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Lorna Mills

This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Avoiding Anything Armory Edition

by Michael Anthony Farley and Rea McNamara on March 1, 2016
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Art-fair haters rejoice! The Armory Week Fairs are upon us, but there is art to see and events to attend that don’t require traveling through the halls of a convention center. Take the launch of Lorna Mills’ monthly GIF presentation on the electronic billboards of Times Square as part of Times Square Arts, or the opening of the Artist’s Institute’s new uptown home, which will kick off its six month season focused on the inimitable Hilton Als. Both take place outside of an art fair booth and in the real world!

Looking to escape the fairs this weekend? Flux Factory launches the Fung Wah Biennial, presenting the work of artists on the Chinatown bus routes. This Saturday, the destination is Boston, so if you’re looking for a post-Armory ride, this might be the ticket. (But act quick: as of writing, ten tickets are left.)

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Talking GIFs, Kissing Painting, Watching Dogs

by Michael Anthony Farley on February 16, 2016
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What a week for New York City! From the small gestures aimed at pedestrians, like project space FOUR A.M. in the Lower East Side, to the triumphant return of Jack Early to Chelsea on Thursday night, we’ve got you covered on weeknights. Our very own Paddy Johnson will be speaking at NYU on Friday all about our favorite medium: GIFs. Be sure to pre-register for the event, which has a reception where you can say hi! Then, head to Bushwick for a night of group and two-person shows at neighboring artist-run spaces Tiger Strikes Asteroid, Transmitter, and Underdonk. Saturday, check out perpetual AFC fav Alex Ebstein’s yoga mat paintings at Ridgewood’s lorimoto. But Sunday might be the day that goes down as one of the weirdest and most fun in the city’s art history: Greater New York artist Hayley Aviva Silverman is mashing-up 1990s disaster cinema with 1830s literature for a theatrical production starring dogs. Let that singular experience marinate on your 35 minute M train ride to Chinatown Soup, where Joyce Yu-Jean Lee’s pop-up cybercafe promises to give us a glimpse of what the internet looks like in China (hint: very different) plus snacks!

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: The Roving Eye

by Paddy Johnson and Rea McNamara on February 1, 2016
Yes, this is a Lorna Mills GIF.

Yes, this is a Lorna Mills GIF.

Legacies, transitions and milestones loom largely in this week’s slate of events. Black History Month kicks off in Harlem tonight at the Schomburg Center with a panel featuring Juliana Huxtable and Kimberly Drew among others dwelling on Basquiat’s life and legacy. Further on the BHM-related tip, decolonial knowledge is dropped by Tabita Rezaire at MoCADA’s Window Gallery, and the representation of black and queer personhood is re-assessed in Sondra Perry’s selection of video works for MoMA PS1’s Sunday Session.

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Will Electronic Superhighway Accurately Historicize New Media and Internet Art?

by Rea McNamara on November 13, 2015
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How has technology impacted art? Whitechapel Gallery will be addressing this question in a landmark exhibition launching in January 2016. Entitled Electronic Superhighway (2016-1966), the show will bring together over 100 multimedia artworks from the past 50 years. Over 70 artists will be involved, including Nam June Paik, Cory Arcangel, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Hito Steyerl, Jeremy Bailey, Amalia Ulman, Douglas Coupland and Judith Barry.

The show is clearly a major coup for its curator, Omar Kholeif, whose rise in the artworld has garnered comparisons with Hans Ulrich Obrist. It’s an ambitious survey that is much needed in a genre still struggling for institutional validation. So, it’s concerning that a majority of the internet art represented in the show will come via the archives of new media non-profit, Rhizome. While Rhizome has substantially impacted collecting and preserving digital art works, they still only represent the perspective of one organization.

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