Bravo’s New Reality Show “Work of Art” Defies Skeptics

by Art Fag City on April 8, 2010 · 121 comments Events

POST BY PADDY JOHNSON LEFT TO RIGHT: Dan Cutforth, (Executive Producer from Magical Elves), Sarah Jessica Parker, (Executive Producer from Pretty Matches and actress), China Chow, (Host and series judge), Simon de Pury, (Mentor, auctioneer), Bill Powers, (Series Judge, gallery owner), Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, (Series Judge, curator, gallery owner), Jerry Saltz, (Series Judge and art critic for NYMagazine)

Good news. Work of Art, Bravo’s new reality show debuting 11 p.m. (ET/PT) June 9, will not embarrass the art world. The series pits 14 artists in competition for $100,000 and a solo show at The Brooklyn Museum and if what I saw at yesterday’s press screening and premiere is any indication, the only obstacle in the show’s road to success is its time slot. The pilot is hilarious.

This is pretty much the selling point of Work of Art, as it doesn’t look much different from its predecessor, Project Runway, which left in 2008 for the Lifetime network. It’s not just that they’re using the same casting structure — 14 artists (trained and untrained), one host (Connoisseur China Chow), one mentor (auctioneer Simon de Pury), and three judges (art critic Jerry Saltz, Half Gallery owner Bill Powers and gallerist Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn) — but that the editing remains much the same.

Interviews with the artists reveal their thoughts on their competition, a secret twist to the challenges is introduced in the studios (in this case it was just the appearance of Sarah Jessica Parker), and a Project Runway-esque soundtrack backs the entire show. As expected Work of Art’s first episode introduces audiences to the artists and asks them to execute a challenge. In this case, the task was to create a portrait of one of their colleagues. This smacks of art school, and of course the work produced was about that level, but for one or two exceptions.

“I saw artists here who were better than were in the Whitney Biennial” Jerry Saltz proclaimed during the press question period. Of course, given the amount of crap that’s made it into the Biennial over the years, the statement mostly served as a slight to the Whitney.

Saltz’ comments came up when press started to ask if the show really would find the next great artist. Based on what I’ve seen thus far, the answer to that question is a resounding no. An abstract expressionist clown painting on a palette as a portrait broke just about every good art making rule in the book, but it was still arguably topped by one artist’s absurd and hilarious claim during the critique, “I’m not responsible for your experience of my work.” No rebuttal to that assertion was shown though I assume there must have been one.

Notably, comments such as this are entertaining enough to suggest that actually finding the next great artist won’t be critical to the show’s success. Indeed, all it needs to do is produce the next famous one. Given the depth of personality on this show, that shouldn’t be too hard.

{ 115 comments… read them below or add one }

Rachael April 8, 2010 at 4:07 pm

I’ll be begging my friends with cable to watch on their tv’s. Can’t wait for this!

Reply

lacoste polo shirt April 22, 2011 at 8:51 am

I can attest that she’s a brilliant and well-known performance and video artist.

Reply

Rachael April 8, 2010 at 12:07 pm

I’ll be begging my friends with cable to watch on their tv’s. Can’t wait for this!

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Museum Nerd April 8, 2010 at 4:11 pm

This is really going to be fascinating. Maybe I should get cable television. I wonder if it will actually capture the attention of the nation.

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Museum Nerd April 8, 2010 at 12:11 pm

This is really going to be fascinating. Maybe I should get cable television. I wonder if it will actually capture the attention of the nation.

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Jim VanKirk April 8, 2010 at 5:24 pm

“…a solo show at The Brooklyn Museum.” Where the fuck do these judges get the credentials to chose exhibitors at the Brooklyn Museum?

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Beanie April 8, 2010 at 5:24 pm

That would be fun to watch but seems like the majority of people who would watch a bunch of artists are the kind of people who don’t have cable. Lol. Guess I need to ask a friend to let me watch at their place. :0)

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Jim VanKirk April 8, 2010 at 1:24 pm

“…a solo show at The Brooklyn Museum.” Where the fuck do these judges get the credentials to chose exhibitors at the Brooklyn Museum?

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Beanie April 8, 2010 at 1:24 pm

That would be fun to watch but seems like the majority of people who would watch a bunch of artists are the kind of people who don’t have cable. Lol. Guess I need to ask a friend to let me watch at their place. :0)

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man April 8, 2010 at 5:34 pm

Cable? I don’t even have a television player!

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man April 8, 2010 at 1:34 pm

Cable? I don’t even have a television player!

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Mark Billy April 8, 2010 at 5:57 pm

Artists have totally lost control or maybe they never had it at all. But in saying that I am definitely going to check this show out. If not just to see Jerry tear into these artists.

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Mark Billy April 8, 2010 at 1:57 pm

Artists have totally lost control or maybe they never had it at all. But in saying that I am definitely going to check this show out. If not just to see Jerry tear into these artists.

Reply

Jill Conner April 8, 2010 at 6:28 pm

Why won’t this embarrass the art world?

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Jill Conner April 8, 2010 at 2:28 pm

Why won’t this embarrass the art world?

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IAin'tGotNoStinkin'tv April 8, 2010 at 6:43 pm

I also don’t have a tv. Would be nice if Bravo would make it available on their website. Sounds like it’s gonna be fun.

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IAin'tGotNoStinkin'tv April 8, 2010 at 2:43 pm

I also don’t have a tv. Would be nice if Bravo would make it available on their website. Sounds like it’s gonna be fun.

Reply

Mike @ MAO April 8, 2010 at 7:38 pm

Paddy.. Thanks.. but you really should have posted this on April 1st!!

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Mike @ MAO April 8, 2010 at 3:38 pm

Paddy.. Thanks.. but you really should have posted this on April 1st!!

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encolere April 8, 2010 at 7:58 pm

Download it, people. There’s no need to get cable just for one show.

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encolere April 8, 2010 at 3:58 pm

Download it, people. There’s no need to get cable just for one show.

Reply

Mead McLean April 8, 2010 at 9:54 pm

I’m waiting for the challenge in episode 6: “Make something that doesn’t suck.”

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Mead McLean April 8, 2010 at 5:54 pm

I’m waiting for the challenge in episode 6: “Make something that doesn’t suck.”

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Nathalie Chikhi April 8, 2010 at 10:44 pm

can’t wait to see it_Some fashion designer were really good like Leanne Marshall_http://www.leanimal.com/#/home

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Nathalie Chikhi April 8, 2010 at 6:44 pm

can’t wait to see it_Some fashion designer were really good like Leanne Marshall_http://www.leanimal.com/#/home

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Justin Simoni April 9, 2010 at 12:49 am

I’d rather see what my friends are up to with their art.

So… this show is useless to me.

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Justin Simoni April 8, 2010 at 8:49 pm

I’d rather see what my friends are up to with their art.

So… this show is useless to me.

Reply

dingle April 9, 2010 at 1:24 am

haha i like how this article refers to “blogger Jerry Saltz”.

http://www.observer.com/2010/culture/can-bravo-reality-show-convince-people-iowa-art-world-also-for-them

hey that kid abdi you pictured back in july made it onto the show.

Reply

dingle April 8, 2010 at 9:24 pm

haha i like how this article refers to “blogger Jerry Saltz”.

http://www.observer.com/2010/culture/can-bravo-reality-show-convince-people-iowa-art-world-also-for-them

hey that kid abdi you pictured back in july made it onto the show.

Reply

David April 9, 2010 at 1:43 am

The artist who you (incorrectly) quoted as stating “I’m not responsible for your experience of my work” is Nao Bustamante. As a former California resident, I can attest that she’s a brilliant and well-known performance and video artist.

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David April 8, 2010 at 9:43 pm

The artist who you (incorrectly) quoted as stating “I’m not responsible for your experience of my work” is Nao Bustamante. As a former California resident, I can attest that she’s a brilliant and well-known performance and video artist.

Reply

Heather Holden April 9, 2010 at 3:16 am

The borough of Brooklyn should be embarrassed that it is giving it’s museum such insufficient support that enough that it has to sink to this level of non-art activity.

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Heather Holden April 8, 2010 at 11:16 pm

The borough of Brooklyn should be embarrassed that it is giving it’s museum such insufficient support that enough that it has to sink to this level of non-art activity.

Reply

Art Fag City April 9, 2010 at 3:13 pm

Hi David,

Apologies if I’ve misquoted Nao Bustamante, but the assessment remains the same. It’s absurd for an artist to claim no responsibility for a viewer’s experience of the work, particularly when the challenge was to create a portrait.

Bustamante’s professional work as performance artist doesn’t necessarily make her a good competitor.

Out of curiosity, what is your relationship to the show and the artist?

Reply

Art Fag City April 9, 2010 at 3:13 pm

Hi David,

Apologies if I’ve misquoted Nao Bustamante, but the assessment remains the same. It’s absurd for an artist to claim no responsibility for a viewer’s experience of the work, particularly when the challenge was to create a portrait.

Bustamante’s professional work as performance artist doesn’t necessarily make her a good competitor.

Out of curiosity, what is your relationship to the show and the artist?

Reply

Art Fag City April 9, 2010 at 11:13 am

Hi David,

Apologies if I’ve misquoted Nao Bustamante, but the assessment remains the same. It’s absurd for an artist to claim no responsibility for a viewer’s experience of the work, particularly when the challenge was to create a portrait.

Bustamante’s professional work as performance artist doesn’t necessarily make her a good competitor.

Out of curiosity, what is your relationship to the show and the artist?

Reply

reo April 10, 2010 at 7:52 pm

Editor’s note: This comment has been edited for trolling.

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reo April 10, 2010 at 7:52 pm

Editor’s note: This comment has been edited for trolling.

Reply

reo April 10, 2010 at 7:52 pm

Editor’s note: This comment has been edited for trolling.

Reply

reo April 10, 2010 at 7:52 pm

Editor’s note: This comment has been edited for trolling.

Reply

reo April 10, 2010 at 3:52 pm

Editor’s note: This comment has been edited for trolling.

Reply

Art Fag City April 10, 2010 at 8:05 pm

Please keep in mind that comments suggesting the author of this post maintains lower standards than regular publications, or needs to crack open a book will not be approved. Got a comment you want approved? Stay on topic. Don’t be an asshole.

Reply

Art Fag City April 10, 2010 at 8:05 pm

Please keep in mind that comments suggesting the author of this post maintains lower standards than regular publications, or needs to crack open a book will not be approved. Got a comment you want approved? Stay on topic. Don’t be an asshole.

Reply

Art Fag City April 10, 2010 at 8:05 pm

Please keep in mind that comments suggesting the author of this post maintains lower standards than regular publications, or needs to crack open a book will not be approved. Got a comment you want approved? Stay on topic. Don’t be an asshole.

Reply

Art Fag City April 10, 2010 at 4:05 pm

Please keep in mind that comments suggesting the author of this post maintains lower standards than regular publications, or needs to crack open a book will not be approved. Got a comment you want approved? Stay on topic. Don’t be an asshole.

Reply

Vesper April 10, 2010 at 9:03 pm

I don’t know whether to be mad, glad or sad about this. The art world is waaaaay too uppity (my husband is a professional in the industry), and art somewhere along the line has gotten so elite that maybe it’s good to make a reality show about it to show what a mockery it can be. Maybe it’s time for some good ol’ art-for-the-masses.nnOn the other hand, what makes art “real” or “good” is a debate that is in some ways subjective, in some ways completely self-referential. BUT, like someone above said, a lot of what is in the Whitney Biennial *is* crap, and the whole mystique surrounding the “fine” art world has build a kingdom around itself in which the emperor has no clothes.nnBut judging from what I see in a lot of galleries these days, maybe even that would be considered “art”. Whatever.

Reply

Vesper April 10, 2010 at 9:03 pm

I don’t know whether to be mad, glad or sad about this. The art world is waaaaay too uppity (my husband is a professional in the industry), and art somewhere along the line has gotten so elite that maybe it’s good to make a reality show about it to show what a mockery it can be. Maybe it’s time for some good ol’ art-for-the-masses.nnOn the other hand, what makes art “real” or “good” is a debate that is in some ways subjective, in some ways completely self-referential. BUT, like someone above said, a lot of what is in the Whitney Biennial *is* crap, and the whole mystique surrounding the “fine” art world has build a kingdom around itself in which the emperor has no clothes.nnBut judging from what I see in a lot of galleries these days, maybe even that would be considered “art”. Whatever.

Reply

Vesper April 10, 2010 at 9:03 pm

I don’t know whether to be mad, glad or sad about this. The art world is waaaaay too uppity (my husband is a professional in the industry), and art somewhere along the line has gotten so elite that maybe it’s good to make a reality show about it to show what a mockery it can be. Maybe it’s time for some good ol’ art-for-the-masses.nnOn the other hand, what makes art “real” or “good” is a debate that is in some ways subjective, in some ways completely self-referential. BUT, like someone above said, a lot of what is in the Whitney Biennial *is* crap, and the whole mystique surrounding the “fine” art world has build a kingdom around itself in which the emperor has no clothes.nnBut judging from what I see in a lot of galleries these days, maybe even that would be considered “art”. Whatever.

Reply

Vesper April 10, 2010 at 9:03 pm

I don’t know whether to be mad, glad or sad about this. The art world is waaaaay too uppity (my husband is a professional in the industry), and art somewhere along the line has gotten so elite that maybe it’s good to make a reality show about it to show what a mockery it can be. Maybe it’s time for some good ol’ art-for-the-masses.nnOn the other hand, what makes art “real” or “good” is a debate that is in some ways subjective, in some ways completely self-referential. BUT, like someone above said, a lot of what is in the Whitney Biennial *is* crap, and the whole mystique surrounding the “fine” art world has build a kingdom around itself in which the emperor has no clothes.nnBut judging from what I see in a lot of galleries these days, maybe even that would be considered “art”. Whatever.

Reply

Vesper April 10, 2010 at 5:03 pm

I don’t know whether to be mad, glad or sad about this. The art world is waaaaay too uppity (my husband is a professional in the industry), and art somewhere along the line has gotten so elite that maybe it’s good to make a reality show about it to show what a mockery it can be. Maybe it’s time for some good ol’ art-for-the-masses.\n\nOn the other hand, what makes art “real” or “good” is a debate that is in some ways subjective, in some ways completely self-referential. BUT, like someone above said, a lot of what is in the Whitney Biennial *is* crap, and the whole mystique surrounding the “fine” art world has build a kingdom around itself in which the emperor has no clothes.\n\nBut judging from what I see in a lot of galleries these days, maybe even that would be considered “art”. Whatever.

Reply

Luca Rossi April 11, 2010 at 12:02 pm

Ohoh, also in italy we need of this fluid Art attitude…here too money in unable events…

Reply

Luca Rossi April 11, 2010 at 12:02 pm

Ohoh, also in italy we need of this fluid Art attitude…here too money in unable events…

Reply

Luca Rossi April 11, 2010 at 12:02 pm

Ohoh, also in italy we need of this fluid Art attitude…here too money in unable events…

Reply

Luca Rossi April 11, 2010 at 8:02 am

Ohoh, also in italy we need of this fluid Art attitude…here too money in unable events…

Reply

jpapare April 12, 2010 at 6:45 pm

Art used to be a calling. Now people call it a career. The objective of young art students is to become important. At its foundation, all of this has nothing to do with art. People involved in careers surrounding the making of art: writing, curatorship, and dealing, supported by art investors (very few buyers are collectors), have been selling the “art world” idea, and lots of career artists have been buying it. The so-called art world is a rotten apple which contains a small core of integrity and sincerity. Fine art is not for anyone, anymore than are Camus, Shakespeare, and Bach. I anticipate a really dumb show in which the uninformed are going to abuse the uninitiated. The premise encourages judgement without education. This is the wrong message being endorsed here.

Reply

jpapare April 12, 2010 at 2:45 pm

Art used to be a calling. Now people call it a career. The objective of young art students is to become important. At its foundation, all of this has nothing to do with art. People involved in careers surrounding the making of art: writing, curatorship, and dealing, supported by art investors (very few buyers are collectors), have been selling the “art world” idea, and lots of career artists have been buying it. The so-called art world is a rotten apple which contains a small core of integrity and sincerity. Fine art is not for anyone, anymore than are Camus, Shakespeare, and Bach. I anticipate a really dumb show in which the uninformed are going to abuse the uninitiated. The premise encourages judgement without education. This is the wrong message being endorsed here.

Reply

Lisa Golightly April 14, 2010 at 5:27 am

CAN NOT WAIT

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Lisa Golightly April 14, 2010 at 5:27 am

CAN NOT WAIT

Reply

Lisa Golightly April 14, 2010 at 1:27 am

CAN NOT WAIT

Reply

David April 14, 2010 at 11:00 pm

It’s interesting to me that none of the judges are ‘working’ artists. They’re all obviously accomplished (except the China Chow person, it seems…), but I work for and spend lots of unhappy waking hours with dealers, as well as a private collector, and these are often the last people who should be giving advice to developing artists. As the above say, art should never be looked at as a career – the money aspect coming only out of necessity, and fame being only incidental and delivered based on significance. Dealers, auctioneers, collectors and the like are *often* only out for what’s new and hip, what will excite people because of its differentness – not necessarily its poignancy or revelations about the human condition and stuff. They (the generalizing, consumptive they) look at what will be most likely to sell high, what will be attractive to major curators and what will gain cash value – which is only sometimes directly connected to cultural significance. This could have been an opportunity for academics and matured artists to provide a thorough, rapid creative immersion in the creative process while bringing these (many of them) young, inexperienced artists into the reality of the ‘art world.’ What I’m afraid will happen is this process will confuse these impressionable – and clearly self-promotion-driven – artists as to what “success” for an artist means.

Reply

David April 14, 2010 at 7:00 pm

It’s interesting to me that none of the judges are ‘working’ artists. They’re all obviously accomplished (except the China Chow person, it seems…), but I work for and spend lots of unhappy waking hours with dealers, as well as a private collector, and these are often the last people who should be giving advice to developing artists. As the above say, art should never be looked at as a career – the money aspect coming only out of necessity, and fame being only incidental and delivered based on significance. Dealers, auctioneers, collectors and the like are *often* only out for what’s new and hip, what will excite people because of its differentness – not necessarily its poignancy or revelations about the human condition and stuff. They (the generalizing, consumptive they) look at what will be most likely to sell high, what will be attractive to major curators and what will gain cash value – which is only sometimes directly connected to cultural significance. This could have been an opportunity for academics and matured artists to provide a thorough, rapid creative immersion in the creative process while bringing these (many of them) young, inexperienced artists into the reality of the ‘art world.’ What I’m afraid will happen is this process will confuse these impressionable – and clearly self-promotion-driven – artists as to what “success” for an artist means.

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 6:45 am

David,

Good post!

It was only a matter of time until something like this came about. I’m interested to watch the freak show unfold, purely as spectacle, but I expect little substance to come out of this show. A 2 year long MFA degree where people are pushed to develop and judged with a stamp of approval at the end is already a some what absurdly controlled and synthetic situation, but the structure of the show (and the people chosen to judge and mentor) is just ludicrous… All people will specific agendas and ideologies.

Knowing one of the contestants (without naming names) I find it completely ludicrous yet fitting that he made it onto the show, and the mere fact that he is on it shows at the show is completely about the clashing of different personalities, and not about anything of substance being really produced. But isn’t that what “reality” TV is all about? If they producers took the drama away, and chose people completely based on ability and intellect, viewers may be forced to actually think rather than dial in and switch off… but we couldn’t have that, because we live in a society where images are meant to be glanced at, signs and symbols are suppose to be read quickly and drama is used to get the heart racing.

As for the comments about the show toppling the “art worlds” ivory tower… the cheapening effect the show will have will do nothing to resist the elitism in the art world as it’s more likely to the importance of “personalities” and the idea of “the top artist” which are some of the precise elements that help build hierarchical structures found in the art world – “They’ve” just found another easy and cheap way to do it!

I suppose some people actually believe that having standards, and difficult to understand ideas, in art = elitism!

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 6:45 am

David,

Good post!

It was only a matter of time until something like this came about. I’m interested to watch the freak show unfold, purely as spectacle, but I expect little substance to come out of this show. A 2 year long MFA degree where people are pushed to develop and judged with a stamp of approval at the end is already a some what absurdly controlled and synthetic situation, but the structure of the show (and the people chosen to judge and mentor) is just ludicrous… All people will specific agendas and ideologies.

Knowing one of the contestants (without naming names) I find it completely ludicrous yet fitting that he made it onto the show, and the mere fact that he is on it shows at the show is completely about the clashing of different personalities, and not about anything of substance being really produced. But isn’t that what “reality” TV is all about? If they producers took the drama away, and chose people completely based on ability and intellect, viewers may be forced to actually think rather than dial in and switch off… but we couldn’t have that, because we live in a society where images are meant to be glanced at, signs and symbols are suppose to be read quickly and drama is used to get the heart racing.

As for the comments about the show toppling the “art worlds” ivory tower… the cheapening effect the show will have will do nothing to resist the elitism in the art world as it’s more likely to the importance of “personalities” and the idea of “the top artist” which are some of the precise elements that help build hierarchical structures found in the art world – “They’ve” just found another easy and cheap way to do it!

I suppose some people actually believe that having standards, and difficult to understand ideas, in art = elitism!

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 6:45 am

David,

Good post!

It was only a matter of time until something like this came about. I’m interested to watch the freak show unfold, purely as spectacle, but I expect little substance to come out of this show. A 2 year long MFA degree where people are pushed to develop and judged with a stamp of approval at the end is already a some what absurdly controlled and synthetic situation, but the structure of the show (and the people chosen to judge and mentor) is just ludicrous… All people will specific agendas and ideologies.

Knowing one of the contestants (without naming names) I find it completely ludicrous yet fitting that he made it onto the show, and the mere fact that he is on it shows at the show is completely about the clashing of different personalities, and not about anything of substance being really produced. But isn’t that what “reality” TV is all about? If they producers took the drama away, and chose people completely based on ability and intellect, viewers may be forced to actually think rather than dial in and switch off… but we couldn’t have that, because we live in a society where images are meant to be glanced at, signs and symbols are suppose to be read quickly and drama is used to get the heart racing.

As for the comments about the show toppling the “art worlds” ivory tower… the cheapening effect the show will have will do nothing to resist the elitism in the art world as it’s more likely to the importance of “personalities” and the idea of “the top artist” which are some of the precise elements that help build hierarchical structures found in the art world – “They’ve” just found another easy and cheap way to do it!

I suppose some people actually believe that having standards, and difficult to understand ideas, in art = elitism!

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 6:45 am

David,

Good post!

It was only a matter of time until something like this came about. I’m interested to watch the freak show unfold, purely as spectacle, but I expect little substance to come out of this show. A 2 year long MFA degree where people are pushed to develop and judged with a stamp of approval at the end is already a some what absurdly controlled and synthetic situation, but the structure of the show (and the people chosen to judge and mentor) is just ludicrous… All people will specific agendas and ideologies.

Knowing one of the contestants (without naming names) I find it completely ludicrous yet fitting that he made it onto the show, and the mere fact that he is on it shows at the show is completely about the clashing of different personalities, and not about anything of substance being really produced. But isn’t that what “reality” TV is all about? If they producers took the drama away, and chose people completely based on ability and intellect, viewers may be forced to actually think rather than dial in and switch off… but we couldn’t have that, because we live in a society where images are meant to be glanced at, signs and symbols are suppose to be read quickly and drama is used to get the heart racing.

As for the comments about the show toppling the “art worlds” ivory tower… the cheapening effect the show will have will do nothing to resist the elitism in the art world as it’s more likely to the importance of “personalities” and the idea of “the top artist” which are some of the precise elements that help build hierarchical structures found in the art world – “They’ve” just found another easy and cheap way to do it!

I suppose some people actually believe that having standards, and difficult to understand ideas, in art = elitism!

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 2:45 am

David,

Good post!

It was only a matter of time until something like this came about. I’m interested to watch the freak show unfold, purely as spectacle, but I expect little substance to come out of this show. A 2 year long MFA degree where people are pushed to develop and judged with a stamp of approval at the end is already a some what absurdly controlled and synthetic situation, but the structure of the show (and the people chosen to judge and mentor) is just ludicrous… All people will specific agendas and ideologies.

Knowing one of the contestants (without naming names) I find it completely ludicrous yet fitting that he made it onto the show, and the mere fact that he is on it shows at the show is completely about the clashing of different personalities, and not about anything of substance being really produced. But isn’t that what “reality” TV is all about? If they producers took the drama away, and chose people completely based on ability and intellect, viewers may be forced to actually think rather than dial in and switch off… but we couldn’t have that, because we live in a society where images are meant to be glanced at, signs and symbols are suppose to be read quickly and drama is used to get the heart racing.

As for the comments about the show toppling the “art worlds” ivory tower… the cheapening effect the show will have will do nothing to resist the elitism in the art world as it’s more likely to the importance of “personalities” and the idea of “the top artist” which are some of the precise elements that help build hierarchical structures found in the art world – “They’ve” just found another easy and cheap way to do it!

I suppose some people actually believe that having standards, and difficult to understand ideas, in art = elitism!

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 6:57 am

The show should be renamed “The Promise of Celebrity”.

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 6:57 am

The show should be renamed “The Promise of Celebrity”.

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 6:57 am

The show should be renamed “The Promise of Celebrity”.

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 6:57 am

The show should be renamed “The Promise of Celebrity”.

Reply

chitown April 25, 2010 at 2:57 am

The show should be renamed “The Promise of Celebrity”.

Reply

Dain Gore April 25, 2010 at 10:13 am

I can scarcely contain my anticipation! I must say that the net gain can only be a huge plus, as it was with both Top Chef and Project Runway (Launch My Line…not so much).

The exposure to what goes on in the Art World (yes, even with cameras everywhere and clever editing) will result in entertainment for the masses and vicarious vindication for artists who work in their respective mediums…brand new armchair art critics will be born!

Although I look forward to seeing what the artists this season can come up with and are challenged by, I know of many good candidates for the next season(s) over in my city and that excites me to no end!

And I can’t wait to see Jerry Saltz tell it like it is.

Reply

Dain Gore April 25, 2010 at 10:13 am

I can scarcely contain my anticipation! I must say that the net gain can only be a huge plus, as it was with both Top Chef and Project Runway (Launch My Line…not so much).

The exposure to what goes on in the Art World (yes, even with cameras everywhere and clever editing) will result in entertainment for the masses and vicarious vindication for artists who work in their respective mediums…brand new armchair art critics will be born!

Although I look forward to seeing what the artists this season can come up with and are challenged by, I know of many good candidates for the next season(s) over in my city and that excites me to no end!

And I can’t wait to see Jerry Saltz tell it like it is.

Reply

Dain Gore April 25, 2010 at 10:13 am

I can scarcely contain my anticipation! I must say that the net gain can only be a huge plus, as it was with both Top Chef and Project Runway (Launch My Line…not so much).

The exposure to what goes on in the Art World (yes, even with cameras everywhere and clever editing) will result in entertainment for the masses and vicarious vindication for artists who work in their respective mediums…brand new armchair art critics will be born!

Although I look forward to seeing what the artists this season can come up with and are challenged by, I know of many good candidates for the next season(s) over in my city and that excites me to no end!

And I can’t wait to see Jerry Saltz tell it like it is.

Reply

Dain Gore April 25, 2010 at 10:13 am

I can scarcely contain my anticipation! I must say that the net gain can only be a huge plus, as it was with both Top Chef and Project Runway (Launch My Line…not so much).

The exposure to what goes on in the Art World (yes, even with cameras everywhere and clever editing) will result in entertainment for the masses and vicarious vindication for artists who work in their respective mediums…brand new armchair art critics will be born!

Although I look forward to seeing what the artists this season can come up with and are challenged by, I know of many good candidates for the next season(s) over in my city and that excites me to no end!

And I can’t wait to see Jerry Saltz tell it like it is.

Reply

Dain Gore April 25, 2010 at 6:13 am

I can scarcely contain my anticipation! I must say that the net gain can only be a huge plus, as it was with both Top Chef and Project Runway (Launch My Line…not so much).

The exposure to what goes on in the Art World (yes, even with cameras everywhere and clever editing) will result in entertainment for the masses and vicarious vindication for artists who work in their respective mediums…brand new armchair art critics will be born!

Although I look forward to seeing what the artists this season can come up with and are challenged by, I know of many good candidates for the next season(s) over in my city and that excites me to no end!

And I can’t wait to see Jerry Saltz tell it like it is.

Reply

Vagrant May 21, 2010 at 11:55 am

There is no such thing as a real “reality show”. In there own way they are scripted as much or more than the rest of television entertainment. I am looking forward to the art and watching and listening to the process. It can not be any worse than what is on network TV.

Reply

Vagrant May 21, 2010 at 11:55 am

There is no such thing as a real “reality show”. In there own way they are scripted as much or more than the rest of television entertainment. I am looking forward to the art and watching and listening to the process. It can not be any worse than what is on network TV.

Reply

Vagrant May 21, 2010 at 11:55 am

There is no such thing as a real “reality show”. In there own way they are scripted as much or more than the rest of television entertainment. I am looking forward to the art and watching and listening to the process. It can not be any worse than what is on network TV.

Reply

Vagrant May 21, 2010 at 11:55 am

There is no such thing as a real “reality show”. In there own way they are scripted as much or more than the rest of television entertainment. I am looking forward to the art and watching and listening to the process. It can not be any worse than what is on network TV.

Reply

Vagrant May 21, 2010 at 7:55 am

There is no such thing as a real “reality show”. In there own way they are scripted as much or more than the rest of television entertainment. I am looking forward to the art and watching and listening to the process. It can not be any worse than what is on network TV.

Reply

Scott Hill June 5, 2010 at 7:13 pm

My congrats to mr. Duchamp. I took almost a decade but you have finally driven them all mad.

Reply

Scott Hill June 5, 2010 at 7:13 pm

My congrats to mr. Duchamp. I took almost a decade but you have finally driven them all mad.

Reply

Scott Hill June 5, 2010 at 3:13 pm

My congrats to mr. Duchamp. I took almost a decade but you have finally driven them all mad.

Reply

Suzy Woodburn June 7, 2010 at 8:38 pm

How are you able to apply for this show?

Reply

Suzy Woodburn June 7, 2010 at 4:38 pm

How are you able to apply for this show?

Reply

Alex June 8, 2010 at 1:44 am

For an artist to say that they are not responsible for the viewer’s experience of their work is completely legitimate. This has been commonly discussed in the art world for some time. An artist creates something and releases it into the world. Others might bring a completely different interpretation to the work than the artist intended, yet that interpretation is still considered valid. Problems will arise when the “wrong” interpretation is placed on a work – a classic example of this being Nirvana’s “Rape Me” being interpreted as an encouragement of rape. Was Nirvana responsible for that interpretation? Not really. They were definitely not happy about it, but they also did not rewrite or withdraw the song (nor should they have).

Reply

Alex June 8, 2010 at 1:44 am

For an artist to say that they are not responsible for the viewer’s experience of their work is completely legitimate. This has been commonly discussed in the art world for some time. An artist creates something and releases it into the world. Others might bring a completely different interpretation to the work than the artist intended, yet that interpretation is still considered valid. Problems will arise when the “wrong” interpretation is placed on a work – a classic example of this being Nirvana’s “Rape Me” being interpreted as an encouragement of rape. Was Nirvana responsible for that interpretation? Not really. They were definitely not happy about it, but they also did not rewrite or withdraw the song (nor should they have).

Reply

Alex June 8, 2010 at 1:44 am

For an artist to say that they are not responsible for the viewer’s experience of their work is completely legitimate. This has been commonly discussed in the art world for some time. An artist creates something and releases it into the world. Others might bring a completely different interpretation to the work than the artist intended, yet that interpretation is still considered valid. Problems will arise when the “wrong” interpretation is placed on a work – a classic example of this being Nirvana’s “Rape Me” being interpreted as an encouragement of rape. Was Nirvana responsible for that interpretation? Not really. They were definitely not happy about it, but they also did not rewrite or withdraw the song (nor should they have).

Reply

Alex June 7, 2010 at 9:44 pm

For an artist to say that they are not responsible for the viewer’s experience of their work is completely legitimate. This has been commonly discussed in the art world for some time. An artist creates something and releases it into the world. Others might bring a completely different interpretation to the work than the artist intended, yet that interpretation is still considered valid. Problems will arise when the “wrong” interpretation is placed on a work – a classic example of this being Nirvana’s “Rape Me” being interpreted as an encouragement of rape. Was Nirvana responsible for that interpretation? Not really. They were definitely not happy about it, but they also did not rewrite or withdraw the song (nor should they have).

Reply

Art Fag City June 8, 2010 at 1:54 am

I see your point, but if you make a piece so uninterpretable that no one gets it, and your position is so what? That’s not my fault, I think that’s a problem.

Reply

Art Fag City June 7, 2010 at 9:54 pm

I see your point, but if you make a piece so uninterpretable that no one gets it, and your position is so what? That’s not my fault, I think that’s a problem.

Reply

anna June 9, 2010 at 10:34 pm

A gallery or a bar or something should REALLY screen this in NYC. I know tons of people who are excited about this (either seriously or ironically) and NONE of them have cable. And that is why, even if it is a decent show, it will fail.

Reply

anna June 9, 2010 at 10:34 pm

A gallery or a bar or something should REALLY screen this in NYC. I know tons of people who are excited about this (either seriously or ironically) and NONE of them have cable. And that is why, even if it is a decent show, it will fail.

Reply

anna June 9, 2010 at 10:34 pm

A gallery or a bar or something should REALLY screen this in NYC. I know tons of people who are excited about this (either seriously or ironically) and NONE of them have cable. And that is why, even if it is a decent show, it will fail.

Reply

anna June 9, 2010 at 6:34 pm

A gallery or a bar or something should REALLY screen this in NYC. I know tons of people who are excited about this (either seriously or ironically) and NONE of them have cable. And that is why, even if it is a decent show, it will fail.

Reply

Evo Love June 10, 2010 at 4:33 am

I just watched the show, I think they should have judged it differently. And the judges don’t seem so kosher… Someone should have formatted the show the same way you apply for a art grant… Not like a cooking contest… What’s a abstract sculpture artist suppose to do if they don’t paint or define lines? They will be sent home because they don’t paint or draw… I don’t know about this show…

Reply

Evo Love June 10, 2010 at 4:33 am

I just watched the show, I think they should have judged it differently. And the judges don’t seem so kosher… Someone should have formatted the show the same way you apply for a art grant… Not like a cooking contest… What’s a abstract sculpture artist suppose to do if they don’t paint or define lines? They will be sent home because they don’t paint or draw… I don’t know about this show…

Reply

Evo Love June 10, 2010 at 4:33 am

I just watched the show, I think they should have judged it differently. And the judges don’t seem so kosher… Someone should have formatted the show the same way you apply for a art grant… Not like a cooking contest… What’s a abstract sculpture artist suppose to do if they don’t paint or define lines? They will be sent home because they don’t paint or draw… I don’t know about this show…

Reply

Evo Love June 10, 2010 at 12:33 am

I just watched the show, I think they should have judged it differently. And the judges don’t seem so kosher… Someone should have formatted the show the same way you apply for a art grant… Not like a cooking contest… What’s a abstract sculpture artist suppose to do if they don’t paint or define lines? They will be sent home because they don’t paint or draw… I don’t know about this show…

Reply

Capt Flash June 10, 2010 at 9:25 pm

Betcha’ Vinnie Van Gogh wouldn’t make the cut.

I don’t got cable and was busy painting anyway.

Too bad I missed it

Reply

Capt Flash June 10, 2010 at 9:25 pm

Betcha’ Vinnie Van Gogh wouldn’t make the cut.

I don’t got cable and was busy painting anyway.

Too bad I missed it

Reply

Capt Flash June 10, 2010 at 9:25 pm

Betcha’ Vinnie Van Gogh wouldn’t make the cut.

I don’t got cable and was busy painting anyway.

Too bad I missed it

Reply

Capt Flash June 10, 2010 at 5:25 pm

Betcha’ Vinnie Van Gogh wouldn’t make the cut.

I don’t got cable and was busy painting anyway.

Too bad I missed it

Reply

Rita June 12, 2010 at 2:06 pm

One word, people: Torrent.

Reply

Rita June 12, 2010 at 2:06 pm

One word, people: Torrent.

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Rita June 12, 2010 at 2:06 pm

One word, people: Torrent.

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Rita June 12, 2010 at 10:06 am

One word, people: Torrent.

Reply

Dan June 21, 2010 at 5:51 am

I was at the NY casting and enjoyed it for the “I’m in line for something” experience. Watching the premiere show was fun. Poor guy that did the clown painting is a bigger patsy that Oswald. Not sure about China Chow…

Oh, I too have skipped cable installation, but people c’mon? It’s called Hulu.com and you can watch it at the library on their computers if you’re sooooooo artsy you don’t even own a computer.

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Dan June 21, 2010 at 1:51 am

I was at the NY casting and enjoyed it for the “I’m in line for something” experience. Watching the premiere show was fun. Poor guy that did the clown painting is a bigger patsy that Oswald. Not sure about China Chow…

Oh, I too have skipped cable installation, but people c’mon? It’s called Hulu.com and you can watch it at the library on their computers if you’re sooooooo artsy you don’t even own a computer.

Reply

T DeMarco July 24, 2010 at 12:40 am

…..I kept giving it a chance, week after week, but I just cant watch it any more!! This show is nauseating……but last night when China Chow came out in the ugliest, tackiest dress I have ever seen and she is one of the judges? I’m done…it is a dumb, talentless show.

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T DeMarco July 24, 2010 at 12:40 am

…..I kept giving it a chance, week after week, but I just cant watch it any more!! This show is nauseating……but last night when China Chow came out in the ugliest, tackiest dress I have ever seen and she is one of the judges? I’m done…it is a dumb, talentless show.

Reply

T DeMarco July 24, 2010 at 12:40 am

…..I kept giving it a chance, week after week, but I just cant watch it any more!! This show is nauseating……but last night when China Chow came out in the ugliest, tackiest dress I have ever seen and she is one of the judges? I’m done…it is a dumb, talentless show.

Reply

T DeMarco July 23, 2010 at 8:40 pm

…..I kept giving it a chance, week after week, but I just cant watch it any more!! This show is nauseating……but last night when China Chow came out in the ugliest, tackiest dress I have ever seen and she is one of the judges? I’m done…it is a dumb, talentless show.

Reply

Rosalee1967 December 10, 2011 at 2:48 pm

lola is a player. lola should be disqualified. Its ok because what goes around comes around.i just watched the street art episode where they had the tag episode. she has no business being on the show. when you have to write on street wall art whats the point. ?  that is not the worst she trys to sabatash others . putting a penis on other art not hers before the judges see the art. cigerettes on the art. she is also playing the super nice to the judges and when some of the girls ask a question such as when are you gona be done with that machine, they just ignored her. oh im such your street art looked like cat in the hat with dicks. and if your gona write all over it, at least it could be neat.  you write very messy. you look like you could give a shit.  pass in line in my line and see what happens.    maybe you should think of others, you prob could of gone far.  i have feeling your next. or they are keeping you to make fool out of you.  your welcome rose.

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