Posts tagged as:

a.i.r. gallery

Avoiding Contemporary Politics At A.I.R. Gallery’s “Sinister Feminism”

by Emily Colucci on February 3, 2017
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One of the few positive side effects of Trump’s chaotic pussy-grabbing rise to power is the revitalization of feminism as an active political tool. Between the Women’s March and women-driven exhibitions like Nasty Women, women are now at the forefront of the resistance to Trump’s dangerous administration. The strength of this feminist revival explains why the failure of A.I.R. Gallery’s 12th biennial exhibition Sinister Feminism is such a disappointment.

Rather than a strong rebuke of a misogynist administration, Sinister Feminism, curated by Piper Marshall with Lola Kramer, shows a stubborn refusal to scrap wonky aesthetic concerns in a time of political emergency. Not only is the exhibition’s attempt to rethink feminist art’s essentialism hackneyed, it also felt disassociated from reality.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Constructing Paradise or the Devil Giving Birth to the Patriarchy?

by Michael Anthony Farley on January 30, 2017
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It’s a strange week in post-America, indeed, when the least dystopian art event involves Kim Kardashian ass-workout tapes.

That would be Cindy Hinant’s solo show at MuseumofAmericabooks Monday night. Tuesday, perpetual AFC fav Peter Burr is speaking at the New School, and never has the thought of retreating into one of his installations and imagining life in an underground city been so tempting. But if you’re an artist ready to join the resistance, head to ICP School on Wednesday for a discussion about the role of artists in activism during these dark days. Thursday, every opening feels timely, even Mary Beth Edelson’s 1970s feminist mythologies on view at David Lewis. Down the street, Bea Fremderman waxes apocalyptic at Shoot the Lobster, and the New School has an exhibition about the US/Mexican border that will probably break some hearts.

The weekend brings more timely events, such as David Diao exhibition about his childhood experiences as a refugee (at Postmasters) and a Sunday conference at the New Museum about bodies under duress. Come get advice from lawyers and activists about civil disobedience, the migrant crisis, environmental crises, and more.

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This Weeks Must-See Art Events: The Art World Mobilizes for 2017

by Paddy Johnson and Michael Anthony Farley on January 3, 2017
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For everyone who has complained that the art world is too apolitical in the past month or so, take note of how 2017 is kicking off. We have a week of feminist exhibitions, the start of a month-long project about Trump’s America Saturday at Petzel Gallery, and shows that tackle topics from water contamination to the holocaust and the attack on the Pulse nightclub in Orlando.

Welcome to the art world in the Trump era. If the list of participants at Petzel’s event is any indication, the big guns are coming out.

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Covering The Waterfront: The Dumbo Gallery Round-Up Part 2

by Emily Colucci on October 7, 2016
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Following the first part of my DUMBO gallery round-up, I concluded my waterfront adventure by visiting A.I.R. Gallery and Art In General. More on my trip below:

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This Week’s Must See Art Events: New York is Cheaper Than Venice

by Paddy Johnson and Michael Anthony Farley on May 4, 2015
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It may be Venice Biennale week over in Italy, but here in New York, there’s no shortage of things to do. Head to DUMBO for a screening of the cult horror classic Ganja & Hess, head to Williamsburg for a show of depressing paintings, and head to Bushwick for a show of artworks by 99 artists, each priced at $9.99. We’re super excited about that Bushwick show given this week’s activities—you can’t even get a stick of chewing gum for under 10 bucks in venice.

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Feminism Revisited: Regina Granne at A.I.R. Gallery

by Corinna Kirsch on April 14, 2015
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Walking into Regina Granne’s show at A.I.R. Gallery, ABOVE THE CLOUDS AND UNDER THE RADAR, might make you ask questions you hadn’t ever planned on asking, like: Who was Regina Granne, and why did she make paintings that look like I’m looking at the world through the eyes of a lopsided dog?

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Go Big or Go to the Beach

by Whitney Kimball on July 8, 2013
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Incoming! Prepare for the vomit wave of summer group shows. Due to the high volume of openings there, we’re sticking mostly to Chelsea this week.

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Eight Brooklyn Galleries Participate in the Exhibition Series Brooklyn / Montreal This January

by Paddy Johnson on December 27, 2012
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Add Brooklyn / Montreal to the list of exhibitions I’m looking forward to in the New Year. Join me Saturday, January 12 at A.I.R. Gallery for a discussion on cultural exchange.

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Concerns from The Second Economy: Daria Dorosh on the Baby Boomer’s Relationship to Technology and Art

by Paddy Johnson on November 14, 2011
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Perhaps due to my parents nearing retirement age, I’ve recently started wondering how the concerns of artists of that generation might differ from my own. How will artists care for their work as they age? Are their assets significantly different from younger generations? Can a strong knowledge of digital technology be helpful? I got in touch with seasoned activist and A.I.R. co-founder Daria Dorosh to discuss a few these concerns. We talk about her history at A.I.R., digital technology, and means of preserving art that does not make its way into a museum or a collector’s home.

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