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Mark Leckey

Mark Leckey Made Me Hardcore at MoMA PS1

by Emily Colucci on November 11, 2016
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It’s hard not to see any art through the lens of politics this week. Trump’s unexpected victory leaves little space for anything else–nearly any experience has a surreal quality to it.

I’m not going to say I don’t find this disruptive to the critical process. The context of evaluating art has changed. What was relevant seems useless post-Trump. But since there’s no way around it, I’ve decided to embrace it. In the case of Mark Leckey’s Containers and Their Drivers at MoMA PS1, I found his career-long satirical engagement with technology amusing on Monday. Today, though, three days after the American people decided to press the country’s self-destruct button, I’m left wondering if the show even weathered this sudden change in perspective.

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Recommended Shows: Robert Gober at MoMA and Cartoons at the SculptureCenter

by Corinna Kirsch on October 8, 2014
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Decades after their making, Gober’s room-size installations can still fill viewers with pangs of rage. At the SculptureCenter, Camille Henrot and Ruba Katrib have put together a drippy, rubbery, slithery show themed around silliness.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Sculpture!

by Paddy Johnson Whitney Kimball and Corinna Kirsch on September 29, 2014
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If your preferred form of sculpture is a little weirder than the Richard Serra variety—you’re in luck.

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Our Take On “The Cat Show” at White Columns—With Kitty Pics!

by Corinna Kirsch on June 20, 2013
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The Cat Show at White Columns has everything and nothing to do with cats. Everything, because most of the 134 artworks show cats or cat-related ephemera—like litter boxes, scratching posts, or yarn. Nothing, because the themes of many of these works aren’t about cats at all.

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