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the whitney

Is Jeff Koons More Like Edward Snowden or Buzzfeed?

by Paddy Johnson on June 30, 2014
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Jeff Koons may inspire more debate than any other living artist. His work is kitschy, expensive, and market-friendly. He recycles imagery to the point of looking intellectually lazy. Is his factory of art makers really that different from Buzzfeed, a vast and wealthy website that brings together hundreds of pre-existing and manipulated images for little more than entertainment?

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This Week’s Must See Events: Is Gagosian Having an Identity Crisis?

by Paddy Johnson and Corinna Kirsch on March 10, 2014
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After the tide of art fairs and biennials last week, we get a lighter events listing this week. For those of you interested in luxury, there’s Gagosian’s exhibition of Chinese antiques—a strange choice for a contemporary art gallery. We’re going to William Powhida’s solo exhibition at Postmasters for a dose of art-as-criticism and checking out Smack Mellon’s open studios for a glimpse into what artists are working on outside of the galleries.

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Awful, Life-size Edward Hopper Diner Comes to the Flatiron

by Corinna Kirsch on September 18, 2013
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Call it public art, or a publicity stunt, but the Whitney has installed a life-size version of Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks in the Flatiron building’s prow.

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Art Fag City at The L Magazine: Wade Guyton And The “Imperfect Beauty” Cliché

by Paddy Johnson on December 6, 2012
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This week at The L Magazine I talk about the Wade Guyton show at The Whitney. As a few avid art readers may know, the show was anointed with great reviews by both Roberta Smith at The Times and Jerry Saltz at New York Magazine, each lauding Guyton for his innovation. I don’t agree with this idea at all, arguing in this piece, that work actually hews fairly closely to pre-existing conservative art world values. Also, even within the frame work of those values, the show’s just not very good. My thoughts on why, after the jump.

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AFC at the L Magazine: Decay on Display

by Paddy Johnson on July 18, 2012
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This week at The L Magazine, I review Yayoi Kusama’s solo show at the Whitney. It’s not all cupcakes and roses.

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Weekend Links: GoogaMooga and Other Hells

by Corinna Kirsch on May 21, 2012

  • A judge ruled California’s 35-year-old droit de suite law unconstitutional. [Reuters]
  • Christie’s post-war and contemporary evening sale in New York made  $388 million—but only 5% came from sales by female artists. [The Economist]
  • The Whitney Museum gets bigger. My bad, that’s just a shipping container. [Archinet]
  • The Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, in Kansas City, MO, isn’t doing too well. Its director resigned last week, after the resignation or elimination of at least four other employees. [The Kansas City Star]
  • Artnet gets interviewed by “The Street,” a finance blog, about its abilities to predict art market trends. Overall, Thomas Galbraith, director of analytics at artnet, doesn’t say much that would convince a millionaire to buy art.  “We examine particular collecting categories at the top-end then we break out those categories into its constituents,” said Galbraith. [The Street]
  • According to one study, Facebook users are vain. Another one says only the ones with thousands of friends are vain. The third one says Twitter users are the real vain ones. I predict the fourth one will vainly realize that beauty is in the eye of the Facebook shareholder. [The New York Times Well Blog]
  • By most accounts, the Great GoogaMooga was a disaster. The hating notably includes a few rants by The New York Times film critic A.O. Scott. [Eater]
  • In Chicago, the G8 Summit has caused several museums to close their doors for the entirety of the summit. They each cited security issues, though we’ve also heard that it’s because of private tours given to government officials. [Chicago G8]
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