Posts tagged as:

New Yorker

Hans Ulrich Obrist, the Champion of Art Consumption

by Whitney Kimball on December 2, 2014
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This week, the New Yorker published a 10,000 word resumé spilling even more verbiage about Obrist’s curatorial style of vacuuming information and returning marathonic shows in an on-the-go 24-hour art viewing lifestyle.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Pussy Riot Comes to Brooklyn, SculptureCenter Explores Time

by Anthony Hicks Corinna Kirsch Whitney Kimball on February 3, 2014
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Brave the cold just a little longer, for we have so much art to see this week. Talks abound, from B. Wurtz on the history of sculpture to Winkleman Gallery’s panel on African-Americans in Soviet culture. We have openings, like a feminist sound art retrospective at CUNY and Greenpoint’s winter open studios night. Round out Sunday with a Genesis Breyer P-Orridge film-screening and book launch at PS1 and we’ll call it a week. Just grin and bear it.

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Week Four: Dennis Rodman at the Folk Art Museum

by Corinna Kirsch on November 26, 2013
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Dream Exhibitions is a new weekly series that asks artists, writers, curators, and other creative types what as-yet unrealized exhibition they’d like to see.

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#Longreads: Understanding Owls

by Whitney Kimball on October 26, 2012
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In which we send you on your weekend with our favorite long read. This week, it’s David Sedaris.

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People Had Problems With the Art Market Eighty Years Ago

by Whitney Kimball on March 1, 2012
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Still think the Art Workers Coalition were the first to object publicly to the art market? Nay. Way back in the 1920s, the New Yorker’s first art critic, Murdock Pemberton, was a vocal opponent of the starving artist ideal. Many of his writings echo those of contemporary critics and, more recently, Occupy Wall Street groups. His granddaughter, Sally Pemberton, has spent the past two years mining his archives and recently published a scrapbook portrait of Pemberton and his peers. The following are pieces from the New Yorker and lecture notes which Ms. Pemberton found in her grandfather’s suitcase in 2009.

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AFC’s Halloween Headline Wishlist

by Paddy Johnson on October 31, 2011
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The day’s only half way through, which means the AFC office has taken to placing bets on what the rest of today’s Halloween content will look like on the art interwebs. Some headlines we consider likely from our favorite art publishers.

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Jerry Saltz Beyond Thunderdome: Folk Art Museum Architecture Defended By Critics

by Paddy Johnson on May 17, 2011
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Still more writers think critics Jerry Saltz and Roberta Smith should not be blaming The Folk Art Museum’s architecture for its financial woes. First NY Mag Saltz colleague Justin Davidson piped in Thursday, calling it akin to “faulting Mercedes-Benz for making such lovely cars that minimum-wage workers go bankrupt buying them”, and now Paul Goldberger at The New Yorker says architects can only work with what they are given.

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