Posts tagged as:

Rachel Whiteread

We Went to Bushwick with Gawker’s Adrian Chen, Part 2 of 2

by The AFC Staff on March 5, 2013
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Bushwick may be the last stop on our “We Went To” series, but we brought primo bloggerazzi Adrian Chen of Gawker. Be afraid, Bushwick.

In this post we discuss: Luhring Augustine, Fuchs Projects, Interstate Projects, and Storefront Bushwick.

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New Reviews in Brief: First Chelsea, then the World

by Will Brand on April 19, 2011
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It’s tough finding time in an art critic’s busy schedule to criticize art, but we managed it this week. Our Reviews in Brief section is back with a vengeance, and we’ll be expanding it significantly over the next few months; too much goes unreported in this town, and we want to opine on the shows that fly under the radar just as much as the game-changers and train wrecks. For now, five shows we saw over the weekend in Chelsea.

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Rachel Whiteread at Luhring Augustine

by Will Brand on April 18, 2011
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Rachel Whiteread: Long Eyes Date: SATURDAY, MARCH 26TH 2011 - SATURDAY, APRIL 30TH 2011 Venue: Luhring Augustine, 531 West 24th Street AFC’s Rating: 3/10 (Will Brand) Rachel Whiteread’s work is best when it explores unheralded spaces: the insides of houses; the undersides of chairs; the interstices between book and shelf. At her best, she reveals these subjects with an unexpectedness […]

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Art Fag City at The L Magazine: Small-Time Rachel Whiteread

by Paddy Johnson on April 13, 2011
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Size matters. Some art needs to be large to be effective; other works should be small. It’s a tricky game to figure out, and when a work fails for this reason, it’s inevitably awkward.

Rachel Whiteread’s current show of resin doors and windows at Luhring Augustine, Long Eyes (through April 30), is an unlikely example of scale failure. The majority of cast sculptures she’s exhibited in the past reproduce the original object without changing its size and many of those works are successful. I’ll never forget Whiteread’s cast plaster mattress, an object strangely resembling a fossilized relic of domestic life. That piece is occasionally on view at MoMA.

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