was was wondering if you could answer a few questions or tell me where I could find the answers please!! I did read the bravo site thoroughly, maybe I missed something. I would like to audition in new york but would prefer to go only on sunday – the site says auditions are saturday and sunday so does that mean we can chose which day to come, or that we must attend both? Also, when they mention “hard copy portfolio” do they mean a small black binder with 8 1/2″ by 11″ color prints of work? Any help would be appreciated :)

Reply

Jack July 16, 2009 at 12:41 pm

Hi, was was wondering if you could answer a few questions or tell me where I could find the answers please!! I did read the bravo site thoroughly, maybe I missed something. I would like to audition in new york but would prefer to go only on sunday – the site says auditions are saturday and sunday so does that mean we can chose which day to come, or that we must attend both? Also, when they mention “hard copy portfolio” do they mean a small black binder with 8 1/2″ by 11″ color prints of work? Any help would be appreciated :)

Reply

TH July 16, 2009 at 7:38 pm

Reading the application’s legal agreement the applicants are giving Bravo a lot of power: copyright of images submitted in the application (whether or not one is cast) and the right to perform background checks secretly that can be used on the show. Whatever one thinks of art and artists appearing in a game show context the applicants are already waiving rights.

Also, what professional in the contemporary art world would want to take part as expert or judge? TV exposure can move jeans or fill restaurants, but can it sell museum memberships or move $30,000 paintings? One would think association with reality TV would damage a reputation. Or maybe I am being old fashioned.

Reply

TH July 16, 2009 at 2:38 pm

Reading the application’s legal agreement the applicants are giving Bravo a lot of power: copyright of images submitted in the application (whether or not one is cast) and the right to perform background checks secretly that can be used on the show. Whatever one thinks of art and artists appearing in a game show context the applicants are already waiving rights.

Also, what professional in the contemporary art world would want to take part as expert or judge? TV exposure can move jeans or fill restaurants, but can it sell museum memberships or move $30,000 paintings? One would think association with reality TV would damage a reputation. Or maybe I am being old fashioned.

Reply

charles mcneel July 19, 2009 at 2:05 pm

i was interested in the show until i read the fine print of the application. it asks for truthful answers to their questions, while disclaims it may and can portray participants in “disparaging, defamatory, embarrassing or of an otherwise unfavorable nature”. This show, in my opinion, isn’t about exposing good and true artist, but about exploiting and contriving the persons who will be executing their own creativity while giving up sole rights to the images to be altered by “program” to serve “its” needs. so im staying true to myself as an artist, and say no thanks to this “reality show”.

Reply

charles mcneel July 19, 2009 at 2:05 pm

i was interested in the show until i read the fine print of the application. it asks for truthful answers to their questions, while disclaims it may and can portray participants in “disparaging, defamatory, embarrassing or of an otherwise unfavorable nature”. This show, in my opinion, isn’t about exposing good and true artist, but about exploiting and contriving the persons who will be executing their own creativity while giving up sole rights to the images to be altered by “program” to serve “its” needs. so im staying true to myself as an artist, and say no thanks to this “reality show”.

Reply

charles mcneel July 19, 2009 at 2:05 pm

i was interested in the show until i read the fine print of the application. it asks for truthful answers to their questions, while disclaims it may and can portray participants in “disparaging, defamatory, embarrassing or of an otherwise unfavorable nature”. This show, in my opinion, isn’t about exposing good and true artist, but about exploiting and contriving the persons who will be executing their own creativity while giving up sole rights to the images to be altered by “program” to serve “its” needs. so im staying true to myself as an artist, and say no thanks to this “reality show”.

Reply

charles mcneel July 19, 2009 at 9:05 am

i was interested in the show until i read the fine print of the application. it asks for truthful answers to their questions, while disclaims it may and can portray participants in “disparaging, defamatory, embarrassing or of an otherwise unfavorable nature”. This show, in my opinion, isn’t about exposing good and true artist, but about exploiting and contriving the persons who will be executing their own creativity while giving up sole rights to the images to be altered by “program” to serve “its” needs. so im staying true to myself as an artist, and say no thanks to this “reality show”.

Reply

Weeno July 21, 2009 at 7:03 am

Waiting for this show is like waiting for a bomb strapped to your chest to go off.

Reply

Weeno July 21, 2009 at 7:03 am

Waiting for this show is like waiting for a bomb strapped to your chest to go off.

Reply

Weeno July 21, 2009 at 7:03 am

Waiting for this show is like waiting for a bomb strapped to your chest to go off.

Reply

Weeno July 21, 2009 at 2:03 am

Waiting for this show is like waiting for a bomb strapped to your chest to go off.

Reply

interstate movers July 21, 2009 at 2:56 pm

I’m more excited to find out the outcome of this untitled art project reality tv. @ Amory Blaine, your’re right, “this could either be very good, or very very terribly bad. For art. For artists. For eyeballs.”

Reply

interstate movers July 21, 2009 at 2:56 pm

I’m more excited to find out the outcome of this untitled art project reality tv. @ Amory Blaine, your’re right, “this could either be very good, or very very terribly bad. For art. For artists. For eyeballs.”

Reply

interstate movers July 21, 2009 at 2:56 pm

I’m more excited to find out the outcome of this untitled art project reality tv. @ Amory Blaine, your’re right, “this could either be very good, or very very terribly bad. For art. For artists. For eyeballs.”

Reply

interstate movers July 21, 2009 at 9:56 am

I’m more excited to find out the outcome of this untitled art project reality tv. @ Amory Blaine, your’re right, “this could either be very good, or very very terribly bad. For art. For artists. For eyeballs.”

Reply

manuel g August 24, 2009 at 9:36 pm

Depending on nothing.

Reality show for artist is just the best thing ever!
Great chance for artist to publish and great chance to discover the new Duchamp’s!

Art on comercial mainstream tv that’s just perfect.

Competion,
Art award,
Money and fame!
+ the TV comunity gets an eye on arts.
maybe even educated.

would like to be a bord member of that organisation.

Reply

manuel g August 24, 2009 at 9:36 pm

Depending on nothing.

Reality show for artist is just the best thing ever!
Great chance for artist to publish and great chance to discover the new Duchamp’s!

Art on comercial mainstream tv that’s just perfect.

Competion,
Art award,
Money and fame!
+ the TV comunity gets an eye on arts.
maybe even educated.

would like to be a bord member of that organisation.

Reply

manuel g August 24, 2009 at 9:36 pm

Depending on nothing.

Reality show for artist is just the best thing ever!
Great chance for artist to publish and great chance to discover the new Duchamp’s!

Art on comercial mainstream tv that’s just perfect.

Competion,
Art award,
Money and fame!
+ the TV comunity gets an eye on arts.
maybe even educated.

would like to be a bord member of that organisation.

Reply

manuel g August 24, 2009 at 9:36 pm

Depending on nothing.

Reality show for artist is just the best thing ever!
Great chance for artist to publish and great chance to discover the new Duchamp’s!

Art on comercial mainstream tv that’s just perfect.

Competion,
Art award,
Money and fame!
+ the TV comunity gets an eye on arts.
maybe even educated.

would like to be a bord member of that organisation.

Reply

manuel g August 24, 2009 at 4:36 pm

Depending on nothing.

Reality show for artist is just the best thing ever!
Great chance for artist to publish and great chance to discover the new Duchamp’s!

Art on comercial mainstream tv that’s just perfect.

Competion,
Art award,
Money and fame!
+ the TV comunity gets an eye on arts.
maybe even educated.

would like to be a bord member of that organisation.

Reply

lauraj December 18, 2009 at 6:22 am

Although I strongly believe that art and artists needs to be integrated more into American culture, I am not so sure this is the way to go about it. I think that concept will inevitably be downplayed in comparison to “technical skill” (in quotes, because it is SO subjective as to what exactly that is), which may ultimately put the artists in a position where they are forced to compromise their artistic integrity and aesthetic point of view. Unlike Fashion, art is not required to be functional, trendy or -god forbid-mass manufactured. What the art world needs now is grounding and structure, not imitation or quickly produced, poorly thought out work so that an artist is able to “win” an opportunity to show their work… This concept really just goes against what I think artists- at least the ones we might consider Masters of art- are trying to accomplish, which is to send a message- convey ideas that go beyond words- immortalize the times and events in which they live. These are things that cannot be rushed, cannot be temporal- a lifetime may not be long enough to truly succeed at this, let alone an 8 week reality tv show. I am very afraid for the sincerity of art in the future. Although in regards to mass media and pop culture art is considered a lesser of the artistic endeavors -under music and fashion mainly- i think the mystique of art should be preserved for its sake. Most of America knows VERY little about art and once it hits the mainstream, people will feel like they know everything about it because they saw it on TV. Sorry SJP, but i dont think this one is gonna fly- at least not in a good way for us true and deeply committed artists.

Reply

lauraj December 18, 2009 at 6:22 am

Although I strongly believe that art and artists needs to be integrated more into American culture, I am not so sure this is the way to go about it. I think that concept will inevitably be downplayed in comparison to “technical skill” (in quotes, because it is SO subjective as to what exactly that is), which may ultimately put the artists in a position where they are forced to compromise their artistic integrity and aesthetic point of view. Unlike Fashion, art is not required to be functional, trendy or -god forbid-mass manufactured. What the art world needs now is grounding and structure, not imitation or quickly produced, poorly thought out work so that an artist is able to “win” an opportunity to show their work… This concept really just goes against what I think artists- at least the ones we might consider Masters of art- are trying to accomplish, which is to send a message- convey ideas that go beyond words- immortalize the times and events in which they live. These are things that cannot be rushed, cannot be temporal- a lifetime may not be long enough to truly succeed at this, let alone an 8 week reality tv show. I am very afraid for the sincerity of art in the future. Although in regards to mass media and pop culture art is considered a lesser of the artistic endeavors -under music and fashion mainly- i think the mystique of art should be preserved for its sake. Most of America knows VERY little about art and once it hits the mainstream, people will feel like they know everything about it because they saw it on TV. Sorry SJP, but i dont think this one is gonna fly- at least not in a good way for us true and deeply committed artists.

Reply

lauraj December 18, 2009 at 6:22 am

Although I strongly believe that art and artists needs to be integrated more into American culture, I am not so sure this is the way to go about it. I think that concept will inevitably be downplayed in comparison to “technical skill” (in quotes, because it is SO subjective as to what exactly that is), which may ultimately put the artists in a position where they are forced to compromise their artistic integrity and aesthetic point of view. Unlike Fashion, art is not required to be functional, trendy or -god forbid-mass manufactured. What the art world needs now is grounding and structure, not imitation or quickly produced, poorly thought out work so that an artist is able to “win” an opportunity to show their work… This concept really just goes against what I think artists- at least the ones we might consider Masters of art- are trying to accomplish, which is to send a message- convey ideas that go beyond words- immortalize the times and events in which they live. These are things that cannot be rushed, cannot be temporal- a lifetime may not be long enough to truly succeed at this, let alone an 8 week reality tv show. I am very afraid for the sincerity of art in the future. Although in regards to mass media and pop culture art is considered a lesser of the artistic endeavors -under music and fashion mainly- i think the mystique of art should be preserved for its sake. Most of America knows VERY little about art and once it hits the mainstream, people will feel like they know everything about it because they saw it on TV. Sorry SJP, but i dont think this one is gonna fly- at least not in a good way for us true and deeply committed artists.

Reply

lauraj December 18, 2009 at 2:22 am

Although I strongly believe that art and artists needs to be integrated more into American culture, I am not so sure this is the way to go about it. I think that concept will inevitably be downplayed in comparison to “technical skill” (in quotes, because it is SO subjective as to what exactly that is), which may ultimately put the artists in a position where they are forced to compromise their artistic integrity and aesthetic point of view. Unlike Fashion, art is not required to be functional, trendy or -god forbid-mass manufactured. What the art world needs now is grounding and structure, not imitation or quickly produced, poorly thought out work so that an artist is able to “win” an opportunity to show their work… This concept really just goes against what I think artists- at least the ones we might consider Masters of art- are trying to accomplish, which is to send a message- convey ideas that go beyond words- immortalize the times and events in which they live. These are things that cannot be rushed, cannot be temporal- a lifetime may not be long enough to truly succeed at this, let alone an 8 week reality tv show. I am very afraid for the sincerity of art in the future. Although in regards to mass media and pop culture art is considered a lesser of the artistic endeavors -under music and fashion mainly- i think the mystique of art should be preserved for its sake. Most of America knows VERY little about art and once it hits the mainstream, people will feel like they know everything about it because they saw it on TV. Sorry SJP, but i dont think this one is gonna fly- at least not in a good way for us true and deeply committed artists.

Reply

Gio Leedy August 4, 2010 at 1:40 am

This reality show has been absolutely fantastic, both in entertainment and in education. As an artist, it’s been great to see what these artists are thinking and creating, as well as what the art world is looking for. Bravo!

Reply

Gio Leedy August 4, 2010 at 1:40 am

This reality show has been absolutely fantastic, both in entertainment and in education. As an artist, it’s been great to see what these artists are thinking and creating, as well as what the art world is looking for. Bravo!

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Gio Leedy August 4, 2010 at 1:40 am

This reality show has been absolutely fantastic, both in entertainment and in education. As an artist, it’s been great to see what these artists are thinking and creating, as well as what the art world is looking for. Bravo!

Reply

Gio Leedy August 3, 2010 at 9:40 pm

This reality show has been absolutely fantastic, both in entertainment and in education. As an artist, it’s been great to see what these artists are thinking and creating, as well as what the art world is looking for. Bravo!

Reply

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