Posts tagged as:

Paul Schimmel

Monday Links: The Home Depot-Sized Art Gallery

by Paddy Johnson on February 8, 2016

  • I gotta say, the new Beyonce video “Formation” (dirty) is pretty incredible. Pretty amazing to see such a political video played at the Super Bowl. [The Internet]
  • The Hauser & Wirth in Los Angeles sounds like it will be a sight to behold. It’s 100,000 square feet—the size of a Home Depot—and will be modeled off the Kunsthalle — a nonc-ollecting art museum. Except, of course, that this gallery will sell art. Curator and partner Paul Schimmel is organizing the first show, which will be a historic survey of women working in sculpture. [Culture: High & Low]
  • According to Knoedler & Company’s accountant, apart from the sale of the fakes, the company did not make money. [artnet News]
  • Speaking the Knoedler & Company, Ann Freedman, the former president of New York’s Knoedler gallery has settled a lawsuit with collectors Domenico and Eleanore De Sole over the sale of a forged Mark Rothko purchased from Knoedler in 2004. The piece sold for $8.3 million. The terms have not been disclosed. [Artnews]
  • Quote of the year:

So since Hillary cannot yell, since by the virtue of being sane and not a white man she is forced to be the biggest adult in the room, just like Obama has had to for eight goddamn years, I will yell for her.

FIRST AND FUCKING FOREMOST, COOL, YOU LIKE BERNIE’S WISHES AND DREAMS APPROACH TO POLITICS. “FREE COLLEGE FOR EVERYONE AND A GODDAMN PONY.” YES, THAT SOUNDS FUCKING WONDERFUL BUT DO YOU THINK HILLARY COULD EVEN SAY THOSE WORDS WITHOUT FOX NEWS LITERALLY BURYING HER ALIVE IN TAMPONS AND CRUCIFIXES? [Pajiba via: Hyperallergic]

  • Leave it to Hyperallergic to create the longest, most comprehensive link list of art news out there. Say good-bye to your afternoon [Hyperallergic]
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Everyone in Their Twenties Looks Gorgeous: Deborah Kass on Her New Show at Sargent’s Daughters

by Paddy Johnson on May 20, 2015
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Who’s heading to Deborah Kass’s opening at Sargent’s Daughters tonight? She’ll be showing two years of paintings from her series “America’s Most Wanted” (1998-1999), which draws on Andy Warhol’s similarly named series, “13 Most Wanted Men.” Kass, a long-time feminist and spokesperson for the arts, has our interest.

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Best of AFC: Summer Edition

by The AFC Staff on August 30, 2013
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Did you beach too hard and forget to read this summer? Fear not, art lovers, for we bring you the second annual AFC Best of Summer list. We’ve brought together the blog’s greatest summer hits from staff and contributors, because, let’s face it, you might have missed out on days or weeks of AFC when you were traveling to Venice, Basel, or closer to home, the Rockaways. We’ve published some great artist essays with our STUFF series, started our “Diary of a Mad Gallery Owner” series, and continued to bring you reviews and opinion pieces. Enjoy.

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Reflections on Paul Schimmel’s Move to Hauser & Wirth

by Corinna Kirsch on May 24, 2013
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Nearly a year after Paul Schimmel’s controversial departure from MOCA as the museum’s long-standing chief curator in 2012, Schimmel has come out with his head high above water.

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Intellect and Instinct: Painting the Void and Exhibit, A at the MCA

by Robin Dluzen on March 15, 2013
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The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago has been on a roll recently. Rashid Johnson’s show “Message to Our Folks” was positively received this summer, as was their blockbuster “Skyscraper: Art and Architecture Against Gravity.” The MCA is still riding this wave of these successes with two massive exhibitions that are in many ways at opposite ends of the spectrum: the cool authoritarian aesthetic of Goshka Macuga’s “Exhibit, A” on one side, and the gritty, material anarchy of “Destroy the Picture: Painting the Void, 1949-1962” on the other.

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