Posts tagged as:

Josef Albers

Stella Forces Museum Closures, Delays Whitney Biennial Opening Gala

by Michael Anthony Farley on March 14, 2017
Thumbnail image for Stella Forces Museum Closures, Delays Whitney Biennial Opening Gala

Winter Storm Stella has forced most of the city’s museums to close today, including the Whitney. Today was supposed to mark the member preview and VIP gala for the Whitney Biennial.

Only MoMA stands tall against the storm.

Read the full article →

This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Give Thanks for Kate Bush

by Michael Anthony Farley on November 21, 2016
Thumbnail image for This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Give Thanks for Kate Bush

It’s a slow week, but one with just enough good events to keep any Thanksgiving-related food coma at bay. Monday night, we’ve got two book release events with talks and more! Fragments of Metropolis – Rhein & Ruhr launches with a panel discussion at NYU’s Deutsches Haus and Douglas Crimp: Before Pictures is kicking-off at The Kitchen. Tuesday, rising video art star Sondra Perry speaks at SVA and bitforms gallery returns to its roots for a homecoming party. Wednesday, MoMA opens a Josef Albers exhibit that shows the color guru’s dark(room) side.

Thursday is Thanskgiving, so there are no art events. But if you can’t deal with the potential of seeing a Trump-supporting relative, I recommend teaming up with friends to support local immigrant-owned businesses instead! Post-holiday, there’s a bit of a slowdown. On Black Friday, check out a campy screening at Williamsburg’s Spectacle theater. Saturday Pioneer Works is hosting the Eyeworks Festival of Experimental Animation. If that’s not your thing, head to Roulette, where artists reinterpret the music of Kate Bush. That’s one thing we can all be thankful for.

Read the full article →

This Week’s Must See Art Events: Dad Art, Cigarettes, and Graveyards

by Michael Anthony Farley and Rea McNamara on May 10, 2016
Thumbnail image for This Week’s Must See Art Events: Dad Art, Cigarettes, and Graveyards

Thankfully, the next few days aren’t as stressfully-packed with events as Frieze Week was. But we’ve picked out a handful of options if you’re still hankering to see some art. Tuesday night, Matt Bolinger’s solo show opens at Zurcher Gallery, featuring cinematic paintings of Middle-American life. Wednesday, rising art-star Kour Pour opens a new exhibition at Feuer/Mesler that looks to be a new direction for the painter. Thursday is a big night for fans of drawing: David Nolan Gallery has a Jorinde Voigt show and The Drawing Center is offering a Josef Albers-inspired workshop.

The weekend is when things get weirder. Christopher K. Ho’s solo exhibition at Present Company looks at aging, “art dads”, religion, and more Friday night. At the same time, Invisible Exports is opening Frida Smoked, a group show about women artists and their cigarettes. Saturday, Rhizome’s annual Seven on Seven conference will present collaborations between tech insiders and artists and Underdonk will open an ambitious group show of tiny sculptures from dozens of artists. Borna Sammak’s solo show also opens at American Medium that night. But Sunday sounds like it will be the most fun—Hyperalleric has organized a walking tour of artist’s graves in Green-Wood cemetery, so go enjoy the partially-sunny outdoors after a rainy weekend.

Read the full article →

Recommended Shows, Pt. 2: Erica Baum at Bureau

by Paddy Johnson on September 24, 2014
Thumbnail image for Recommended Shows, Pt. 2: Erica Baum at Bureau

Good abstract visual poetry exists. Take Erica Baum’s The Paper Nautilus at Bureau. In square photographic prints, Baum zooms in on the dog-ears on illustrated book pages– cropping the frame so that the square photograph is split diagonally from bottom left to top right corner, by the page crease. The dog ears, and the corner of the page beneath them, retain only triangular corners of illustrations and photographs. There’s no linear meaning to be drawn from these works, and yet, the mismatched pairings of triangles form a stable visual rhythm. The abstract squares resemble Josef Albers’s color studies, only in grayscale, and printed out on a dot matrix printer.

Read the full article →