The Work of Art Recap: Natural Talents Produces Only One Bare Ass

by Paddy Johnson on August 5, 2010 · 188 comments WANGA

Miles Mendenhall gets ready for another day at the studio

“Do you think Captain Crunch would make a good dad?” asks Miles Mendenhall, uttering the first words in this week’s episode of Work of Art. The question is of no relevance to this week’s challenge — incorporate stuff you’ve found on your trip to woods into your work — but, this, coupled with a shot of Mendenhall‘s bare ass is the episode’s only moment not completely riddled with cliche (though the latter point may be debatable). Two seconds after Mr. Crunch is discussed Bill Powers enters wearing his sunglasses indoors, an annoying affectation even if he falls in line with everyone else who is either dressed by Bravo, or wearing giant metallic bows or bunny ears for the camera. I’m fairly certain the show gave critic Jerry Saltz a pair of Puma sneakers as I’ve never seen him wear them out gallery hopping.

abdi farah, art fag city

Abdi Farah, Baptism, 2009

Jaclyn Santos proves insufferable this challenge, whining about her cold and anything else she could think of, Miles ultimately sees the error in his ways and decides that mustard gas should not be created in a public studio space, while Abdi Farah mixes his black rocks found in the woods with some pigment, saying he’ll take “charcoal drawing to the next level”. He didn’t do it, but his Saltz dubbed “Palm Beach art fair” frame and drawing still managed to win this week’s show. I suspect it’s no coincidence that this academic figurative work meets almost every cliche of what “art” should look like.

Jaclyn santos, art fag city

Jaclyn Santos, The End, 2009

Speaking of the expected, after Jaclyn sulked about not being able to cheat on her challenge by using work produced in off hours, she ended up getting eliminated with a set of photographic landscapes with a horizontal pole and a rock in the center as a horizon line. The pole as a compositional device showcased more imagination than we typically see from her, though I’m not sure why her piece needed two horizon lines. It’s not like her photographs didn’t already have one. As for the spat with her colleagues, Santos published a giant list of exceptions to the rules granted to others listed on her blog. Readers will have to forgive me for not buying the idea that being able to use a material not included in a particular challenge is equivalent to taking more time than all the other artists.

nicole nadeau, art fag city

Nicole Nadeau, Mic Mac, 2009

Leap mid-episode and Simon de Pury is dolling out his usual advice. “I wonder whether at that scale the piece will be powerful enough to impress the judges” de Pury tells Nicole Nadeau. This is the bias of an auctioneer who sells work for more the bigger it is and wouldn’t have been a solution even if Nadeau had been able to manage it. It would have just been a larger hippy air-fresher.  I hate to say it, but she needed to start over.

Peregrine Honig, Golden Gate, 2009

Nearby Peregrine Honig took a slightly more original approach to nature, even if it was never resolved. I’m not a fan of tree people sculptures in general, but I at least enjoyed Honig’s initial description as “a really annoying teenaged mother nature”. This was unfortunately derailed after a critique with Simon de Pury and Miles’ poor idea that kids sneaking off into the woods would help the piece. Enter the bad illustration drawings. Next thing we see is a tree figure with more figures. They are mostly having sex, an insubstantial addition to a piece that clearly needed another couple of days in the studio.

Not until the crits do we meet this week’s guest judge Michele Oka Doner, an artist who’s career is marred by cliche work and representation by Marlborough Gallery Chelsea. Predictably, she loves Abdi’s work and offers up some of the most insubstantial feedback I’ve seen from a judge. “I looked at it and it’s really your heart and soul” Michele Oka Doner tells Farah. She doesn’t mention that his heart and soul offered up a very literal interpretation of baptism and rebirth.

As for the results, next week we’ll see the three solo shows of remaining contestants Miles, Peregrine and Abdi. Abdi should have been knocked out this week, but whatever. At least we don’t have to look at any more of Santos work.

Also:

THE REAL WINNER

art fag city, miles mendenhall

Miles Mendenhall, Fungus Study Vol. 1 #1

Even if Miles didn’t produce his strongest work, it was still the best of the lot. It was a little over produced, but I liked that the problem of what how his materials would react was in question enough that it didn’t produce very interesting results. I am also comforted by the artist’s own reflections on the work. “Seeing the work I’m a little queasy. I’m really self-conscious about being young and to compensate for that I try to do as much as I can, and at a certain point it’s too much. If I make it into the finale I’m not going to make that mistake again.”

Like there was any question. Speaking of which, I look forward to seeing his show at the Brooklyn Museum.

  • Aim

    Nice recap.
    Miles fleeting ass flash was far more compelling than Jaclyn’s weekly disrobing.
    Sometimes less is more.

  • Aim

    Nice recap.
    Miles fleeting ass flash was far more compelling than Jaclyn’s weekly disrobing.
    Sometimes less is more.

  • Aim

    Nice recap.
    Miles fleeting ass flash was far more compelling than Jaclyn’s weekly disrobing.
    Sometimes less is more.

  • Aim

    Nice recap.
    Miles fleeting ass flash was far more compelling than Jaclyn’s weekly disrobing.
    Sometimes less is more.

  • http://studioconcrete.wordpress.com/ KatieK

    I thought it was weird when China Chow (in her winter cape) tells the contestants that the winner will receive $100,000 – but she clearly forgot to mention the sponsor – so they cut away to a back shot of her with an obviously tacked-on voice-over reciting “courtesy of PrismaColor: Art Uninhibited!”.

  • http://studioconcrete.wordpress.com/ KatieK

    I thought it was weird when China Chow (in her winter cape) tells the contestants that the winner will receive $100,000 – but she clearly forgot to mention the sponsor – so they cut away to a back shot of her with an obviously tacked-on voice-over reciting “courtesy of PrismaColor: Art Uninhibited!”.

  • http://studioconcrete.wordpress.com/ KatieK

    I thought it was weird when China Chow (in her winter cape) tells the contestants that the winner will receive $100,000 – but she clearly forgot to mention the sponsor – so they cut away to a back shot of her with an obviously tacked-on voice-over reciting “courtesy of PrismaColor: Art Uninhibited!”.

  • http://studioconcrete.wordpress.com/ KatieK

    I thought it was weird when China Chow (in her winter cape) tells the contestants that the winner will receive $100,000 – but she clearly forgot to mention the sponsor – so they cut away to a back shot of her with an obviously tacked-on voice-over reciting “courtesy of PrismaColor: Art Uninhibited!”.

  • http://studioconcrete.wordpress.com/ KatieK

    I thought it was weird when China Chow (in her winter cape) tells the contestants that the winner will receive $100,000 – but she clearly forgot to mention the sponsor – so they cut away to a back shot of her with an obviously tacked-on voice-over reciting “courtesy of PrismaColor: Art Uninhibited!”.

  • Fiver

    Hmm from Santos’ facebook fanpage, her recent show:
    http://www.facebook.com/jaclyn.santos.work.of.art#!/photo.php?pid=332682&id=113836531968710&ref=album

    Garnered from Miles in last week’s show? Enamel instead of tar, perhaps she preferred that smell.

  • Fiver

    Hmm from Santos’ facebook fanpage, her recent show:
    http://www.facebook.com/jaclyn.santos.work.of.art#!/photo.php?pid=332682&id=113836531968710&ref=album

    Garnered from Miles in last week’s show? Enamel instead of tar, perhaps she preferred that smell.

  • Fiver

    Hmm from Santos’ facebook fanpage, her recent show:
    http://www.facebook.com/jaclyn.santos.work.of.art#!/photo.php?pid=332682&id=113836531968710&ref=album

    Garnered from Miles in last week’s show? Enamel instead of tar, perhaps she preferred that smell.

  • Fiver

    Hmm from Santos’ facebook fanpage, her recent show:
    http://www.facebook.com/jaclyn.santos.work.of.art#!/photo.php?pid=332682&id=113836531968710&ref=album

    Garnered from Miles in last week’s show? Enamel instead of tar, perhaps she preferred that smell.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

    I’m going to stick up for JACKIE here regarding the list she put on her blog where contestants stretched the original limits of a challenge and were not penalized because they “asked the others”, as they were instructed to do. So apparently she was not being out of line to do that on this episode and was unfairly edited. I know editing is part of the game, but It’s not nice to edit someone as a (wanna-be) cheat. When I was there I saw a few things that were slipping by, but calling someone out was a sure way to lose friends. It’s a tough spot. Personally I think all the exceptions to the rules should have been vetoed…

    Here’s Jackie’s list:

    *Miles’ giant machine exceeded allotted dimensions in the gallery. Everyone “agreed” he could display it anyway.
    *The photograph for Miles’ Audi challenge piece wasn’t even taken the same day as that challenge. Yet he was never even questioned about it or required to ask others’ permission.
    *Peregrine was required to ask all of us if she could use newspaper to paper mache her pony in the child challenge, because newspaper was not one of the supplies we had available.
    *Erik was required to ask us if he could use a photograph of his girlfriend he brought with him from home during the Audi challenge.

    • artfagcity

      I didn’t interpret her asking the other artists if she could do something like that as out of line — I just assumed there were other instances in which stuff like this would have to be worked out. Ultimately though, you have to present a compelling case for yourself, and while discussion was probably a little more involved, the group dynamics were such that she didn’t win that battle. In that sense it’s like Survival and it’s just part of the game.

      Like you I’m inclined to think all exceptions should have been vetoed but that’s the way these things go I guess. I remember someone on Project Runway got disqualified for bringing a book of designs with him a while back and not telling anyone. I wonder if they were as strict about the rules there.

      • artfagcity

        Admittedly though I may have been unfairly harsh on Jackie. More than anyone else, her enduring presence on the show has annoyed me — even without the producer’s hands I think she erodes the progress made by feminists. She seems obsessed with displaying her femininity but has no vision about what that might look like past outdated stereotypes: She’s the powerless victim, she’s well suited for childbearing, she’s indecisive and needs direction (typically from men).

        So even if the cheating was pervasive and she suffered unduly, I have a hard time feeling any sympathy.

        • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

          I don’t fall for the sympathy card much, which is what came between me and Jackie from day one, but I’m using this particular story to point out that because I saw the whole thing as “a game”, I also think games are best played and enjoyed with consistent rules. There was a huge range of different materials that each contestant brought with them, within guidelines, but those lines were broad and wavy. And then there was the “supply room”, which was stocked “in a way”, and the 3 computers and printers being shared by everyone, with no time slots. Finally the SPECIAL RULE that everything you didn’t use from a challenge (from art or hardware store) was to be put into the Supply Room afterwards…(honor system) So gradually there was who-knows-what in there, or in people’s work spaces.

          I think it would be more fun to really limit the materials, give each person the same few items and then see what they do.

    • artfagcity

      I didn’t interpret her asking the other artists if she could do something like that as out of line — I just assumed there were other instances in which stuff like this would have to be worked out. Ultimately though, you have to present a compelling case for yourself, and while discussion was probably a little more involved, the group dynamics were such that she didn’t win that battle. In that sense it’s like Survival and it’s just part of the game.

      Like you I’m inclined to think all exceptions should have been vetoed but that’s the way these things go I guess. I remember someone on Project Runway got disqualified for bringing a book of designs with him a while back and not telling anyone. I wonder if they were as strict about the rules there.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

    I’m going to stick up for JACKIE here regarding the list she put on her blog where contestants stretched the original limits of a challenge and were not penalized because they “asked the others”, as they were instructed to do. So apparently she was not being out of line to do that on this episode and was unfairly edited. I know editing is part of the game, but It’s not nice to edit someone as a (wanna-be) cheat. When I was there I saw a few things that were slipping by, but calling someone out was a sure way to lose friends. It’s a tough spot. Personally I think all the exceptions to the rules should have been vetoed…

    Here’s Jackie’s list:

    *Miles’ giant machine exceeded allotted dimensions in the gallery. Everyone “agreed” he could display it anyway.
    *The photograph for Miles’ Audi challenge piece wasn’t even taken the same day as that challenge. Yet he was never even questioned about it or required to ask others’ permission.
    *Peregrine was required to ask all of us if she could use newspaper to paper mache her pony in the child challenge, because newspaper was not one of the supplies we had available.
    *Erik was required to ask us if he could use a photograph of his girlfriend he brought with him from home during the Audi challenge.

    • artfagcity

      I didn’t interpret her asking the other artists if she could do something like that as out of line — I just assumed there were other instances in which stuff like this would have to be worked out. Ultimately though, you have to present a compelling case for yourself, and while discussion was probably a little more involved, the group dynamics were such that she didn’t win that battle. In that sense it’s like Survival and it’s just part of the game.

      Like you I’m inclined to think all exceptions should have been vetoed but that’s the way these things go I guess. I remember someone on Project Runway got disqualified for bringing a book of designs with him a while back and not telling anyone. I wonder if they were as strict about the rules there.

      • artfagcity

        Admittedly though I may have been unfairly harsh on Jackie. More than anyone else, her enduring presence on the show has annoyed me — even without the producer’s hands I think she erodes the progress made by feminists. She seems obsessed with displaying her femininity but has no vision about what that might look like past outdated stereotypes: She’s the powerless victim, she’s well suited for childbearing, she’s indecisive and needs direction (typically from men).

        So even if the cheating was pervasive and she suffered unduly, I have a hard time feeling any sympathy.

        • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

          I don’t fall for the sympathy card much, which is what came between me and Jackie from day one, but I’m using this particular story to point out that because I saw the whole thing as “a game”, I also think games are best played and enjoyed with consistent rules. There was a huge range of different materials that each contestant brought with them, within guidelines, but those lines were broad and wavy. And then there was the “supply room”, which was stocked “in a way”, and the 3 computers and printers being shared by everyone, with no time slots. Finally the SPECIAL RULE that everything you didn’t use from a challenge (from art or hardware store) was to be put into the Supply Room afterwards…(honor system) So gradually there was who-knows-what in there, or in people’s work spaces.

          I think it would be more fun to really limit the materials, give each person the same few items and then see what they do.

  • chevronnine

    So… how is it that Miles, a country boy from Minnesota, has almost no tan lines? I’m not complaining — I’d hit that six ways from Sunday — just wondering.

  • chevronnine

    So… how is it that Miles, a country boy from Minnesota, has almost no tan lines? I’m not complaining — I’d hit that six ways from Sunday — just wondering.

  • chevronnine

    So… how is it that Miles, a country boy from Minnesota, has almost no tan lines? I’m not complaining — I’d hit that six ways from Sunday — just wondering.

  • chevronnine

    So… how is it that Miles, a country boy from Minnesota, has almost no tan lines? I’m not complaining — I’d hit that six ways from Sunday — just wondering.

  • chevronnine

    So… how is it that Miles, a country boy from Minnesota, has almost no tan lines? I’m not complaining — I’d hit that six ways from Sunday — just wondering.

  • Not Ben

    Whoever wins is going to feel the pressure of the solo show. A lot of hype surrounding this thing! Brravvooo!

  • Not Ben

    Whoever wins is going to feel the pressure of the solo show. A lot of hype surrounding this thing! Brravvooo!

  • Not Ben

    Whoever wins is going to feel the pressure of the solo show. A lot of hype surrounding this thing! Brravvooo!

  • http://www.daingore.com/ Dain Q Gore

    I’m no chemist, but I lost even more respect for Miles when he wanted to make “Mustard Gas” without thinking of the consequences. You work in a studio with others, you spray your fixative outside, let alone combine your hazardous materials! That’s standard etiquette and common human decency. Mad Scientist, indeed!

    • Son of Mecha Mummy

      I think the odds of Miles actually ever being serious about that idea are so slim. It strikes me as another one of his reality TV character quirks.

    • Son of Mecha Mummy

      I think the odds of Miles actually ever being serious about that idea are so slim. It strikes me as another one of his reality TV character quirks.

    • Son of Mecha Mummy

      I think the odds of Miles actually ever being serious about that idea are so slim. It strikes me as another one of his reality TV character quirks.

      • sarae

        Yes, it was obvious he was joking around to get air-time.

    • flossy

      It actually makes chlorine gas, but whatever. That stuff is nasty too.

  • http://www.daingore.com/ Dain Q Gore

    I’m no chemist, but I lost even more respect for Miles when he wanted to make “Mustard Gas” without thinking of the consequences. You work in a studio with others, you spray your fixative outside, let alone combine your hazardous materials! That’s standard etiquette and common human decency. Mad Scientist, indeed!

    • Son of Mecha Mummy

      I think the odds of Miles actually ever being serious about that idea are so slim. It strikes me as another one of his reality TV character quirks.

      • sarae

        Yes, it was obvious he was joking around to get air-time.

    • flossy

      It actually makes chlorine gas, but whatever. That stuff is nasty too.

  • m

    I thought it was lame that the other contestants seemed upset about Jackie asking to use the photo. If you believe in your own work then what’s the big deal? Besides, I doubt it would have helped J anyway….What’s the difference if she takes the photo at night or during “studio time”?…My best ideas come when I’m not “working”

    ps. What a shame that the only female guest judge was so bad. Shit, D. Butterfield would have been better.

    • Michelle P.

      Agreed m. A lot of problem solving and ideas come when we are out of the studio.

      I sort of wish Jaclyn had gone out with less of a whimper. Both she and Trong were portrayed as being lazy on the couch during their voted-off episode. Miles smartly diverted that problem by sleeping just about every where else.

      I loved Abdi’s drawing sans frame, but don’t think his work will be substantial enough compared to what Miles and Peregrine put together. Also, he might have considered removing his shorts for the Baptism. I am excited to see Peregrine’s work now as she moves into sculpture. She might have learned that tiny cut-out figures don’t work so well since Jamie Lynn already tried that to disastrous results. That Nicole chose to make molds so often on this show is astonishing, given how much time that takes to do. This is proof that working with materials takes time. I am looking forward to what everyone makes when they have longer time to work on their pieces.

      Bring back Nao! She would be a great contender for the Brooklyn Museum.

    • Michelle P.

      Agreed m. A lot of problem solving and ideas come when we are out of the studio.

      I sort of wish Jaclyn had gone out with less of a whimper. Both she and Trong were portrayed as being lazy on the couch during their voted-off episode. Miles smartly diverted that problem by sleeping just about every where else.

      I loved Abdi’s drawing sans frame, but don’t think his work will be substantial enough compared to what Miles and Peregrine put together. Also, he might have considered removing his shorts for the Baptism. I am excited to see Peregrine’s work now as she moves into sculpture. She might have learned that tiny cut-out figures don’t work so well since Jamie Lynn already tried that to disastrous results. That Nicole chose to make molds so often on this show is astonishing, given how much time that takes to do. This is proof that working with materials takes time. I am looking forward to what everyone makes when they have longer time to work on their pieces.

      Bring back Nao! She would be a great contender for the Brooklyn Museum.

      • artfagcity

        I didn’t think Jaclyn looked lazy. She was whine-y about her cold, but the sleeping itself didn’t look bad to me. That’s what you do when you’re sick right?

        Anyway, a bunch of contestants talk about getting ideas in their downtime. That’s fine. It’s the working in the downtime that’s not cool. I mean, you see how frequently they’re down to the wire. To me that’s more significant. That said, as Judith mentions, I think it would have been better if no rule bending occurred.

    • Michelle P.

      Agreed m. A lot of problem solving and ideas come when we are out of the studio.

      I sort of wish Jaclyn had gone out with less of a whimper. Both she and Trong were portrayed as being lazy on the couch during their voted-off episode. Miles smartly diverted that problem by sleeping just about every where else.

      I loved Abdi’s drawing sans frame, but don’t think his work will be substantial enough compared to what Miles and Peregrine put together. Also, he might have considered removing his shorts for the Baptism. I am excited to see Peregrine’s work now as she moves into sculpture. She might have learned that tiny cut-out figures don’t work so well since Jamie Lynn already tried that to disastrous results. That Nicole chose to make molds so often on this show is astonishing, given how much time that takes to do. This is proof that working with materials takes time. I am looking forward to what everyone makes when they have longer time to work on their pieces.

      Bring back Nao! She would be a great contender for the Brooklyn Museum.

  • m

    I thought it was lame that the other contestants seemed upset about Jackie asking to use the photo. If you believe in your own work then what’s the big deal? Besides, I doubt it would have helped J anyway….What’s the difference if she takes the photo at night or during “studio time”?…My best ideas come when I’m not “working”

    ps. What a shame that the only female guest judge was so bad. Shit, D. Butterfield would have been better.

  • m

    I thought it was lame that the other contestants seemed upset about Jackie asking to use the photo. If you believe in your own work then what’s the big deal? Besides, I doubt it would have helped J anyway….What’s the difference if she takes the photo at night or during “studio time”?…My best ideas come when I’m not “working”

    ps. What a shame that the only female guest judge was so bad. Shit, D. Butterfield would have been better.

  • m

    I thought it was lame that the other contestants seemed upset about Jackie asking to use the photo. If you believe in your own work then what’s the big deal? Besides, I doubt it would have helped J anyway….What’s the difference if she takes the photo at night or during “studio time”?…My best ideas come when I’m not “working”

    ps. What a shame that the only female guest judge was so bad. Shit, D. Butterfield would have been better.

    • Michelle P.

      Agreed m. A lot of problem solving and ideas come when we are out of the studio.

      I sort of wish Jaclyn had gone out with less of a whimper. Both she and Trong were portrayed as being lazy on the couch during their voted-off episode. Miles smartly diverted that problem by sleeping just about every where else.

      I loved Abdi’s drawing sans frame, but don’t think his work will be substantial enough compared to what Miles and Peregrine put together. Also, he might have considered removing his shorts for the Baptism. I am excited to see Peregrine’s work now as she moves into sculpture. She might have learned that tiny cut-out figures don’t work so well since Jamie Lynn already tried that to disastrous results. That Nicole chose to make molds so often on this show is astonishing, given how much time that takes to do. This is proof that working with materials takes time. I am looking forward to what everyone makes when they have longer time to work on their pieces.

      Bring back Nao! She would be a great contender for the Brooklyn Museum.

      • artfagcity

        I didn’t think Jaclyn looked lazy. She was whine-y about her cold, but the sleeping itself didn’t look bad to me. That’s what you do when you’re sick right?

        Anyway, a bunch of contestants talk about getting ideas in their downtime. That’s fine. It’s the working in the downtime that’s not cool. I mean, you see how frequently they’re down to the wire. To me that’s more significant. That said, as Judith mentions, I think it would have been better if no rule bending occurred.

  • http://www.roygreenart.blogspot.com royston

    I liked the drawing by abdi..it at least it showed some technical skill…glad to see nicole’s hippie art get the boot…peregrine is interesting and scary in a good way..miles is so mfa grad school..i think peregrine will win…

  • http://www.roygreenart.blogspot.com royston

    I liked the drawing by abdi..it at least it showed some technical skill…glad to see nicole’s hippie art get the boot…peregrine is interesting and scary in a good way..miles is so mfa grad school..i think peregrine will win…

  • http://www.roygreenart.blogspot.com royston

    I liked the drawing by abdi..it at least it showed some technical skill…glad to see nicole’s hippie art get the boot…peregrine is interesting and scary in a good way..miles is so mfa grad school..i think peregrine will win…

  • http://www.roygreenart.blogspot.com royston

    I liked the drawing by abdi..it at least it showed some technical skill…glad to see nicole’s hippie art get the boot…peregrine is interesting and scary in a good way..miles is so mfa grad school..i think peregrine will win…

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com judith Braun

    Anyone think there’s an uncanny similarity between Abdi’s baptism figure drawing and the reclining figures of Kehinde Wiley at Deitch 2008 show? There were several, one called Veiled Christ, all large, horizontal compositions.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com judith Braun

    Anyone think there’s an uncanny similarity between Abdi’s baptism figure drawing and the reclining figures of Kehinde Wiley at Deitch 2008 show? There were several, one called Veiled Christ, all large, horizontal compositions.

    • sarcasatire

      I see no similarities between Abdi’s and Wiliey’s work other than the fact that the composition is horizontal and they both feature black men. The emotonal tone of both differ greatly. Plus, Wiley’s scthick is that he references classical paintings. I’ve seen pieces of his that resemble the Pieta, and other works, almost exactly. The difference is that his subjects are young black men dressed in urban streetwear. Could it be said that Abdi was, if anything, referencing a classic work and not Wiley?

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com judith Braun

    Anyone think there’s an uncanny similarity between Abdi’s baptism figure drawing and the reclining figures of Kehinde Wiley at Deitch 2008 show? There were several, one called Veiled Christ, all large, horizontal compositions.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com judith Braun

    Anyone think there’s an uncanny similarity between Abdi’s baptism figure drawing and the reclining figures of Kehinde Wiley at Deitch 2008 show? There were several, one called Veiled Christ, all large, horizontal compositions.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com judith Braun

    Anyone think there’s an uncanny similarity between Abdi’s baptism figure drawing and the reclining figures of Kehinde Wiley at Deitch 2008 show? There were several, one called Veiled Christ, all large, horizontal compositions.

    • sarcasatire

      I see no similarities between Abdi’s and Wiliey’s work other than the fact that the composition is horizontal and they both feature black men. The emotonal tone of both differ greatly. Plus, Wiley’s scthick is that he references classical paintings. I’ve seen pieces of his that resemble the Pieta, and other works, almost exactly. The difference is that his subjects are young black men dressed in urban streetwear. Could it be said that Abdi was, if anything, referencing a classic work and not Wiley?

  • jen

    I don’t think Miles really had any intention of actually making mustard gas. I mean, what was he going to do with it once he’d made it? I think it was all just part of his ‘oooh I’m such a crazy, experimental artist, aren’t I quirky’ act.

  • jen

    I don’t think Miles really had any intention of actually making mustard gas. I mean, what was he going to do with it once he’d made it? I think it was all just part of his ‘oooh I’m such a crazy, experimental artist, aren’t I quirky’ act.

    • http://jeffevans.carbonmade.com Jeff Evans

      The fact that Miles would even talk about creating mustard gas in the studio, whether or not he had any intention of doing so, is indicative of some sociopathic tendencies. Mustard gas is a chemical weapon used in World War I. Its effects include irritation and burning of the eyes, even blindness, blistering of the skin, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. It is particularly insidious because its effects aren’t immediately apparent and may take a few hours or a day before they show up.

      • Dina

        That’s a pretty big leap from “making a not particularly funny joke” or “playing up to the cameras” to “sociopath.”

      • Dina

        That’s a pretty big leap from “making a not particularly funny joke” or “playing up to the cameras” to “sociopath.”

      • Dina

        That’s a pretty big leap from “making a not particularly funny joke” or “playing up to the cameras” to “sociopath.”

      • flossy

        Did nobody take two seconds to look this up? Bleach + Ammonia =/= mustard gas! It can create chlorine gas, which is certainly nasty, but NOT mustard gas which is far worse.

        Besides, Miles was obviously joking, and that does not a sociopath make.

        • http://www.artfagcity.com Art Fag City

          I didn’t think to look it up. I mean, once you know, it’s obvious you should have, but it probably wasn’t the first thing most people thought of. I didn’t even think too carefully about whether he’d actually planned to do it. It was clear to me that was never going to happen regardless of his plans, so I just dismissed the entire narrative as show filler.

    • http://jeffevans.carbonmade.com Jeff Evans

      The fact that Miles would even talk about creating mustard gas in the studio, whether or not he had any intention of doing so, is indicative of some sociopathic tendencies. Mustard gas is a chemical weapon used in World War I. Its effects include irritation and burning of the eyes, even blindness, blistering of the skin, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. It is particularly insidious because its effects aren’t immediately apparent and may take a few hours or a day before they show up.

    • http://jeffevans.carbonmade.com Jeff Evans

      The fact that Miles would even talk about creating mustard gas in the studio, whether or not he had any intention of doing so, is indicative of some sociopathic tendencies. Mustard gas is a chemical weapon used in World War I. Its effects include irritation and burning of the eyes, even blindness, blistering of the skin, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. It is particularly insidious because its effects aren’t immediately apparent and may take a few hours or a day before they show up.

    • http://jeffevans.carbonmade.com Jeff Evans

      The fact that Miles would even talk about creating mustard gas in the studio, whether or not he had any intention of doing so, is indicative of some sociopathic tendencies. Mustard gas is a chemical weapon used in World War I. Its effects include irritation and burning of the eyes, even blindness, blistering of the skin, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. It is particularly insidious because its effects aren’t immediately apparent and may take a few hours or a day before they show up.

  • jen

    I don’t think Miles really had any intention of actually making mustard gas. I mean, what was he going to do with it once he’d made it? I think it was all just part of his ‘oooh I’m such a crazy, experimental artist, aren’t I quirky’ act.

  • jen

    I don’t think Miles really had any intention of actually making mustard gas. I mean, what was he going to do with it once he’d made it? I think it was all just part of his ‘oooh I’m such a crazy, experimental artist, aren’t I quirky’ act.

    • http://jeffevans.carbonmade.com Jeff Evans

      The fact that Miles would even talk about creating mustard gas in the studio, whether or not he had any intention of doing so, is indicative of some sociopathic tendencies. Mustard gas is a chemical weapon used in World War I. Its effects include irritation and burning of the eyes, even blindness, blistering of the skin, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. It is particularly insidious because its effects aren’t immediately apparent and may take a few hours or a day before they show up.

      • Dina

        That’s a pretty big leap from “making a not particularly funny joke” or “playing up to the cameras” to “sociopath.”

      • flossy

        Did nobody take two seconds to look this up? Bleach + Ammonia =/= mustard gas! It can create chlorine gas, which is certainly nasty, but NOT mustard gas which is far worse.

        Besides, Miles was obviously joking, and that does not a sociopath make.

        • http://www.artfagcity.com Art Fag City

          I didn’t think to look it up. I mean, once you know, it’s obvious you should have, but it probably wasn’t the first thing most people thought of. I didn’t even think too carefully about whether he’d actually planned to do it. It was clear to me that was never going to happen regardless of his plans, so I just dismissed the entire narrative as show filler.

  • peps

    for non-north american readers, especially those without tvs, the amount of coverage of this show is really tiresome. i had to take afc off my rss reader! :(

    • artfagcity

      The show ends next week. You can resubscribe then.

  • peps

    for non-north american readers, especially those without tvs, the amount of coverage of this show is really tiresome. i had to take afc off my rss reader! :(

  • peps

    for non-north american readers, especially those without tvs, the amount of coverage of this show is really tiresome. i had to take afc off my rss reader! :(

    • artfagcity

      The show ends next week. You can resubscribe then.

  • atonaladam

    Holbein’s Dead Christ is loved by so many painters (many profiles of a dead Christ also exist). Wiley and Abdi are totally different artists. The difference between him and Wiley is overt and I think the problem for people is learning to see the differences. That, to me, is a shame as it is those differences that are critical in art. I don’t believe one can claim a subject. It also wouldn’t surprise me if Abdi, a Christian, was unaware of Wiley’s work because so many dead Christs exist in art history/imagery.

  • atonaladam

    Holbein’s Dead Christ is loved by so many painters (many profiles of a dead Christ also exist). Wiley and Abdi are totally different artists. The difference between him and Wiley is overt and I think the problem for people is learning to see the differences. That, to me, is a shame as it is those differences that are critical in art. I don’t believe one can claim a subject. It also wouldn’t surprise me if Abdi, a Christian, was unaware of Wiley’s work because so many dead Christs exist in art history/imagery.

  • atonaladam

    Holbein’s Dead Christ is loved by so many painters (many profiles of a dead Christ also exist). Wiley and Abdi are totally different artists. The difference between him and Wiley is overt and I think the problem for people is learning to see the differences. That, to me, is a shame as it is those differences that are critical in art. I don’t believe one can claim a subject. It also wouldn’t surprise me if Abdi, a Christian, was unaware of Wiley’s work because so many dead Christs exist in art history/imagery.

  • http://www.milgo-bufkin.com/sculputurefabrication.html Steven Mesler

    What struck me most about the show was the generosity that existed between 4 of the 5 artists despite being in competition with each other. Jaclyn request to use creative material completed outside of the studio time was denied and that was perhaps a bit petty. Aside from that, I saw what I see in the art world in general, a “were all in this together” atmosphere, a free exchange of ideas and suggestions, and offers of assistance. That’s one of the things that sets the art world apart and that will serve the remaining artists well as they make their way.

    Finally, this show isn’t the silliest most absurd thing I’ve ever seen in the art world. Not by a long shot.

  • http://www.milgo-bufkin.com/sculputurefabrication.html Steven Mesler

    What struck me most about the show was the generosity that existed between 4 of the 5 artists despite being in competition with each other. Jaclyn request to use creative material completed outside of the studio time was denied and that was perhaps a bit petty. Aside from that, I saw what I see in the art world in general, a “were all in this together” atmosphere, a free exchange of ideas and suggestions, and offers of assistance. That’s one of the things that sets the art world apart and that will serve the remaining artists well as they make their way.

    Finally, this show isn’t the silliest most absurd thing I’ve ever seen in the art world. Not by a long shot.

  • http://www.milgo-bufkin.com/sculputurefabrication.html Steven Mesler

    What struck me most about the show was the generosity that existed between 4 of the 5 artists despite being in competition with each other. Jaclyn request to use creative material completed outside of the studio time was denied and that was perhaps a bit petty. Aside from that, I saw what I see in the art world in general, a “were all in this together” atmosphere, a free exchange of ideas and suggestions, and offers of assistance. That’s one of the things that sets the art world apart and that will serve the remaining artists well as they make their way.

    Finally, this show isn’t the silliest most absurd thing I’ve ever seen in the art world. Not by a long shot.

  • http://www.milgo-bufkin.com/sculputurefabrication.html Steven Mesler

    What struck me most about the show was the generosity that existed between 4 of the 5 artists despite being in competition with each other. Jaclyn request to use creative material completed outside of the studio time was denied and that was perhaps a bit petty. Aside from that, I saw what I see in the art world in general, a “were all in this together” atmosphere, a free exchange of ideas and suggestions, and offers of assistance. That’s one of the things that sets the art world apart and that will serve the remaining artists well as they make their way.

    Finally, this show isn’t the silliest most absurd thing I’ve ever seen in the art world. Not by a long shot.

  • atonaladam

    AFC,

    Please clarify a few things so I can get a fuller understanding of your perspective:

    -While I understand and agree with you on Miles’ work, do you enjoy it visually? Or is it the process?
    - I am not a fan of Doner, but why did you term it cliché? I can take a guess, but don’t want to assume anything…
    -In this context, how do you define ‘academic’?

    For me, Nicole’s final product was no better or worse than Miles’. I immediately thought, center of the earth or solar system. With Mile’s work I got bleach drips and the instruments he used; and a mushroom/ ‘drawing’? on a wall/mantel and mat. I thought bleach eating away on paper and not sure what else.

    With neither artist could I really tap into their back-story/intent.

    Thanks,
    A

    • artfagcity

      Actually, it’s probably presentation more than process (though that’s what I highlighted). The frame he made matched the shelf and the stretcher. It looked very clean and like it belonged in a gallery. Miles really understands the language of fine art, which is something I question about all the other remaining contestants (even Peregrine, though to a lesser degree). As far as the work itself, the black and white study didn’t illuminate anything about fungus, and ultimately he just made a really big study of what bleach does to craft paper. It wasn’t very good and the process was meaningless.

      Academic: Realistic life drawings of the figure. I’ve used the term derisively, arguably unfairly (I know this was not a life drawing, but in this case close enough), but it’s not like Fischbach gallery is making real inroads in the contemporary art scene, which is the best home this art could find. I don’t know what Doner is, but I assume you’re talking about Abdi. I found the techniques very cheesy. The wash as water in particular is a problem.

      Nicole’s work did seem model like to me, so I really disliked it for that. I looked at both and I thought: Which would look better in a gallery? Miles took that prize without question. Nicole’s work seemed better suited to Eleven Rivington, a gallery that manages to consistently show undeveloped art.

      • BethW

        I think atonaladom was asking about your statement that Doner, the guest artist has a career marred by cliched work. (Her name was unfamiliar, so I went to her website. There’s a quality of artsy/crafty to some of her work that doesn’t seem to add anything new to the folk art that it borrows from, other than slickness and expensive casting processes.)
        Citing the specific galleries that an artist like Abdi or an artist like Nicole might connect with is a great idea. It lets readers compare each of the artist’s individual approaches and concerns, along with the relative mastery of their craft, with those of their potential peers- i.e. the artists those galleries already represent. You’re spot on with your picks.

        • artfagcity

          Oooh, for some reason I didn’t recognize Donor without the Oka. Anyway, her work was new to me too, which didn’t strike me as a good thing. She’s basically an almalgum of Kiki Smith and Anslem Keifer without any of the darkness that can make both artists work compelling. Oka Donor’s work doesn’t say anything about nature accept that the figure is part of it. We already knew that. It’s the worst of matchy-matchy concept art: Nature and humans are one = figure made of tree branches. Furniture and nature connect = coffee table made of tree branches. Table with holes casts a shadow that is the solar system. Give me a break. Her work gives me the feeling Oka Donor hasn’t been to a contemporary art gallery in years.

          • artfagcity

            I think I’m getting tired of writing these round-ups. A lot of what I’m writing here should have been made clear within the post itself. Sorry about that.

          • atonaladam

            Thanks AFC,

            I appreciate your blog and your time in answering the questions posed. It gives me more clarity on your perspective.

            Thanks again,
            A

  • atonaladam

    AFC,

    Please clarify a few things so I can get a fuller understanding of your perspective:

    -While I understand and agree with you on Miles’ work, do you enjoy it visually? Or is it the process?
    - I am not a fan of Doner, but why did you term it cliché? I can take a guess, but don’t want to assume anything…
    -In this context, how do you define ‘academic’?

    For me, Nicole’s final product was no better or worse than Miles’. I immediately thought, center of the earth or solar system. With Mile’s work I got bleach drips and the instruments he used; and a mushroom/ ‘drawing’? on a wall/mantel and mat. I thought bleach eating away on paper and not sure what else.

    With neither artist could I really tap into their back-story/intent.

    Thanks,
    A

  • atonaladam

    AFC,

    Please clarify a few things so I can get a fuller understanding of your perspective:

    -While I understand and agree with you on Miles’ work, do you enjoy it visually? Or is it the process?
    - I am not a fan of Doner, but why did you term it cliché? I can take a guess, but don’t want to assume anything…
    -In this context, how do you define ‘academic’?

    For me, Nicole’s final product was no better or worse than Miles’. I immediately thought, center of the earth or solar system. With Mile’s work I got bleach drips and the instruments he used; and a mushroom/ ‘drawing’? on a wall/mantel and mat. I thought bleach eating away on paper and not sure what else.

    With neither artist could I really tap into their back-story/intent.

    Thanks,
    A

  • atonaladam

    AFC,

    Please clarify a few things so I can get a fuller understanding of your perspective:

    -While I understand and agree with you on Miles’ work, do you enjoy it visually? Or is it the process?
    - I am not a fan of Doner, but why did you term it cliché? I can take a guess, but don’t want to assume anything…
    -In this context, how do you define ‘academic’?

    For me, Nicole’s final product was no better or worse than Miles’. I immediately thought, center of the earth or solar system. With Mile’s work I got bleach drips and the instruments he used; and a mushroom/ ‘drawing’? on a wall/mantel and mat. I thought bleach eating away on paper and not sure what else.

    With neither artist could I really tap into their back-story/intent.

    Thanks,
    A

  • atonaladam

    AFC,

    Please clarify a few things so I can get a fuller understanding of your perspective:

    -While I understand and agree with you on Miles’ work, do you enjoy it visually? Or is it the process?
    - I am not a fan of Doner, but why did you term it cliché? I can take a guess, but don’t want to assume anything…
    -In this context, how do you define ‘academic’?

    For me, Nicole’s final product was no better or worse than Miles’. I immediately thought, center of the earth or solar system. With Mile’s work I got bleach drips and the instruments he used; and a mushroom/ ‘drawing’? on a wall/mantel and mat. I thought bleach eating away on paper and not sure what else.

    With neither artist could I really tap into their back-story/intent.

    Thanks,
    A

    • artfagcity

      Actually, it’s probably presentation more than process (though that’s what I highlighted). The frame he made matched the shelf and the stretcher. It looked very clean and like it belonged in a gallery. Miles really understands the language of fine art, which is something I question about all the other remaining contestants (even Peregrine, though to a lesser degree). As far as the work itself, the black and white study didn’t illuminate anything about fungus, and ultimately he just made a really big study of what bleach does to craft paper. It wasn’t very good and the process was meaningless.

      Academic: Realistic life drawings of the figure. I’ve used the term derisively, arguably unfairly (I know this was not a life drawing, but in this case close enough), but it’s not like Fischbach gallery is making real inroads in the contemporary art scene, which is the best home this art could find. I don’t know what Doner is, but I assume you’re talking about Abdi. I found the techniques very cheesy. The wash as water in particular is a problem.

      Nicole’s work did seem model like to me, so I really disliked it for that. I looked at both and I thought: Which would look better in a gallery? Miles took that prize without question. Nicole’s work seemed better suited to Eleven Rivington, a gallery that manages to consistently show undeveloped art.

      • BethW

        I think atonaladom was asking about your statement that Doner, the guest artist has a career marred by cliched work. (Her name was unfamiliar, so I went to her website. There’s a quality of artsy/crafty to some of her work that doesn’t seem to add anything new to the folk art that it borrows from, other than slickness and expensive casting processes.)
        Citing the specific galleries that an artist like Abdi or an artist like Nicole might connect with is a great idea. It lets readers compare each of the artist’s individual approaches and concerns, along with the relative mastery of their craft, with those of their potential peers- i.e. the artists those galleries already represent. You’re spot on with your picks.

        • artfagcity

          Oooh, for some reason I didn’t recognize Donor without the Oka. Anyway, her work was new to me too, which didn’t strike me as a good thing. She’s basically an almalgum of Kiki Smith and Anslem Keifer without any of the darkness that can make both artists work compelling. Oka Donor’s work doesn’t say anything about nature accept that the figure is part of it. We already knew that. It’s the worst of matchy-matchy concept art: Nature and humans are one = figure made of tree branches. Furniture and nature connect = coffee table made of tree branches. Table with holes casts a shadow that is the solar system. Give me a break. Her work gives me the feeling Oka Donor hasn’t been to a contemporary art gallery in years.

          • artfagcity

            I think I’m getting tired of writing these round-ups. A lot of what I’m writing here should have been made clear within the post itself. Sorry about that.

          • atonaladam

            Thanks AFC,

            I appreciate your blog and your time in answering the questions posed. It gives me more clarity on your perspective.

            Thanks again,
            A

  • http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/ L.M.

    Actually the resemblance from both is to Holbein’s magnificent Dead Christ. (a lot of people caught that similarity, but not the expert judging panel)

  • http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/ L.M.

    Actually the resemblance from both is to Holbein’s magnificent Dead Christ. (a lot of people caught that similarity, but not the expert judging panel)

    • http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/ L.M.

      Looks like atonaladam and I commented on Holbein at the same time. Didn’t mean to be redundant.

    • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

      There’s definitely a similar composition, especially the coincidence of the jutting goatees (though I like that Holbein’s Christ is flipping the bird). Still, it’s pretty much guaranteed that *any* image of a supine man (especially if they’re young, and only wearing underwear/a loincloth) could be compared to Jesus imagery — especially if you throw in a religiously-charged title like “Baptism.” It’s like how a still-shot of the winning crane-kick from “The Karate Kid” could be compared to the crucifixion, or how any image of a man being carried or brought down from a height can be compared to “The Pietà” or the deposition.

    • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

      There’s definitely a similar composition, especially the coincidence of the jutting goatees (though I like that Holbein’s Christ is flipping the bird). Still, it’s pretty much guaranteed that *any* image of a supine man (especially if they’re young, and only wearing underwear/a loincloth) could be compared to Jesus imagery — especially if you throw in a religiously-charged title like “Baptism.” It’s like how a still-shot of the winning crane-kick from “The Karate Kid” could be compared to the crucifixion, or how any image of a man being carried or brought down from a height can be compared to “The Pietà” or the deposition.

    • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

      There’s definitely a similar composition, especially the coincidence of the jutting goatees (though I like that Holbein’s Christ is flipping the bird). Still, it’s pretty much guaranteed that *any* image of a supine man (especially if they’re young, and only wearing underwear/a loincloth) could be compared to Jesus imagery — especially if you throw in a religiously-charged title like “Baptism.” It’s like how a still-shot of the winning crane-kick from “The Karate Kid” could be compared to the crucifixion, or how any image of a man being carried or brought down from a height can be compared to “The Pietà” or the deposition.

    • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

      There’s definitely a similar composition, especially the coincidence of the jutting goatees (though I like that Holbein’s Christ is flipping the bird). Still, it’s pretty much guaranteed that *any* image of a supine man (especially if they’re young, and only wearing underwear/a loincloth) could be compared to Jesus imagery — especially if you throw in a religiously-charged title like “Baptism.” It’s like how a still-shot of the winning crane-kick from “The Karate Kid” could be compared to the crucifixion, or how any image of a man being carried or brought down from a height can be compared to “The Pietà” or the deposition.

      • http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/ L.M.

        And pointing out those references makes for interesting observations, it’s not necessarily meant as criticism. Every artist is on the receiving end of that at one point or another. Whether the reference was conscious or not, there is a some pleasure in thinking that you are a tiny part of a continuum, (no matter how misguided).

        • Jeff Evans

          Isaac Newton said “If I have seen further it is only by standing on the shoulders of giants.” I’m sure artists would say the same about their predecessors.

  • http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/ L.M.

    Actually the resemblance from both is to Holbein’s magnificent Dead Christ. (a lot of people caught that similarity, but not the expert judging panel)

  • http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/ L.M.

    Actually the resemblance from both is to Holbein’s magnificent Dead Christ. (a lot of people caught that similarity, but not the expert judging panel)

    • http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/ L.M.

      Looks like atonaladam and I commented on Holbein at the same time. Didn’t mean to be redundant.

    • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

      There’s definitely a similar composition, especially the coincidence of the jutting goatees (though I like that Holbein’s Christ is flipping the bird). Still, it’s pretty much guaranteed that *any* image of a supine man (especially if they’re young, and only wearing underwear/a loincloth) could be compared to Jesus imagery — especially if you throw in a religiously-charged title like “Baptism.” It’s like how a still-shot of the winning crane-kick from “The Karate Kid” could be compared to the crucifixion, or how any image of a man being carried or brought down from a height can be compared to “The Pietà” or the deposition.

      • http://www.digitalmediatree.com/sallymckay/ L.M.

        And pointing out those references makes for interesting observations, it’s not necessarily meant as criticism. Every artist is on the receiving end of that at one point or another. Whether the reference was conscious or not, there is a some pleasure in thinking that you are a tiny part of a continuum, (no matter how misguided).

        • Jeff Evans

          Isaac Newton said “If I have seen further it is only by standing on the shoulders of giants.” I’m sure artists would say the same about their predecessors.

  • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

    That photo of Miles works frighteningly well with that Hasselhoff-infinity-crotch GIF you posted the other day: http://bit.ly/bkSqlY

    It also reminds me of a lot of Hockney’s earlier paintings, like this: http://bit.ly/bq1SIv

    And Nicole’s piece is shockingly similar to this: http://bit.ly/bkD2L5

    • http://www.skipvancel.com Andy Whore Wall

      That photo with the Hasselhoff-infinity-crotch is so gay! I love it!

  • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

    That photo of Miles works frighteningly well with that Hasselhoff-infinity-crotch GIF you posted the other day: http://bit.ly/bkSqlY

    It also reminds me of a lot of Hockney’s earlier paintings, like this: http://bit.ly/bq1SIv

    And Nicole’s piece is shockingly similar to this: http://bit.ly/bkD2L5

  • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

    That photo of Miles works frighteningly well with that Hasselhoff-infinity-crotch GIF you posted the other day: http://bit.ly/bkSqlY

    It also reminds me of a lot of Hockney’s earlier paintings, like this: http://bit.ly/bq1SIv

    And Nicole’s piece is shockingly similar to this: http://bit.ly/bkD2L5

    • http://www.skipvancel.com Andy Whore Wall

      That photo with the Hasselhoff-infinity-crotch is so gay! I love it!

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

    Yeah lots of people are talking about the Wiley connection, I see that now that I skimmed the Saltz recap comments. And I agree all art is connections and references, and it’s what the new work brings to the table that we care about (or not). I will note to ATONALADAM that I do know that Abdi is versed in Wiley’s work, and that he is not a fan, because we had a pretty lengthy conversation about it early on when I was there. Abdi thinks (if I can paraphrase) that Wiley can’t really paint well, and is sorry that many in the black community consider him so highly. I hope I’m not mis-stating Abdi here by too much.

    My bringing up the connection is because I would very much like to hear the artist state those things as part of their thought process and inspiration. Or in this case Abdi could help us differentiate between his vision/goals and Wiley’s.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

    Yeah lots of people are talking about the Wiley connection, I see that now that I skimmed the Saltz recap comments. And I agree all art is connections and references, and it’s what the new work brings to the table that we care about (or not). I will note to ATONALADAM that I do know that Abdi is versed in Wiley’s work, and that he is not a fan, because we had a pretty lengthy conversation about it early on when I was there. Abdi thinks (if I can paraphrase) that Wiley can’t really paint well, and is sorry that many in the black community consider him so highly. I hope I’m not mis-stating Abdi here by too much.

    My bringing up the connection is because I would very much like to hear the artist state those things as part of their thought process and inspiration. Or in this case Abdi could help us differentiate between his vision/goals and Wiley’s.

    • Molly

      This interests me. I read an interview with Wiley yesterday, and he projects all his images and has his assistants – if I understand correctly – do the underdrawing and painting. I don’t think this is an invalid way of working, but I’ve noticed Abdi (at least as portrayed on the show) never uses mechanical means to transfer his images to canvas. I wonder if this has something to do with his opinion of Wiley?

      • atonaladam

        I also don’t find projection invalid (there are good and bad ways of doing this approach). It’s his painting I cannot enjoy, the image is valid. I prefer his work in reproduction/online. I don’t even know if Wiley calls himself a painter.

        Norman Rockwell is criticized for this as well. He created work to look good in reproduction/illustration. Fewer of Rockwell’s works, that I have seen, are painterly/not stiff. I am defining painterliness before pre- Courbet/Manet too (a longer dialogue)…

        What I find interesting is how both are working in what is often considered illustrative (stiff intentionally for reproduction/ not always true).

        Image-wise, I’ve seen commercial/illustration work today (and historically) that is more impressive than Wiley and Abdi- but for different reasons: Wiley for the handling of materials and Abdi, from what I’ve seen on TV, for his lack of imagination/depth.

        A

    • Molly

      This interests me. I read an interview with Wiley yesterday, and he projects all his images and has his assistants – if I understand correctly – do the underdrawing and painting. I don’t think this is an invalid way of working, but I’ve noticed Abdi (at least as portrayed on the show) never uses mechanical means to transfer his images to canvas. I wonder if this has something to do with his opinion of Wiley?

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

    Yeah lots of people are talking about the Wiley connection, I see that now that I skimmed the Saltz recap comments. And I agree all art is connections and references, and it’s what the new work brings to the table that we care about (or not). I will note to ATONALADAM that I do know that Abdi is versed in Wiley’s work, and that he is not a fan, because we had a pretty lengthy conversation about it early on when I was there. Abdi thinks (if I can paraphrase) that Wiley can’t really paint well, and is sorry that many in the black community consider him so highly. I hope I’m not mis-stating Abdi here by too much.

    My bringing up the connection is because I would very much like to hear the artist state those things as part of their thought process and inspiration. Or in this case Abdi could help us differentiate between his vision/goals and Wiley’s.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

    Yeah lots of people are talking about the Wiley connection, I see that now that I skimmed the Saltz recap comments. And I agree all art is connections and references, and it’s what the new work brings to the table that we care about (or not). I will note to ATONALADAM that I do know that Abdi is versed in Wiley’s work, and that he is not a fan, because we had a pretty lengthy conversation about it early on when I was there. Abdi thinks (if I can paraphrase) that Wiley can’t really paint well, and is sorry that many in the black community consider him so highly. I hope I’m not mis-stating Abdi here by too much.

    My bringing up the connection is because I would very much like to hear the artist state those things as part of their thought process and inspiration. Or in this case Abdi could help us differentiate between his vision/goals and Wiley’s.

    • Molly

      This interests me. I read an interview with Wiley yesterday, and he projects all his images and has his assistants – if I understand correctly – do the underdrawing and painting. I don’t think this is an invalid way of working, but I’ve noticed Abdi (at least as portrayed on the show) never uses mechanical means to transfer his images to canvas. I wonder if this has something to do with his opinion of Wiley?

      • atonaladam

        I also don’t find projection invalid (there are good and bad ways of doing this approach). It’s his painting I cannot enjoy, the image is valid. I prefer his work in reproduction/online. I don’t even know if Wiley calls himself a painter.

        Norman Rockwell is criticized for this as well. He created work to look good in reproduction/illustration. Fewer of Rockwell’s works, that I have seen, are painterly/not stiff. I am defining painterliness before pre- Courbet/Manet too (a longer dialogue)…

        What I find interesting is how both are working in what is often considered illustrative (stiff intentionally for reproduction/ not always true).

        Image-wise, I’ve seen commercial/illustration work today (and historically) that is more impressive than Wiley and Abdi- but for different reasons: Wiley for the handling of materials and Abdi, from what I’ve seen on TV, for his lack of imagination/depth.

        A

  • Molly

    These reviews always make me feel like a total idiot. Miles’ piece looked like a piss stained sheet and did nothing for me, intellectually or emotionally. Abdi’s piece looked like it had an amazing surface and the drawing was impeccable. Is it “cliche” because it’s conventionally attractive?

    • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

      Miles’ work is manicured vagueness (like “mannered bereft,” but more reality-television friendly): it’s essentially corporate window-dressing, but with an air of indeterminate affectation that will give Saltz a chubby and qualify it as sophisticated, complex, and meaningful art.

      Miles’ work is absolutely perfect for WANGA: it employs the familiar tropes of advertising, but without selling us anything — it’s all desire. Miles has taken the mannerisms of an already empty form — advertising — and drained them even further, leaving us with anemic, pseudo-ponderous husks. So your feeling “intellectually (and) emotionally” numb about Miles’ piece(s) is appropriate, but now you’ve got to distort and pervert those accurate impressions into hand-on-chin explanations of how great the works are because of their knowing restraint and ironic cool.

      Miles’ piece is like Kosuth’s “One and Three Chairs” (but minus the semiotics and shit): http://bit.ly/bnUtOA

      Abdi just made a nice self-portrait. Meh. Now, if he *had* pissed on it, that would’ve been excellent (and it would’ve made up for his previous ignorance of “Piss Christ”).

      • Jim C.

        I don’t know Miles’s work outside this show, but calling Miles’s WANGA stuff “corporate window dressing” is a little too dismissive. Whereas anyone could understand being left cold by the works, I think the thought and method behind them is as solid as any other contestant’s.

        Miles may not be the ideal artist, but he is the ideal WANGA contestant. He shows future contestants what it takes to win this type of artifical, time-dependent, kitchen-sink competition: some familiarity with contemporary art, and impressive facility with a variety of materials. You have to be able to conceive and execute in a way shorter time than you would doing your own work, and Sleepydouche Cuteypie really did this better than anyone.

        Mind you, Miles may not win, in keeping with reality TV’s “last minute shocker” trend–but he certainly deserves to.

    • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

      Miles’ work is manicured vagueness (like “mannered bereft,” but more reality-television friendly): it’s essentially corporate window-dressing, but with an air of indeterminate affectation that will give Saltz a chubby and qualify it as sophisticated, complex, and meaningful art.

      Miles’ work is absolutely perfect for WANGA: it employs the familiar tropes of advertising, but without selling us anything — it’s all desire. Miles has taken the mannerisms of an already empty form — advertising — and drained them even further, leaving us with anemic, pseudo-ponderous husks. So your feeling “intellectually (and) emotionally” numb about Miles’ piece(s) is appropriate, but now you’ve got to distort and pervert those accurate impressions into hand-on-chin explanations of how great the works are because of their knowing restraint and ironic cool.

      Miles’ piece is like Kosuth’s “One and Three Chairs” (but minus the semiotics and shit): http://bit.ly/bnUtOA

      Abdi just made a nice self-portrait. Meh. Now, if he *had* pissed on it, that would’ve been excellent (and it would’ve made up for his previous ignorance of “Piss Christ”).

    • artfagcity

      I didn’t like Miles’ piece, I just liked it better than everything else. He tries to push materials and I think he does a pretty good job of it even if it fails.

      The cliche parts of Abdi’s work:

      The “water” treatment with the charcoal. I’ve seen that a million times and it smacks of undergrad.

      The line drawing on top of charcoal rendering. Sometimes this can be effective, but you have to have the skills of Goya to pull it off. Abdi is not of this level.

      Mind you I haven’t seen the work in person – but from the close ups they showed on the TV I wasn’t convinced.

      • Molly

        Thank you Paddy, this was very helpful.

  • Molly

    These reviews always make me feel like a total idiot. Miles’ piece looked like a piss stained sheet and did nothing for me, intellectually or emotionally. Abdi’s piece looked like it had an amazing surface and the drawing was impeccable. Is it “cliche” because it’s conventionally attractive?

  • Molly

    These reviews always make me feel like a total idiot. Miles’ piece looked like a piss stained sheet and did nothing for me, intellectually or emotionally. Abdi’s piece looked like it had an amazing surface and the drawing was impeccable. Is it “cliche” because it’s conventionally attractive?

  • Molly

    These reviews always make me feel like a total idiot. Miles’ piece looked like a piss stained sheet and did nothing for me, intellectually or emotionally. Abdi’s piece looked like it had an amazing surface and the drawing was impeccable. Is it “cliche” because it’s conventionally attractive?

  • Molly

    These reviews always make me feel like a total idiot. Miles’ piece looked like a piss stained sheet and did nothing for me, intellectually or emotionally. Abdi’s piece looked like it had an amazing surface and the drawing was impeccable. Is it “cliche” because it’s conventionally attractive?

    • http://jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com/ Jesse P. Martin

      Miles’ work is manicured vagueness (like “mannered bereft,” but more reality-television friendly): it’s essentially corporate window-dressing, but with an air of indeterminate affectation that will give Saltz a chubby and qualify it as sophisticated, complex, and meaningful art.

      Miles’ work is absolutely perfect for WANGA: it employs the familiar tropes of advertising, but without selling us anything — it’s all desire. Miles has taken the mannerisms of an already empty form — advertising — and drained them even further, leaving us with anemic, pseudo-ponderous husks. So your feeling “intellectually (and) emotionally” numb about Miles’ piece(s) is appropriate, but now you’ve got to distort and pervert those accurate impressions into hand-on-chin explanations of how great the works are because of their knowing restraint and ironic cool.

      Miles’ piece is like Kosuth’s “One and Three Chairs” (but minus the semiotics and shit): http://bit.ly/bnUtOA

      Abdi just made a nice self-portrait. Meh. Now, if he *had* pissed on it, that would’ve been excellent (and it would’ve made up for his previous ignorance of “Piss Christ”).

      • Jim C.

        I don’t know Miles’s work outside this show, but calling Miles’s WANGA stuff “corporate window dressing” is a little too dismissive. Whereas anyone could understand being left cold by the works, I think the thought and method behind them is as solid as any other contestant’s.

        Miles may not be the ideal artist, but he is the ideal WANGA contestant. He shows future contestants what it takes to win this type of artifical, time-dependent, kitchen-sink competition: some familiarity with contemporary art, and impressive facility with a variety of materials. You have to be able to conceive and execute in a way shorter time than you would doing your own work, and Sleepydouche Cuteypie really did this better than anyone.

        Mind you, Miles may not win, in keeping with reality TV’s “last minute shocker” trend–but he certainly deserves to.

    • artfagcity

      I didn’t like Miles’ piece, I just liked it better than everything else. He tries to push materials and I think he does a pretty good job of it even if it fails.

      The cliche parts of Abdi’s work:

      The “water” treatment with the charcoal. I’ve seen that a million times and it smacks of undergrad.

      The line drawing on top of charcoal rendering. Sometimes this can be effective, but you have to have the skills of Goya to pull it off. Abdi is not of this level.

      Mind you I haven’t seen the work in person – but from the close ups they showed on the TV I wasn’t convinced.

      • Molly

        Thank you Paddy, this was very helpful.

  • atonaladam

    @Judith Braun

    Abdi, it seems, has a more painterly hand than Wiley (having seen details online/ I’ve never seen Abdi’s work up close.)

    When looking at Wiley’s work in the flesh, it lacks bravura/wet in wet work. It looks stiff/stale. Abdi, in my opinion, is correct on Wiley not being a good painter. Wiley is great at producing images, but does not play with paint like Manet, or so many other favorites of mine.

    Wiley’s work looks great on a Jpeg/reproduction. Wiley is a good image maker but not a great painter in my opinion as well. I too wish people would notice this.

    I am not a fan of Abdi on the show; for me, he lacks sophistication/depth.

    A

    • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

      I agree with you on Wiley’s paint handling itself, not exciting, but that his images are. I suppose this is part of what bothers Abdi, although I personally didn’t see a more interesting paint handling from him. He’s more expressionistic, but it fell into a cliche look… for my eye. So my argument for Wiley is that his images and vision exist now in the world, and I am glad they do. I want to see what he’s painting a few years from now…and I wonder what Abdi will do too!

      The earlier sculpture of Abdi’s, the figure with the TV head, had a hint of something I liked…and that was the socks on the feet. It seemed like a moment that was not devoted to (yet still informed by) this whole celebration of the human figure…which I do really think is a dead end for him.

      • atonaladam

        I find the T.V. set/ body sculpture cliche. To me, I’ve seen it many times in commercial/ illustration work and in clothing store window displays. I’m really surprised the judges didn’t call him on it (all Abdi had to do was add a pair of antlers.)

  • atonaladam

    @Judith Braun

    Abdi, it seems, has a more painterly hand than Wiley (having seen details online/ I’ve never seen Abdi’s work up close.)

    When looking at Wiley’s work in the flesh, it lacks bravura/wet in wet work. It looks stiff/stale. Abdi, in my opinion, is correct on Wiley not being a good painter. Wiley is great at producing images, but does not play with paint like Manet, or so many other favorites of mine.

    Wiley’s work looks great on a Jpeg/reproduction. Wiley is a good image maker but not a great painter in my opinion as well. I too wish people would notice this.

    I am not a fan of Abdi on the show; for me, he lacks sophistication/depth.

    A

  • atonaladam

    @Judith Braun

    Abdi, it seems, has a more painterly hand than Wiley (having seen details online/ I’ve never seen Abdi’s work up close.)

    When looking at Wiley’s work in the flesh, it lacks bravura/wet in wet work. It looks stiff/stale. Abdi, in my opinion, is correct on Wiley not being a good painter. Wiley is great at producing images, but does not play with paint like Manet, or so many other favorites of mine.

    Wiley’s work looks great on a Jpeg/reproduction. Wiley is a good image maker but not a great painter in my opinion as well. I too wish people would notice this.

    I am not a fan of Abdi on the show; for me, he lacks sophistication/depth.

    A

  • atonaladam

    @Judith Braun

    Abdi, it seems, has a more painterly hand than Wiley (having seen details online/ I’ve never seen Abdi’s work up close.)

    When looking at Wiley’s work in the flesh, it lacks bravura/wet in wet work. It looks stiff/stale. Abdi, in my opinion, is correct on Wiley not being a good painter. Wiley is great at producing images, but does not play with paint like Manet, or so many other favorites of mine.

    Wiley’s work looks great on a Jpeg/reproduction. Wiley is a good image maker but not a great painter in my opinion as well. I too wish people would notice this.

    I am not a fan of Abdi on the show; for me, he lacks sophistication/depth.

    A

    • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

      I agree with you on Wiley’s paint handling itself, not exciting, but that his images are. I suppose this is part of what bothers Abdi, although I personally didn’t see a more interesting paint handling from him. He’s more expressionistic, but it fell into a cliche look… for my eye. So my argument for Wiley is that his images and vision exist now in the world, and I am glad they do. I want to see what he’s painting a few years from now…and I wonder what Abdi will do too!

      The earlier sculpture of Abdi’s, the figure with the TV head, had a hint of something I liked…and that was the socks on the feet. It seemed like a moment that was not devoted to (yet still informed by) this whole celebration of the human figure…which I do really think is a dead end for him.

      • atonaladam

        I find the T.V. set/ body sculpture cliche. To me, I’ve seen it many times in commercial/ illustration work and in clothing store window displays. I’m really surprised the judges didn’t call him on it (all Abdi had to do was add a pair of antlers.)

  • sallan

    I think Abdi made it into the finals instead of Nicole because he hit it out of the park on this last challenge. If some else had won, then Abdi would not be there. Based on consistency throughout the competition, I would have said Miles, Nicole and Peregrine. I’m bummed to see Nicole go (I think I’m about the only one who liked her piece), but at the same time I have to say I was sucked into the drama enough (even though I know better, or think I should) to be happy for Abdi. To me, Miles’s piece looked too cluttered – the medieval torture device seemed so out of place. I can’t wait to see the pieces each of the finalists made for the last show. Without the time constraints and arbitrary rules, I think we will finally see what they can really accomplish.

  • sallan

    I think Abdi made it into the finals instead of Nicole because he hit it out of the park on this last challenge. If some else had won, then Abdi would not be there. Based on consistency throughout the competition, I would have said Miles, Nicole and Peregrine. I’m bummed to see Nicole go (I think I’m about the only one who liked her piece), but at the same time I have to say I was sucked into the drama enough (even though I know better, or think I should) to be happy for Abdi. To me, Miles’s piece looked too cluttered – the medieval torture device seemed so out of place. I can’t wait to see the pieces each of the finalists made for the last show. Without the time constraints and arbitrary rules, I think we will finally see what they can really accomplish.

  • Hwg

    I have not seen any posts about Jacyln’s paintings, regarding an inconsistency i’ve noticed. Her masterbation “painting” last week looked like a photo with some palette knife painting added. On her website, the new painting based on her forbidden bathtub shot looks nothing like her other paintings in the way the paint is handled. it looks more like the masterbation piece. I wounder if it is actually mixed media, rather than a straight up oil painting, as it is labelled. Anyone see this?

    • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

      @Hwg: Yes, I noticed the same thing. Though besides the first “self portrait” which I saw in person, I saw the others either on tv, or online. I was going to go see her recent solo show last week, but then found out it had just been up for one night, so I missed it.

      • http://www.roygreenart.blogspot.com royston

        the nude self-portrait is the biggest art-school cliche of them all..disguised by the trendy rubric of “identity” …miles is a smarty-pants quasi-minimalist who will probably do quite well for himself showing in non-commercial artist-run centers in medium sized cities…peregrine should really go for it and eschew the cutesy from her work and confront her weird sexual upbringing/commune childhood with gutsy humour and technical finesse…she’s about the only one i would have coffee with..

    • sarcasatire

      I actually was considering ‘Liking’ Jaclyn’s friend page so that I could ask her about this. I just don’t see how she can create realism paintings on the level of, say, Ryan, and find it highly suspicious when she prints out photos to the exact size of her finished oil canvases. Methinks she’s just added a few brushstrokes on top of her photographed image.

      Especially the pic of her getting out of the car with the star-twat. The close up looks alot like a photo.

  • Hwg

    I have not seen any posts about Jacyln’s paintings, regarding an inconsistency i’ve noticed. Her masterbation “painting” last week looked like a photo with some palette knife painting added. On her website, the new painting based on her forbidden bathtub shot looks nothing like her other paintings in the way the paint is handled. it looks more like the masterbation piece. I wounder if it is actually mixed media, rather than a straight up oil painting, as it is labelled. Anyone see this?

    • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

      @Hwg: Yes, I noticed the same thing. Though besides the first “self portrait” which I saw in person, I saw the others either on tv, or online. I was going to go see her recent solo show last week, but then found out it had just been up for one night, so I missed it.

      • http://www.roygreenart.blogspot.com royston

        the nude self-portrait is the biggest art-school cliche of them all..disguised by the trendy rubric of “identity” …miles is a smarty-pants quasi-minimalist who will probably do quite well for himself showing in non-commercial artist-run centers in medium sized cities…peregrine should really go for it and eschew the cutesy from her work and confront her weird sexual upbringing/commune childhood with gutsy humour and technical finesse…she’s about the only one i would have coffee with..

    • sarcasatire

      I actually was considering ‘Liking’ Jaclyn’s friend page so that I could ask her about this. I just don’t see how she can create realism paintings on the level of, say, Ryan, and find it highly suspicious when she prints out photos to the exact size of her finished oil canvases. Methinks she’s just added a few brushstrokes on top of her photographed image.

      Especially the pic of her getting out of the car with the star-twat. The close up looks alot like a photo.

  • Joe H.

    Peregrine dresses ‘that way’ everyday here at home. She’s not costuming herself for the cameras nor the audience. The bunny ears are as standard as anybody’s socks, drawers, glasses.

    • artfagcity

      I still see it as an affectation. Just because she wears it all the time doesn’t mean that it’s not designed to illicit attention. It’s a fairly targeted type of attention, but one none the less.

  • Joe H.

    Peregrine dresses ‘that way’ everyday here at home. She’s not costuming herself for the cameras nor the audience. The bunny ears are as standard as anybody’s socks, drawers, glasses.

    • artfagcity

      I still see it as an affectation. Just because she wears it all the time doesn’t mean that it’s not designed to illicit attention. It’s a fairly targeted type of attention, but one none the less.

  • http://thedilettantista.wordpress.com thedilettantista

    Nothing here to add that no one else has already said, but I just want to express my continued amazement that this show has people–and seemingly lots of them the more I hunt around the web–talking and engaging and thinking about art. Say what you will about this series and the art (I am infuriated and fascinated and amazed as the rest of you) but it is so wonderful to me that there is this wide and public discourse happening.

    Hence, a positive, Bravo’s Work of Art has gotten the “public” interested in contemporary art. Huzzah.

    Thanks, AFC, I love reading your recap and Jerry Saltz’s recap back to back. Big fan of your blog too, finally decided to pipe up.

    • Not Ben

      yeah, I agree that the show has generated a lot of discourse and that’s good!

      The thing that interests me is that I could be one of the people who dismisses it and years from now people will talk about like they talk about Van Gogh today.

      I would love to think that I know what was good and what wasn’t during my time!!!

      • sarcasatire

        I know…I’m gonna be so sad when it’s over. Reality TV will once again be screeching housewives and drunk twentysomethings. Not much intellectual discourse can come from that. :/

    • http://www.jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com Jesse P. Martin

      I’m amazed with, excited about, and love how WANGA has really broadened what qualifies as “discourse,” “thinking,” “engaging,” “intellectual,” and “art.” It’s so reassuring!

  • http://thedilettantista.wordpress.com thedilettantista

    Nothing here to add that no one else has already said, but I just want to express my continued amazement that this show has people–and seemingly lots of them the more I hunt around the web–talking and engaging and thinking about art. Say what you will about this series and the art (I am infuriated and fascinated and amazed as the rest of you) but it is so wonderful to me that there is this wide and public discourse happening.

    Hence, a positive, Bravo’s Work of Art has gotten the “public” interested in contemporary art. Huzzah.

    Thanks, AFC, I love reading your recap and Jerry Saltz’s recap back to back. Big fan of your blog too, finally decided to pipe up.

    • Not Ben

      yeah, I agree that the show has generated a lot of discourse and that’s good!

      The thing that interests me is that I could be one of the people who dismisses it and years from now people will talk about like they talk about Van Gogh today.

      I would love to think that I know what was good and what wasn’t during my time!!!

      • sarcasatire

        I know…I’m gonna be so sad when it’s over. Reality TV will once again be screeching housewives and drunk twentysomethings. Not much intellectual discourse can come from that. :/

    • http://www.jessepatrickmartin.blogspot.com Jesse P. Martin

      I’m amazed with, excited about, and love how WANGA has really broadened what qualifies as “discourse,” “thinking,” “engaging,” “intellectual,” and “art.” It’s so reassuring!

  • Walter Latimer

    i’m not sure jaclyn’s piece showed as much imagination as it might let up. when i saw it i instantly remembered janine antoni’s tightrope video, also using that trick horizon. i thought that might have been just a coincidence until reading jaclyn’s blog where janine antoni is the first artist she lists as an inspiration. i’m not making any accusations but it’s a similarity i noticed and i find hard to believe she didn’t notice either…

    • artfagcity

      Borrowing from Antoni is fine in my books, mostly because she’s just making art school level work. That’s the case with most of them, which is why when you identify the reference, it basically hits you in the face.

  • Walter Latimer

    i’m not sure jaclyn’s piece showed as much imagination as it might let up. when i saw it i instantly remembered janine antoni’s tightrope video, also using that trick horizon. i thought that might have been just a coincidence until reading jaclyn’s blog where janine antoni is the first artist she lists as an inspiration. i’m not making any accusations but it’s a similarity i noticed and i find hard to believe she didn’t notice either…

    • artfagcity

      Borrowing from Antoni is fine in my books, mostly because she’s just making art school level work. That’s the case with most of them, which is why when you identify the reference, it basically hits you in the face.

  • http://boredintellect.blogspot.com Colin Roe Ledbetter

    miles fucking rocks.

    • Leroy

      now I’d watch that.

  • http://boredintellect.blogspot.com Colin Roe Ledbetter

    miles fucking rocks.

    • Leroy

      now I’d watch that.

  • Susan

    Initially, I was concerned for Miles’ piece. For me, it seemed like the *wow* of process took precedence over the meaning. (The process was cool.)

    But, thankfully the picture on this site does the editing that Miles could have done. Without that device, I saw the unity of the story & how it deconstructed the essence of the fungus into energy. I liked the inversion of negative and positive space between both pictures. It would have been fascinating to have brought some of the wood with the fungus. Emphasizing how the fungus derives it’s energy from a decaying piece of wood — life & death intertwined.

    The irony of Jackie’s pieces in the photo here — it almost looks like it was painted on wood! Now that could have been cooler than what she gave. Ultimately tho, it was just an awkward pastache of things.

  • Susan

    Initially, I was concerned for Miles’ piece. For me, it seemed like the *wow* of process took precedence over the meaning. (The process was cool.)

    But, thankfully the picture on this site does the editing that Miles could have done. Without that device, I saw the unity of the story & how it deconstructed the essence of the fungus into energy. I liked the inversion of negative and positive space between both pictures. It would have been fascinating to have brought some of the wood with the fungus. Emphasizing how the fungus derives it’s energy from a decaying piece of wood — life & death intertwined.

    The irony of Jackie’s pieces in the photo here — it almost looks like it was painted on wood! Now that could have been cooler than what she gave. Ultimately tho, it was just an awkward pastache of things.

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