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Devin Kenny

Sign Up for the AFC Workshops Today!

by The AFC Staff on May 4, 2016
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From URL to IRL, how does an artist stake out their territory in the 21st Century? By teaming up with peer-run initiatives outside the scope of traditional institutions to skillshare and collaborate. Enter, the Art F City Workshops, a series of courses led by artists, educators and art-world insiders designed to give artists the tools they need to get ahead. From learning how to make an online exhibition to figuring out a digital archiving plan for your artworks, these workshops will not only give attendees the skills they need to work in more digital mediums but help them to manage their art online and off.

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New Free Courses, Brooklyn Headquarters for BHQFU Spring Semester

by Michael Anthony Farley on January 13, 2016
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The Bruce High Quality Foundation University is back with new free courses—and bigger/better/badder than ever after a move to Brooklyn.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Depression Filmmaking, Magic Painting, an Actual Discussion on Gentrification

by Whitney Kimball on January 26, 2015
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Once the sidewalks are shoveled, we have no excuse. AFC’s Paddy Johnson curated a show; Busby Berkeley screens at Light Industry; politicians will be confronted about gentrification, among other picks.

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An Informal Survey of Swag: The Sociology of Hip Hop In the Micro-World of Emerging Net Art

by Jennifer Chan on September 14, 2012
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Cultural studies has established that suburban white kids love hip hop in a complex manner; heaps has been written on aspiration, colorblindedness, misogynism, emulation, and subordination. But just what makes hip hop so appealing to net artists? Instead of passing off any attempt to indulge in hip hop as a 1:1 relationship between appropriation and mockery, I’m interested in looking at how different artists incorporate hip hop in their artwork to talk about themselves.

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