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Petra Cortright

SLIDESHOW: Geographically Indeterminate Fantasies; The Animated GIF as Place at GRIN

by Michael Anthony Farley on June 9, 2016
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Last week, GRIN Gallery in Providence opened the AFC-curated exhibition Geographically Indeterminate Fantasies: The Animated GIF as Place. It’s the IRL version of our online exhibition with Providence College—Galleries and will be installed until July 2nd. GRIN sent us these install shots, and it’s pretty remarkable how different and complimentary the physical show feels to the online component.

In the gallery, we installed GIFs included in the online exhibition from Hugo Moreno, Sara Ludy, Petra Cortright, Dina Kelberman, Ying Miao, Clement Valla, and Gizelle Zatonyl as well as different works from Nicolas Sassoon and Wickerham & Lomax. We also installed two pieces from Victoria Fu: the video projection “Velvet Peel 2” and animated neon sculpture “Pinch-Zoom.” These are all about the way bodies relate to screens and illusionistic space, so Fu was a perfect fit for an IRL exhibition about digital spaces.

We also screened all of the GIFs in the exhibition as well as longer video works from the artists and longer-form GIFs from Jacolby Satterwhite. GRIN (60 Valley Street, Unit 3
Providence, RI) is hosting another outdoor screening on June 25th from 8 – 10 p.m., so if you didn’t catch the opening, be sure to check it out! We have to say, even if we hadn’t curated this show, we’d be giving it a giant neon thumbs-up.

Check out the photos after the jump.

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Geographically Indeterminate Fantasies: The Animated GIF as Place

by The AFC Staff on April 11, 2016
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Providence College—Galleries Launches Inaugural Online Exhibition
Geographically Indeterminate Fantasies: The Animated GIF as Place
Curated by Art F City critics Paddy Johnson, Michael Anthony Farley & Rea McNamara.

VIEW THE EXHIBITION: pcgalleries.providence.edu/GIF

As those subscribed to our mailing list will already know, today Providence College—Galleries launched its inaugural online exhibition “Geographically Indeterminate Fantasies: The Animated GIF as Place”. Curated by the Art F City team. Michael Anthony Farley, Paddy Johnson, and Rea McNarama, the show is the result of six months worth of planning, development and careful consideration. We are extremely proud of it.

Given that the press release has already gone out, we’re using the blog as the publishing platform for our curatorial essay. We hope it will give viewers a window into the sense of wonder we often have looking at these works.

Artists include: Peter Burr, Petra Cortright, Milton Melvin Croissant III, Elektra KB, Claire L Evans, Faith Holland, Dina Kelberman, Kidmograph (Gustavo Torres), Sara Ludy, Lauren Pelc-McArthur, Alex McLeod, Ying Miao, Jonathan Monaghan, Hugo Moreno, Brenna Murphy, Eva Papamargariti, Robby Rackleff, Sam Rolfes, Nicolas Sassoon, Jacolby Satterwhite,  Hito Steyerl, Tough Guy Mountain, Małgosia Woźnica (V5MT), Wickerham & Lomax, Clement Valla and Giselle Zatonyl.

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Can the Term “Gentrification” be Applied to the Internet?

by Rea McNamara on April 6, 2016
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On Monday, luxury lifestyle website Amuse published an interview with Petra Cortright, in which she used the term “gentrification” to describe how the internet is now less weird.

“I think the internet is becoming this really gentrified place,” the LA-based digital artist told writer Iona Goulder. “Today’s forms of social media feels more like people’s personal brands. Now it’s just people promoting their shit constantly and it makes stuff on the internet less weird. Everything feels more censored.”

Boosted by the interview’s SEO-driven headline — ”Petra Cortright on the Gentrification of the Internet” — the story circulated through my social feeds this week, eventually provoking a dust-up within some of my internet art circles. Cortright is among the increasing number of artists whose practices were shaped by the surf club era and who have gained bricks-and-mortar gallery representation and Rhizome cataloguing, so an overarching criticism of her statement stemmed from the perceived entitlement of an early internet user. There is an enduring fondness that borders on immaterial fetishization for a time when the internet was this unfettered, non-indexed boon of online amateur cultural production.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: You Won’t Die Trying to See it All

by Michael Anthony Farley on March 8, 2016
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Finally, a manageable week for New York. If you survived Armory Week and still want to look at art, we salute you. Thankfully, this is a calm week for the city. While we’re busy preparing for our own Spring Break fundraiser next week, you can also unwind with some low-key art events. Thursday, check out several centuries of the macabre at Ricco/Maresca Gallery. Friday, return to the living with Genesis Breyer P-Orridge’s reincarnation-informed solo show at Rubin Museum of Art. Then head to the Bruce High Quality Foundation’s Sunset Park digs for an artist talk and party to kick off the BHQFU Book Fair. Be sure to come back Saturday for more readings, activities, and goodies from vendors. Sunday, check out Foxy Production’s new Chatham Square digs. Save your energy, though, because you’ll want it for our party next week!

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GIF of the Day: Petra Cortright’s System Landscapes

by Paddy Johnson on August 24, 2015

Petra Cortright

Petra Cortright’s floral digital paintings command a lot of attention these days, but given the choice, I’d pretty much always look her system landscape GIFs from 2007. Perhaps it’s just a preference for her choice of media, but I also consider the work more important for its early example use of the computer environment as a compositional device. We see that a lot more commonly now—new and established artists like Camille HenrotSondra Perry and Saul Chernick have all used the commuter screen to frame their work with great success—and with good reason. It has a large presence in our minds and shapes how we see the world. Cortright was sensitive to this earlier then most.

Unlike most landscapes, which suggest passage through them, many of the animations in this series show us the places, but prevent us from entering. At every mapping stage there are broken notices like “Try Again.” and “Door is Closed.” Later in the sequence, the images switch to small growing flowers surrounded by wire frames that size up as the plants get bigger. By the end the windows have become tiny. “Connected” reads one, followed by “Disconnected.” Ten “Cloud Forest”, then a seemingly endless number of tiny squares with landscapes, each reading “Away Message.” “I’m back!”

system

flowers

away

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Hi, Artists! Autumn 2015 IMG MGMT Application Now Open

by The AFC Staff on July 6, 2015
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We’re now accepting applications for our autumn 2015 IMG MGMT series! Deadline is August 1.

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Selling Women: A Very Unpopular Choice at Phillips’ “Under the Influence”

by Corinna Kirsch on February 18, 2015
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Part one: We look at the spring iteration of “Under the Influence”, to be held this March at Phillips in New York.

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