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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Augmented Reality, Black Lives Matter, Bromoeroticism, and More

by Michael Anthony Farley on August 1, 2016
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It’s August. Very few people are having openings. Which is okay, because you can catch up on some other activities. Such as reading and sports! Head to Printed Matter’s pop-up on Tuesday, then head down to Basketball City for a friendly game with the folks from NADA. Wednesday, the Con Artist Collective is having a $99 art sale in the spirit of a Lower East Side Bodega. Thursday, the New Museum has all sorts of techy delights as they unveil New INC projects and Carter Burden Gallery is hosting a trifecta of medium-specific shows. End the night at the Brooklyn Museum, where Juliana Huxtable will be DJing from within a Tom Sachs installation (uh, hello all my favorite things!). Friday, identity politics gets graphic with Sean O’Connor’s wallpaper-like paintings of homoerotic sports stuff at the Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art and Carla Cubit’s Black Lives Matter posters at chashama.

The Queens Museum is on-point with public programming on Saturday, from plastic bag portraits from Nobutaka Aozaki in Flushing and artist tours of Newtown Creek, where many plastic bags have been flushed. And Sunday, there’s Alma Thomas’s dreamy abstract watercolors uptown at the Studio Museum or some timely dystopian cinema at BAM. Thank you, institutions, for giving us stuff to do while the Chelsea crowd is off using “summer” as a verb.

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We Went to NADA: No Spider Bites Yet

by Paddy Johnson and Michael Anthony Farley on May 6, 2016
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Paddy: Raging contemporary art trends: pastels, particularly in pink, smiley faces, plants, tropical themes of any sort, the 80’s.
Michael: I suppose I am always grasping for something to reassure me abstraction still has teeth and relevance beyond decor—even if that means a representational painting of tiny abstract paintings.

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The Art F City Guide to Frieze Week 2016

by Paddy Johnson and Rea McNamara on May 2, 2016
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Here we go again. Put on your best black outfit and prepare to network! It’s Frieze Week in New York. The collectors will be out buying.  The dealers will be out dealing.  And the press will be out chattering.

As per usual, we’ve put together our annual art fair guide. We don’t promise it will be the comprehensive guide you’ll find. There are other blogs out there for that. But we do promise that we won’t waste your time. If a fair’s not worth your time, we’ll let you know.

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Material Art Fair: The Most Important Art Event of the Year for Artists

by Paddy Johnson and Michael Anthony Farley on February 5, 2016
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For years we’ve sung the praises of NADA, an artist-centric fair that celebrates and works to commodify the strange, the creative and the wonder. In 2015, though, we began to question the model. Was NADA a bit stale compared to recent years? Was ARTIST RUN, a new fair that celebrates the DIY artist, closer to our interests?

These questions came up a lot yesterday at the Material Art Fair in Mexico City, which AFC staff writer Michael Anthony Farley described as a “great compromise between ARTIST RUN and NADA. Farley was referring to the structure of the fair, which invited more dealers than artists to participate, but retained the artistic energy and life essential to new art by keeping the booth prices low. It’s a great fair.

I agree the sentiment, but would put it a little differently: Material tells us that NADA can easily be replicated.

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The Best of Art F City, 2015

by Rea McNamara on December 31, 2015
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Revisiting the ‘Simple Net Art Diagram’, reviewing an art fair’s virtual tour, calling out Georg Baselitz, breaking news on the USC MFA Class, and even bringing back nerdocracy. Readers, we truly feel a real sense of accomplishment for the stories we wrote in 2015, especially after amassing them in a ‘Best of’ list such as this. We not only paid artists to attend art fairs, but also investigated sexism is arts publishing and even had two Renaissance cosmetics experts dish on body hair removal. Who else publishes this shit? No one.

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Who Wore it Better? ABMB Edition

by Michael Anthony Farley on December 5, 2015
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Inevitably, some people pack the same looks for Miami.

Remember NADA’s legendary pool parties at the Deauville? There always seemed to be at least two art-bros who showed up in the same “statement” bathing suit from American Apparel. But it’s usually more awkward when gallerists inadvertently dress their booths too similarly.

Below, we take a look at accidental twinsies and judge who wore it better:

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NADA Disappoints Again

by Paddy Johnson on December 4, 2015
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I’ve been thinking a lot about AFC writer Michael Anthony Farley’s post on NADA yesterday. It’s a great summary of NADA highlights and assessment of the fair’s strengths this year. I felt a little disappointed by the fair, though, and I’ve been depressed about it most of it day. Aside from the obvious problems such as a needless maze-like layout and a lack of adventurous auxiliary programming, they continue to peddle a kind of disingenuous kind of class posturing I find increasingly grating.

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