Posts tagged as:

Socrates Sculpture Park

This Week’s Must-See Events: Let’s See Frieze Best the 70-foot Bee Magnet

by Paddy Johnson on May 2, 2016
Thumbnail image for This Week’s Must-See Events: Let’s See Frieze Best the 70-foot Bee Magnet

This is not the week to let your inner researcher go crazy. It’s Frieze week, which means there’s a mountain of events, all of which will seem essential to visit. After spending the day combing through all the talks, the openings, and the fairs we have a little secret we can let you in on. Very little of what we’ve read about constitutes a “must-see” for the average artist. We’ve gone through and selected what we think is actually relevant to artists. That means there are no galas, no co-branding kick-off parties, and no invitation-only events we can’t attend anyway. What we do recommend is Meg Webster’s 70-foot bee magnet at Socrates Sculpture Center, a round table discussion on why artist-run galleries are the bomb, and a Chucky-like doll by Jordan Wolfson we’re pretty sure will scare the crap out of you. Brace yourself.

Read the full article →

Apply to Socrates Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition by Monday January 12th!

by Paddy Johnson on January 6, 2015
Thumbnail image for Apply to Socrates Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition by Monday January 12th!

Okay, so this is a really great opportunity for artists who make public sculptures and installations: Socrates Sculpture Park will award 15 artists $5,000 and a five month studio residency this winter.

Read the full article →

This Way to LIC! Dorsky Gallery Opens “Artists’ Walks” this Weekend

by Hannah Garner on September 5, 2013
Thumbnail image for This Way to LIC! Dorsky Gallery Opens “Artists’ Walks” this Weekend

When Richard Long said “a work of art can be a journey,” he meant it literally. In 1967 Long formed a line by walking back and forth along a stretch of grass. Toronto-based curator Earl Miller calls it the first artist’s walk, the subject of his exhibit at Dorsky Gallery in Long Island City. “Artists’ Walks: The Persistence of Peripateticism,” which opens on Sunday, exhibits the rejection of studio-based practice via the (recorded) wanderings of artists.

Read the full article →