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Jessica Stoller

This Week’s Must-See Art Events: F.A.G.’s Strange Genitals & More

by Paddy Johnson and Michael Anthony Farley on October 31, 2016
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If ever there was a week for art nerds, this is it. It begins Tuesday with a screening of artist made music-videos Otion Front Studio and a show of meticulously assembled abstract paper works by Jessica Dickinson and Alison Knowles at James Fuentes. Paper nerds and music nerds unite. By Friday, gallery goers will be heading to Transfer Gallery to witness a room full of projectors showcasing a playlist of works by a dozen or more new media artists.  New Media nerds rejoice.

In between all this nerdery, there are also quite a few exhibitions promising a good time, not the least of which being our very own Strange Genitals, which opens this Thursday at AICAD. Following this, is the always provocative Marilyn Minter at the Brooklyn Museum come Friday and Jennifer Catron and Paul Outlaw’s performance looking at how the relationship between gravity and politics leads to the break-down of thought. Catron and Outlaw promise an “assembly of libations” after their performance, so don’t make any plans for Sunday.

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Art F City’s Strange Genitals Opens Next Thursday at AICAD Seminar Gallery

by The AFC Staff on October 26, 2016
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Announcing the AFC curated show our readers could have predicted.

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Sugar Shock: An Interview With Jessica Stoller

by Emily Colucci on July 15, 2016
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Dainty and delicate, porcelain is not the typical medium for radical feminist art. However, Brooklyn-based artist Jessica Stoller’s porcelain sculptures seem closer to Karen Finley’s chocolate sauce-drenched performances than precious Royal Doulton figurines.

Depicting oozing glaze, dripping sickeningly sweet confections, rippling flesh and cavorting nudes, Stoller’s sculptures shatter the normally quaint porcelain subject matter. She subverts long held standards of female beauty, consumption and femininity by using this historically charged medium to portray the grotesque.

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