Posts tagged as:

installation art

Back To Nature In Loren Nosan’s “The World Was Good Once”

by Emily Colucci on September 8, 2016
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It’s not everyday that you have to sign a waiver before entering an art installation. However, that’s exactly how my trip to Loren Nosan’s The World Was Good Once began.

Turning off a main road, straight into a grassy field outside Wassaic, it became obvious why the waiver and my emergency contact information were necessary. Nosan’s installation is located in a looming, desolate and derelict barn that looks like it went through hell–or at least, a meth lab explosion. Before allowing viewers to look around the show, Nosan pointed out unsound areas of the barn’s floor, which were scattered with holes where the building’s property manager had previously fallen through. Yikes…

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Taking A Curatorial Gamble At The Mattress Factory’s “Factory Installed”

by Emily Colucci on September 6, 2016
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PITTSBURGH–What do you get when a curatorial vision is so generic, there’s almost nothing for an artist to work with? The Mattress Factory rolled these dice with their current show Factory Installed and came out ahead. Or at least 50/50, which for a show with no organizational principle, is pretty good.

According to the exhibition’s website, the organization started with a selection of artists who “demonstrate a uniquely different approach to the creative process.” You can’t get more generic than that.

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Say Yes To Death With Rachel Stern At Black & White Gallery/Project Space

by Emily Colucci on July 20, 2016
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Why does the division between life and death always seem narrower in the American South? Maybe it’s the prevalence of ghost stories or just the spooky imagery of Spanish moss hanging from a live oak tree.

Rachel Stern delves into this tenuous Southern boundary between life and death in her current solo exhibition Yes, Death at Black & White Gallery/Project Space. And what could be more emblematic of the transition into the afterlife than cemeteries?

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