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Judith Scott

Katherine Bradford and Drawing for Sculpture: Swimmers and Gender Politics

by Paddy Johnson on January 22, 2016
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With a snow storm threatening the weekend gallery goer routines of most New Yorkers, perhaps only the most intrepid will make out tomorrow and Sunday. But for those who haven’t yet seen today’s recommended shows—Katherine Bradford at CANADA and Drawing for Sculpture at Tiger Strikes Astroid (Bushwick) I have good news: both run through February 15th. You’ve got time.

And that’s a good thing, because pretty much any serious art lover in the city needs to see CANADA’s Katherine Bradford show, “Fear of Waves”.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Depression Filmmaking, Magic Painting, an Actual Discussion on Gentrification

by Whitney Kimball on January 26, 2015
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Once the sidewalks are shoveled, we have no excuse. AFC’s Paddy Johnson curated a show; Busby Berkeley screens at Light Industry; politicians will be confronted about gentrification, among other picks.

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Recommended Show: Judith Scott at the Brooklyn Museum

by Whitney Kimball on December 10, 2014
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Free from the burdens of art history and its criticisms, the sculptures show at a base level what artmaking fills for a person. What’s life like without irony or calculation? For an art critic, that’s a mystery, one that makes this body of work a crucial point of reference.

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Why the Independent Art Fair Works

by Whitney Kimball on March 9, 2012
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The Independent Art Fair's great gift: eye contact. With vast ceilings, large windows, and no cubicle-style booths, people aren’t constantly scanning the room behind you to locate James Franco. This means no angry smiles, no high-speed nodding, and no cracked-out active listening. The tone is friendlier. Admission is free, and light is ample. Much of the work is genuinely interesting. Open space literally translates an air of transparency; though this is still no place for an art experience, it feels closer to an exhibition than a department store.

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