Posts tagged as:

NEA

Why Art Doesn’t Pay

by Corinna Kirsch on April 1, 2014
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Artists pay, institutions don’t. Let’s discuss.

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Study Finds the NEA Serves Both Rich and Poor (Kind of)

by Corinna Kirsch on February 5, 2014
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2013 was a year like many others. The sun came out in the mornings, and government officials tried to shut down the National Endowment for the Arts.

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What You Should Know About the NEA Shutdown, in Bullet Points

by Corinna Kirsch on October 3, 2013
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The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), like nearly all federal agencies, is totally shut down. What this means, after the jump.

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Five Facts About Professional Artists That Aren’t Exactly True

by Corinna Kirsch on July 3, 2013
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Artists make up a mere 1.4% of the labor force. California is an artist’s haven. One in ten artists in D.C. makes more than $125,000 a year. These statements come straight out of The Washington Post’s recent essay, “Five facts about professional artists”. Taken on face value, they paint a desperate, unforgiving portrait of the artist’s uphill plight: jobs are scarce, the pay is paltry, and women aren’t making out too well.

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Weekend Links!

by Paddy Johnson on October 30, 2011

  • NEA study finds “artists’ median wages and salaries ($43,000 in 2009) are higher than the median for the whole labor force ($39,000). Yet artists as a whole earn far less than the median wage of the “professional” category of workers ($54,000), to which they belong.” Not sure how valuable these findings are though, given that these numbers are drawn by lumping designers, architects, artists and writers into one group. [NEA]
  • Cartoonist Lynda Barry Will Make You Believe in Yourself. [NYTimes]
  • Karen Rosenberg dislikes slides, pools and anything else fun. A reasonable position on the Höller show at the New Museum, but it’s too bad she ends up sounding like a stick-in-the-mud. [NYTimes]
  • Jacob Kassay, the art world’s newest art star, describes his work as “much more boring than people are taking it for”. He makes achromatic surfaces by dipping canvases in electrified silver solution. I suspect part of the reason this work is so popular amongst collectors is that it’s impossible to document. [The New Yorker: Warning, Paywall!]
  • Recommended: Jeannette Doyle at The Warhol Museum. [Warhol.org]
  • Upcoming: The Reluctant Doctorate, A PHD program for artists at SVA. A bunch of PHDs talk about whether this is a good idea. November 3rd. [SVA]
  • Apparently Peter Schjeldahl supports Occupy Museums. [Paddy Johnson]
  • Watch Slavoj Zizek talk about Occupy Wall Street. [Youtube]
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Massive Links! Censorship Showdown | NEA Throw-Down | DC Has a Warhol Ho-down

by Reid Singer on September 15, 2011
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The National Endowment for the Arts launches an ambitious new initiative. The Met raked it in for New York this summer. A beneficiary of copyright laws applauds efforts to undermine them. Andy Warhol’s eminent star quality remains high, unexplained.

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House GOP attempt to zero out NEA, NEH fails | Tyler Green: Modern Art Notes | ARTINFO.com

by Paddy Johnson on August 10, 2011

House GOP attempt to zero out NEA, NEH fails | Tyler Green: Modern Art Notes | ARTINFO.com – That the vote to entirely eliminate the NEA failed is encouraging for numbers against bill — 284-126 — but that this is even being voted on does not make me happy.

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My Eyeballs Work Anywhere: On Demographic Destiny

by Paddy Johnson on March 29, 2011
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People are engaging in art online in higher numbers than ever before, but are they visiting galleries and attending arts events? A fascinating 78 page study published by the NEA, Age and Arts Participation: A Case Against Demographic Destiny, tracks among other things the decline of “the omnivore”, a demographic known for its interest in […]

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