Posts tagged as:

Sascha Braunig

NADA on Top

by Paddy Johnson on December 3, 2016
Thumbnail image for NADA on Top

A cab driver told me there are fewer people in Miami beach this year due to Zika fears. An artist told me there were fewer artists in Miami due to Donald Trump’s election. Everyone tells me they have fair fatigue. But dealers, willing to refute any and all evidence to the contrary, say their fairs have been busy.

Whether or not anyone is suffering as a result, one thing is certain: attendance is way off from last year. There are fewer people in the streets and at the fairs across the board. Certainly this was the case at NADA yesterday, which was uncharacteristically quiet. Not that this seemed to bother the dealers. Most were relaxed and seemed content, having made their sales the day before. This stood in stark contrast to Pulse, where even the slightest expression of interest, inspired long sales pitches and desperate looks. I felt bad for them.

A slower pace and fewer jovial parties from most of the fairs came as a welcome relief, even if they were a result of election malaise. There are a few more grey hairs amongst all of us—including this reporter—and the giant, all day, courtyard parties at NADA have been replaced by a swag table and cafe that now serves fancy donuts.

The spirit, though, remains the same. More than any other fair, NADA’s dealers are defined by an investment in art that’s so intense it seems to demand generosity. For example, when visiting the Invisible Exports booth, Benjamin Tischer made a point introducing me to Jerry the Marble Faun at Situations. “That’s a rabbit hole you have to go down!” he beamed as he told me about the ceramics made by the gardener for Mrs. Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale and her daughter Edith Bouvier Beale. The two were decedents of Jacqueline Kennedy and famous for shunning the world after high society wouldn’t accept their eccentricities.

Tischer enthusiasm wasn’t an isolated incident. MacGregor Harp at 247365 recommended I see Raul de Nieves at The Company, because his beaded figurative sculptures look infused with joy and dance. And Phil Grauer, a NADA board member and partner at CANADA, offered some context. The fair wants to be more inclusive. Last year’s venue experiment with Fountainbleau didn’t work out that well for that reason. The hotel wouldn’t make more space available to the fair at a reasonable cost, so they were forced to reduce the size. It created an atmosphere they didn’t like, so they returned to The Deauville this year with the objective of offering more space to more dealers.

The efforts paid off. The fair looks and feels better. Perhaps most importantly, though, the quality art to crap ratio is better than anywhere else, making NADA the model, and fair to beat.

Highlights after the jump.

Read the full article →

This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Future Bodies are Everywhere and Terrifying

by Paddy Johnson and Michael Anthony Farley on October 17, 2016
Thumbnail image for This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Future Bodies are Everywhere and Terrifying

There’s plenty of heady discourse this week—future bodies, hypothetical architectures, theories of curation and criticism—and of course plenty of election-related hand-wringing.

Kick it off Monday night at Jersey City’s Word Bookstore, where the Brooklyn Institute of Social Research is inaugurating a lecture series about cyborgs. Or head to Manhattan’s Red Bull Studios for an event celebrating Grand Arts, the Kansas City project space that launched dozens of conceptual art projects and, now, a catalogue. Tuesday night, Paddy Johnson joins other art critics to talk shop at the Brooklyn Public Library’s Dweck Cultural Center, and Tyler Coburn talks genetic engineering and body mods as the future of humanity at e-flux. If you’re looking for something more hands-on (or a chance to move your feet), there’s a survey of handmade prints at Site:Brooklyn and an epic-looking disco fundraiser for El Museo del Bario Wednesday night. Thursday, White Box is opening a jam-packed group show (with some impressive names!) all about political angst. Friday we’ve got a talk from Maura Riley at Stony Brook Manhattan and Underdonk opening a class-conscious solo show by Patrice Renee Washington.

But the weekend brings us back to what we like the most: artwork that investigates the weird. Selena Gallery’s two person show from Dalia Amara and Florencia Escudero looks for uncanny surrogate female bodies in consumer goods on Saturday night. Sunday, Sascha Braunig’s work at MoMA will likely strike a similar chord. And MARC STRAUS opens a solo show by Chris Joneswho builds fantastical dioramas (pictured) from mundane images.

Read the full article →

This Week’s Must-See Art Events: You Won’t Die Trying to See it All

by Michael Anthony Farley on March 8, 2016
Thumbnail image for This Week’s Must-See Art Events: You Won’t Die Trying to See it All

Finally, a manageable week for New York. If you survived Armory Week and still want to look at art, we salute you. Thankfully, this is a calm week for the city. While we’re busy preparing for our own Spring Break fundraiser next week, you can also unwind with some low-key art events. Thursday, check out several centuries of the macabre at Ricco/Maresca Gallery. Friday, return to the living with Genesis Breyer P-Orridge’s reincarnation-informed solo show at Rubin Museum of Art. Then head to the Bruce High Quality Foundation’s Sunset Park digs for an artist talk and party to kick off the BHQFU Book Fair. Be sure to come back Saturday for more readings, activities, and goodies from vendors. Sunday, check out Foxy Production’s new Chatham Square digs. Save your energy, though, because you’ll want it for our party next week!

Read the full article →

This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Divine Interventions

by Paddy Johnson Paul Legault on March 10, 2015
Thumbnail image for This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Divine Interventions

It’s officially nice out. Get out and go out.

Read the full article →

New Museum Announces List of Artists in 2015 Triennial

by Corinna Kirsch on November 14, 2014
Thumbnail image for New Museum Announces List of Artists in 2015 Triennial

We’re providing you with a countdown clock so that you can plan out your February. The New Museum is going balls-out with this Triennial.

Read the full article →

Art at Its Best 2013: A Top Ten List

by Corinna Kirsch on December 23, 2013
Thumbnail image for Art at Its Best 2013: A Top Ten List

I’ve never been able to come up with a top ten list of exhibitions; big, lasting ideas don’t always take place in art on the wall. So, keep that in mind with my best-of list; there’re exhibitions, sure, but my main requirement was picking “art” that I keep coming back to time-and-time again.

Read the full article →

We Went to Chelsea: 27th Street

by The AFC Staff on January 23, 2013
Thumbnail image for We Went to Chelsea: 27th Street

Sascha Braunig (Foxy Production) gives us reason to wonder whether op art should be spooky or bizarre; Thomas Barrow (Derek Eller Gallery) makes confused sculptures; and Michael Waugh (Winkleman Gallery) falls out of a boat.

Read the full article →

27th Street Galleries Reopen, with Fanfare

by Corinna Kirsch on January 14, 2013
Thumbnail image for 27th Street Galleries Reopen, with Fanfare

On Saturday afternoon, the strip of galleries between the Hudson waterfront and 11th Avenue finally reopened with a block-wide opening reception. Those galleries have been closed since Hurricane Sandy hit in October. With months of repairs behind them, the galleries along 27th Street seem happy to sweep away those recent memories.

Read the full article →

Art Fag City at The L Magazine: Better Than Nothing

by Paddy Johnson on April 28, 2011
Thumbnail image for Art Fag City at The L Magazine: Better Than Nothing

This week at The L Magazine I discuss three Chelsea shows: Joseph Kosuth at Sean Kelly, Sascha Braunig at Foxy Production and Rochelle Feinstein at On Stellar Rays. A few words about Kosuth after the jump.

Read the full article →

New Reviews in Brief: First Chelsea, then the World

by Will Brand on April 19, 2011
Thumbnail image for New Reviews in Brief: First Chelsea, then the World

It’s tough finding time in an art critic’s busy schedule to criticize art, but we managed it this week. Our Reviews in Brief section is back with a vengeance, and we’ll be expanding it significantly over the next few months; too much goes unreported in this town, and we want to opine on the shows that fly under the radar just as much as the game-changers and train wrecks. For now, five shows we saw over the weekend in Chelsea.

Read the full article →