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Alex Sewell

This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Reading is Fundamental

by Michael Anthony Farley on May 8, 2017
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Start your week off with a dose of Civil Rights history Monday at IFC, where fierce pussy is screening The Black Power Mixtape and Wednesday at ICP, where Hettie Jones will be talking about what Making America Great really looks like. Thursday, we’re looking forward to two book launches. Andrea McGinty will be releasing her Ah Yes Bad Things at Printed Matter and Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art is throwing a party to celebrate the catalog for their current exhibition Queer Threads. Friday night there are mysterious but promising exhibitions opening all over Brooklyn. Then it’s DUMBO open studios all weekend. End the week with a day trip to New Haven (seriously, it’s a painless train ride) where Bortolami’s ARTIST/CITY program has paired Tom Burr with a Marcel Breuer masterpiece that now finds itself surrounded by an IKEA parking lot.

The world is a strange and wondrous place. We’ll see you out in it.

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The Artist-Centric Movement has its Milestone Moment: SPRING/BREAK

by Paddy Johnson on March 7, 2016
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Walking around SPRING/BREAK this Saturday seemed indicative of a watershed moment. The artist-centric movement we’ve been tracking for the last several years is finally gaining more visibility and commercial success and no where is that more evident than this fair.

Located on the administrative floors at Moynihan Station (above the main post office), over 100 curated projects took over once occupied office space. These rooms were painted, wallpapered and filled with weird, temporary installations of fake apartments, medical institutions and cut out gardens. They also included paintings, collages and any other medium you can think of. Meanwhile, lines of fair goers wrapped around the building waiting to get in—even from the outside the excitement was palpable.

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