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Carlos Martiel

Do It Slow: A Conversation With Sara Reisman on ‘Enacting Stillness’

by Emily Colucci on December 20, 2016
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Stillness as a form of protest is nothing new. There are numerous examples of die-ins, sit-ins and even, hunger strikes that mobilize through immobility. And yet, at a time when many are searching for methods of resistance to Trump’s upcoming administration, a reminder of the potential power of stillness seems necessary.

A current exhibition at The 8th Floor provides this much-needed refresher. Enacting Stillness gathers a group of artists who use slow moving bodies and themes of waiting, silence or inaction in order to provoke dialogue and maybe even, political change.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: LOLs & Other Post-Internet Feels

by Michael Anthony Farley and Rea McNamara on April 13, 2016
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This is a good week for the arts. Wednesday night, head to e-flux for performances by Viktoria Naraxsa and a talk from Pussy Riot’s Nadezhda Tolokonnikova. Thursday night promises even more glamour, when Malik Gaines discusses disco legend Sylvester at The Artist’s Institute. Meanwhile, Olga Balema will be presenting her modified map pieces at the Swiss Institute.

Friday night, you’ll finally be glad for the G Train, with the all-day Theorizing the Web conference at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens followed by a night of openings in Brooklyn. Be sure to catch performances at the opening of Low Grade Euphoria by the Flushing Ave station, then continue to Gowanus for openings at Ortega y Gasset and Trestle Gallery. Saturday, the Cue Foundation will teach you the all-important skill of art handling, followed by an evening of unpacking a different type of baggage at Kimbery-Klark by Alex Ito and Masami Kubo. Sunday afternoon, hang with queer performance artists at Flux Factory for the latest installment of the do you: open source series.

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