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Brian Kuan Wood

An Interview with Art Handler Magazine Founder Clynton Lowry: Looking at Labor, Trade and Kickstarter

by Paddy Johnson on September 24, 2015
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The first issue of Art Handler Magazine looks different than any trade magazine I’ve seen. It includes an interview with Britton Bertran, the man behind Installator, a widely popular tumblr focused on images documenting the art installation process; a photo essay by Victor Hugo in which the tools of art installation become the work itself; and a how to article by Inball Straus that describes how a custom made clamshell shaped pouch helps protect irregularly shaped objects.

All of these articles focus on art handling in some way, but more broadly, labor as it exists in the market. These are great successes, but as a new independent publication, they still have many hurdles to clear. Number one is funding. I talk to Art Handler Magazine Founder and Editor in Chief Clynton Lowry about his new Kickstarter Campaign and the magazine itself.

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Superscript: Two Days in an Auditorium with Art Critics

by Paddy Johnson on June 4, 2015
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Let me tell you about what I learned.

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On Taking AIM! The Business of Being An Artist Today

by Paddy Johnson on April 12, 2011
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Add Marysol Nieves “Taking AIM: The Business of Being An Artist Today” to the list of new resource books aimed at emerging artists. Published by Fordham University Press and The Bronx Museum of The Arts, the book begins with a long discussion of the Bronx Museum’s Artists in The Marketplace (AIM) with Executive Director Holly Block and former Program Facilitator┬áJackie Battenfield. A well-known and competitive professional training program for emerging artists, the interview reflected on the program, and kicks off a book celebrating AIM's 30th anniversary with a series of interviews, testimonials and commentary. Chapters are titled after profession, institution type, and any other cog in the New York art world’s wheel.

Occasionally stale albeit informative the first two chapters get off to a slow start. A low point was reached when Kate Gilmore offered “make good work” as sage advice to emerging artists. I'm sure this will solve all sorts of problems in studios across New York.

I’m not going to review the book in its entirety, as each essay and interview is significantly different than the next, but Anton Vidokle’s “Art Without Market” clearly stands out as worthy of reflection.

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