The Art Fag City Art Sneaker Round Up

by Liza Eliano on August 9, 2010 · 51 comments Newswire

Forget galleries and museums. Footwear is the new frontier for exhibiting work. AFC brings you the greatest and latest list of this burgeoning trend in wearable art: the art sneaker!

Keds x Jenny Holzer for the Whitney
In most recent art sneaker news, the Whitney and conceptual artist Jenny Holzer have collaborated with Keds to support the museum’s summer season, including the Whitney Live series of musical performances every Friday. Holzer, most famous for publishing texts, or truisms, on different media, reuses one of her vintage isms from her 1980 “Survival” series for these limited edition sneakers. “Protect me from what I want,” which has appeared on everything from condoms to LED signs, in this case evokes the question: do the sneakers protect me from wanting more sneakers? Not if the Whitney has a say. The museum also gave shoppers the chance to create their own artsy Keds with a touchscreen customizer in the Bloomingdale’s windows (a nifty piece of technology that luckily means you never have to enter the department store). Unfortunately, there’s no chance here to write “sweatshop” across your sneaker like Jonah Peretti tried to do for Nike’s personalized shoes, prompting a back and forth email battle between Peretti and Nike. While visitors could design every inch of their shoe, right down to the lace holes, the Whitney played it safe with design choices of only block colors or graphic patterns. Bloomingdale’s visitors could also ogle three MFA students selected to create works in the windows for the third installment of this sponsorship bonanza: “Works on Canvas.” Artists Erica Greenwald, Jee Young Choi, and Natalia Yovane were chosen after competing against other students to paint behind glass. In order to win, their work needed to show “relevance to the Keds and Bloomingdale’s brands” and “American spirit,” according to ARTINFO’s posting. These requirements, plus the caged artist in a window set up, produce even more degrading conditions than the bismal Work of Art Challenges. The windows closed on July 21st, but the Whitney Live performances continue throughout August in the museum’s Gallery and Sculpture Court.

Tommy Hilfiger x Keith Haring

What hasn’t Keith Haring’s art been featured on? Its probably possible to wear and use only Haring merchandise, especially now that a sneaker has been added to the list. I’m mostly surprised this hasn’t happened sooner–Tommy Hilfiger’s line of Haring footwear, which includes sneakers and rainboots for men, women, and kids, is currently available at colette in Paris, but doesn’t officially launch until September and only in Europe. The collaboration brings together both the Keith Haring Foundation and Hilfiger’s organization to empower America’s youth, the Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation. Haring’s colorful dancing figures are well suited for shoe design, and you’ll have no trouble figuring out what to wear them with. Pair them with the Haring T-shirts, pins, water bottles, cuff links, condoms, or even baby bibs!

Reebok x Jean-Michel Basquiat and Reebok x Rolland Berry

Reebox may have an obsession with art sneakers. They’ve turned out several editions of kicks inspired by artists Jean-Michel Basquiat and Rolland Berry, plus a Rolland Berry x Basquiat mash-up–the super art sneaker to rule them all. Styles in honor of NYC graffiti artist and neo-expressionist, Basquiat, include the Reebok Ex-O-Fit Basquiat, the Reebok NPC Clean Basquiat, the Reebok Top Basquiat, and this season’s collection that features sneakers and t-shirts inspired by the artist’s work form 1981. The series is a nice homage to the late artist, especially the newest version that’s a simple white sneaker with black stitched text and Basquiat’s signature crown on the tongue. The Rolland Berry styles are louder and mix Berry’s abstract graphics and cartoon-like figures.

Clarks x FUTURA

Not surprisingly, graffiti artists are a popular pick for sneaker designs since they usually make for bright, colorful shoes. But what happens when you turn that color doody brown and slap it on a weirdly shaped boot? Nothing pretty. Clark’s remake of their classic Wallabee shoe with design by the cult graffiti artist FUTURA does just this, taking the award for ugliest art sneaker. Clarks took a hint and tried to make their new edition of Wallabees x FUTURA more vibrant with “painterly spots and splotches in a plethora of colors.” These, too, no one will wear.

HUF x Barry Mcgee

Just like the art world, the art sneaker world has its share of controversy. West Coast artist Barry Mcgee rubbed people the wrong way when he teamed up with adidas and San Francisco-based store, HUF, to create a sneaker for the adidas adicolor yellow line. Mcgee’s use of his slant-eyed, pig nose caricature, dubbed Ray Fong, on the shoe’s tongue was seen as racist and spurred mass emails calling for boycotts of adidas products. Considering Mcgee is half Chinese and the caricature is based on a photo of himself at age eight, the racists accusations are a little far fetched. That doesn’t mean you should wear the shoe. The inside has a lot more going on then the outside, which is also that unfortunate doody brown. The insert sports the illustration of Ray Fong. Too bad only the sole of your foot will be seeing it.

Puma x Kehinde Wiley for the World Cup

The World Cup frenzy ended weeks ago, but sponsor news never grows old. Two years before the vuvuzela and World Cup psychic octopus craze, Puma commissioned Kehinde Wiley to create life-size paintings of African football stars like Samuel Eto’o of Cameroon, John Mensah of Ghana, and Emmanuel Eboue of Ivory Coast. For this year’s Cup, Wiley designed the “African Lifestyle” line of sneakers and apparel for Puma.  The artwork and design collection traveled the world in 2010, landing in exhibits everywhere from New York to China, and finally in Johannesburg in time for the game kickoff. These sneakers are some of the nicest out of the lot, plus who wasn’t secretly rooting for the African teams all along? Even though the bloodbath is over, you can still wear your support!

Puma x Roy Lichtenstein

Puma’s collaboration with American pop artist  Roy Lichtenstein has also turned out some fresh low-tops and high-tops. More understated that what you’d expect from a Lichtenstein art shoe, these sneakers make use of the artist’s signature Benday dots and thick lines for Puma’s Popart collection of 917’s. The yellow ones are a favorite, although the cartoon illusion probably holds up more in the photo than in the IRL version.

Converse Chuck Taylor x Terence Koh

Its the moment you knew was coming—a Converse art sneaker with philanthropy mixed in. Terence Koh is one of a hundred artists asked to design Converse for 1HUND(RED), Chuck Taylor’s collaboration with the AIDS fundrasing organization, (RED). Koh focused on subtraction for his design, noting in the press release that “I wanted to keep the DNA of the Chuck Taylor intact, while reducing the seams, and smoothing out the shoe’s surface as much as possible.”  The result? A blank canvas that’s just asking to be doodled on. But change is the point. Also from the press release: “A percentage of the net wholesale of this shoe will go to help fight AIDS in Africa, giving consumers an opportunity to become agents of change and offering a way to turn design into power.”  Its not the most thrilling (or arty, for that matter) of art sneakers, but we’re on board for the good cause.


  • atonaladam

    Commercial art is no different than fine art today. Granted one can create tiers/catagories in both venues- but this re-confirms blurring the line. Where does the money go when it is done for ‘philanthropic reasons’, how many of you really follow it? I have.

    These sneakers –amid magazine work, wine labels, vodka ads, perfume etc, equalizes both commercial and fine art even further. Many people can relate to these things, and the work that fine artists have done for commercial ads, magazines, etc blurs the line deeply.

    Capitalism has sold fine artists the idea that this is culture. Does anyone remember what culture is? Thoughts anyone?

    God knows I could never afford this, especially growing up…

  • atonaladam

    Commercial art is no different than fine art today. Granted one can create tiers/catagories in both venues- but this re-confirms blurring the line. Where does the money go when it is done for ‘philanthropic reasons’, how many of you really follow it? I have.

    These sneakers –amid magazine work, wine labels, vodka ads, perfume etc, equalizes both commercial and fine art even further. Many people can relate to these things, and the work that fine artists have done for commercial ads, magazines, etc blurs the line deeply.

    Capitalism has sold fine artists the idea that this is culture. Does anyone remember what culture is? Thoughts anyone?

    God knows I could never afford this, especially growing up…

  • atonaladam

    Commercial art is no different than fine art today. Granted one can create tiers/catagories in both venues- but this re-confirms blurring the line. Where does the money go when it is done for ‘philanthropic reasons’, how many of you really follow it? I have.

    These sneakers –amid magazine work, wine labels, vodka ads, perfume etc, equalizes both commercial and fine art even further. Many people can relate to these things, and the work that fine artists have done for commercial ads, magazines, etc blurs the line deeply.

    Capitalism has sold fine artists the idea that this is culture. Does anyone remember what culture is? Thoughts anyone?

    God knows I could never afford this, especially growing up…

  • sven

    if it benefits charity, then all the more power to them, but the convergence of commercialization with art gets so tired fast. Made me want to read simon hantai’s obit once more for some sign of clarity among artists.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/29/arts/design/29hantai.html?_r=2&scp=1&sq=simon%20hantai&st=cse&oref=slogin
    wasn’t there a time when respectable artists consciously turned their back on commercialization?

    • Stephanie

      thank you for posting that. Hantai is a hero of mine.

  • sven

    if it benefits charity, then all the more power to them, but the convergence of commercialization with art gets so tired fast. Made me want to read simon hantai’s obit once more for some sign of clarity among artists.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/29/arts/design/29hantai.html?_r=2&scp=1&sq=simon%20hantai&st=cse&oref=slogin
    wasn’t there a time when respectable artists consciously turned their back on commercialization?

    • Stephanie

      thank you for posting that. Hantai is a hero of mine.

  • http://www.milgobufkin.com Steven Meslerr
  • http://www.milgobufkin.com Steven Meslerr
  • http://www.milgobufkin.com Steven Meslerr
  • http://hypothete.com Hypothete

    My response: http://hypothete.blogspot.com/2010/08/light-makes-flight.html I’d love to see more of AFC’s artist commenters play around with their own footwear. Could be interesting. Also:

    >Sven: wasn’t there a time when respectable artists consciously turned their back on commercialization?

    A lot of people seem to have this attitude. As an unemployed artist, it makes me wonder: how are artists *supposed* to survive?

    See you in the bread lines,
    Duncan A. (Hypothete)

    • http://www.artfagcity.com Art Fag City

      I think this will be the lead for a new call for submissions.

    • sven

      You starve for your art and integrity, as many great artists have done throughout history.

      • http://www.artfagcity.com Art Fag City

        This idea that artists should have to suffer to make honest noble art needs to be done away with. I’d rather see a good artist receive plenty of money to create their work than not. And if they make a bit of bad work in the process so be it. It’s no different than when underfunded artists don’t make work they want to because they don’t have the money to do so.

        • sven

          its not that they need to suffer; if they are successful, have benefactors/patrons or come from money, all the better.
          Name a few examples where commercialization resulted in better art (and by commercialization I don’t mean selling one’s art for high prices, I mean using one’s abilities to cash in on lesser diversions. such as advertisement). How many of the great modernists were designing perfume bottles? If one does something to sustain oneself or one’s practice, I completely understand…….but do you think those wiley sneakers are in any way good art or help his art expand in positive ways?. (i think they are cute sneakers btw, I just felt like an idiot looking at them in Dietch’s gallery)

        • sven

          its not that they need to suffer; if they are successful, have benefactors/patrons or come from money, all the better.
          Name a few examples where commercialization resulted in better art (and by commercialization I don’t mean selling one’s art for high prices, I mean using one’s abilities to cash in on lesser diversions. such as advertisement). How many of the great modernists were designing perfume bottles? If one does something to sustain oneself or one’s practice, I completely understand…….but do you think those wiley sneakers are in any way good art or help his art expand in positive ways?. (i think they are cute sneakers btw, I just felt like an idiot looking at them in Dietch’s gallery)

        • atonaladam

          For me, these sneakers are not art because it is not in keeping with that artist’s vision. I totally agree AFC that artists need not be poor and suffer! It’s also a myth to think that many (recognized) artists from the past were poor; many were middle class and came from money.

          Many did commercial work, but did not promote it as ‘their art’: Jasper Johns, Dekooning, Ad Reinhardt, Warhol, Hopper, etc… all did ‘successful’ commercial work before they were recognized as fine artists so they could eat. Of that commercial work done then, what has merit today?

          Today, in order to be a recognized commercial artist one must have an individual voice, just as a fine artist (post 1960). And there is, at times, a fine line between the two, especially when these sneakers are considered ‘fine art’.

          If it is done for charity, why doesn’t the artist just donate a small artwork/print rather than hook up with a commercial/corporate venue to create material goods that is sold to the public as art. Plenty of cool commercial goods already exist…

        • atonaladam

          For me, these sneakers are not art because it is not in keeping with that artist’s vision. I totally agree AFC that artists need not be poor and suffer! It’s also a myth to think that many (recognized) artists from the past were poor; many were middle class and came from money.

          Many did commercial work, but did not promote it as ‘their art’: Jasper Johns, Dekooning, Ad Reinhardt, Warhol, Hopper, etc… all did ‘successful’ commercial work before they were recognized as fine artists so they could eat. Of that commercial work done then, what has merit today?

          Today, in order to be a recognized commercial artist one must have an individual voice, just as a fine artist (post 1960). And there is, at times, a fine line between the two, especially when these sneakers are considered ‘fine art’.

          If it is done for charity, why doesn’t the artist just donate a small artwork/print rather than hook up with a commercial/corporate venue to create material goods that is sold to the public as art. Plenty of cool commercial goods already exist…

  • http://hypothete.com Hypothete

    My response: http://hypothete.blogspot.com/2010/08/light-makes-flight.html I’d love to see more of AFC’s artist commenters play around with their own footwear. Could be interesting. Also:

    >Sven: wasn’t there a time when respectable artists consciously turned their back on commercialization?

    A lot of people seem to have this attitude. As an unemployed artist, it makes me wonder: how are artists *supposed* to survive?

    See you in the bread lines,
    Duncan A. (Hypothete)

    • http://www.artfagcity.com Art Fag City

      I think this will be the lead for a new call for submissions.

    • sven

      You starve for your art and integrity, as many great artists have done throughout history.

      • http://www.artfagcity.com Art Fag City

        This idea that artists should have to suffer to make honest noble art needs to be done away with. I’d rather see a good artist receive plenty of money to create their work than not. And if they make a bit of bad work in the process so be it. It’s no different than when underfunded artists don’t make work they want to because they don’t have the money to do so.

        • sven

          its not that they need to suffer; if they are successful, have benefactors/patrons or come from money, all the better.
          Name a few examples where commercialization resulted in better art (and by commercialization I don’t mean selling one’s art for high prices, I mean using one’s abilities to cash in on lesser diversions. such as advertisement). How many of the great modernists were designing perfume bottles? If one does something to sustain oneself or one’s practice, I completely understand…….but do you think those wiley sneakers are in any way good art or help his art expand in positive ways?. (i think they are cute sneakers btw, I just felt like an idiot looking at them in Dietch’s gallery)

        • atonaladam

          For me, these sneakers are not art because it is not in keeping with that artist’s vision. I totally agree AFC that artists need not be poor and suffer! It’s also a myth to think that many (recognized) artists from the past were poor; many were middle class and came from money.

          Many did commercial work, but did not promote it as ‘their art’: Jasper Johns, Dekooning, Ad Reinhardt, Warhol, Hopper, etc… all did ‘successful’ commercial work before they were recognized as fine artists so they could eat. Of that commercial work done then, what has merit today?

          Today, in order to be a recognized commercial artist one must have an individual voice, just as a fine artist (post 1960). And there is, at times, a fine line between the two, especially when these sneakers are considered ‘fine art’.

          If it is done for charity, why doesn’t the artist just donate a small artwork/print rather than hook up with a commercial/corporate venue to create material goods that is sold to the public as art. Plenty of cool commercial goods already exist…

  • Zander

    I am glad to see some Clarks in there. I agree with Jeff Wall when he said on “Bad at Sports” that he might have his own line of Hush Puppies but not sneakers. I think that artists “in the zone” tend to move too slow and deliberately for sneakers.

  • Zander

    I am glad to see some Clarks in there. I agree with Jeff Wall when he said on “Bad at Sports” that he might have his own line of Hush Puppies but not sneakers. I think that artists “in the zone” tend to move too slow and deliberately for sneakers.

  • Zander

    I am glad to see some Clarks in there. I agree with Jeff Wall when he said on “Bad at Sports” that he might have his own line of Hush Puppies but not sneakers. I think that artists “in the zone” tend to move too slow and deliberately for sneakers.

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  • Howard Halle

    I presume these are less expensive than BMW’s art cars; they’re still just as tacky, especially the Jenny Holzer Keds.

  • Howard Halle

    I presume these are less expensive than BMW’s art cars; they’re still just as tacky, especially the Jenny Holzer Keds.

  • Howard Halle

    I presume these are less expensive than BMW’s art cars; they’re still just as tacky, especially the Jenny Holzer Keds.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

    People/artists so often cling to the foundations of their own work and decry the latest new directions as shallow fads. I have TRIED not to become that way over the years and to embrace and absorb the present cultural flow around me…but I have to admit I get rigidly resistant to this cross current of commercial products and art. I somehow feel a desperate desire to cling to a mystical vision of art, as exactly NOT a product…outside of the maelstrom of stores, and malls, and magazine ads. I want art to remain in a realm more like science, without a profit motive, just pure curiosity, exploration, discovery out on the edges of the mind and imagination. More like taking LSD, more like a sacred ritual that is performed, more like magic. Is that just old fashioned? OK…so what about making money? I have no good answer for that for artists. Maybe every artists needs to find one good patron, not an employer, who just gives them a stipend to work.

    • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

      You might call that a “spouse” ….or in my case it’s a “tenant”.

    • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

      You might call that a “spouse” ….or in my case it’s a “tenant”.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

    People/artists so often cling to the foundations of their own work and decry the latest new directions as shallow fads. I have TRIED not to become that way over the years and to embrace and absorb the present cultural flow around me…but I have to admit I get rigidly resistant to this cross current of commercial products and art. I somehow feel a desperate desire to cling to a mystical vision of art, as exactly NOT a product…outside of the maelstrom of stores, and malls, and magazine ads. I want art to remain in a realm more like science, without a profit motive, just pure curiosity, exploration, discovery out on the edges of the mind and imagination. More like taking LSD, more like a sacred ritual that is performed, more like magic. Is that just old fashioned? OK…so what about making money? I have no good answer for that for artists. Maybe every artists needs to find one good patron, not an employer, who just gives them a stipend to work.

  • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

    People/artists so often cling to the foundations of their own work and decry the latest new directions as shallow fads. I have TRIED not to become that way over the years and to embrace and absorb the present cultural flow around me…but I have to admit I get rigidly resistant to this cross current of commercial products and art. I somehow feel a desperate desire to cling to a mystical vision of art, as exactly NOT a product…outside of the maelstrom of stores, and malls, and magazine ads. I want art to remain in a realm more like science, without a profit motive, just pure curiosity, exploration, discovery out on the edges of the mind and imagination. More like taking LSD, more like a sacred ritual that is performed, more like magic. Is that just old fashioned? OK…so what about making money? I have no good answer for that for artists. Maybe every artists needs to find one good patron, not an employer, who just gives them a stipend to work.

    • http://www.judithannbraun.com Judith Braun

      You might call that a “spouse” ….or in my case it’s a “tenant”.

  • sven

    I concur with your sentiment, Judith. I thought about this topic…..and the only interesting example of advertisement or product design mixing with art that came to mind was cindy sherman’s fashion work for diane b and comme des garcon. Some of these were successful as art, however they make a bad argument in support of this type of work as the whole message seems to be a big “Fuck You!” to the advertising and fashion world.
    from an interview:

    CS: Well, a lot of that came out of a response to the clothes. I felt forced to use these clothes. I didn’t have a choice.

    BS Were you embarrassed by them? Exposed or…

    CS The clothing, you mean? No, it was just that some of them were so weird. Some of Dianne B.’s stuff was really bizarre; Issey Miyake straw coats with poles that stuck up from the shoulders. The Comme Des Garcons stuff was like expensive bag-lady clothing…I was real interested in what the clothing was bringing out of me and some of it was a retaliation against fashion, as well as humor. But to see in magazines what they do with those kinds of clothes—they have this beautiful, skinny model in some tattered-up dress that costs a thousand dollars. I’m not doing anything else for fashion right now, so I’ll just use whatever is in my closet.”

    I am interested if anyone can show any other positive examples.

  • sven

    I concur with your sentiment, Judith. I thought about this topic…..and the only interesting example of advertisement or product design mixing with art that came to mind was cindy sherman’s fashion work for diane b and comme des garcon. Some of these were successful as art, however they make a bad argument in support of this type of work as the whole message seems to be a big “Fuck You!” to the advertising and fashion world.
    from an interview:

    CS: Well, a lot of that came out of a response to the clothes. I felt forced to use these clothes. I didn’t have a choice.

    BS Were you embarrassed by them? Exposed or…

    CS The clothing, you mean? No, it was just that some of them were so weird. Some of Dianne B.’s stuff was really bizarre; Issey Miyake straw coats with poles that stuck up from the shoulders. The Comme Des Garcons stuff was like expensive bag-lady clothing…I was real interested in what the clothing was bringing out of me and some of it was a retaliation against fashion, as well as humor. But to see in magazines what they do with those kinds of clothes—they have this beautiful, skinny model in some tattered-up dress that costs a thousand dollars. I’m not doing anything else for fashion right now, so I’ll just use whatever is in my closet.”

    I am interested if anyone can show any other positive examples.

  • sven

    I concur with your sentiment, Judith. I thought about this topic…..and the only interesting example of advertisement or product design mixing with art that came to mind was cindy sherman’s fashion work for diane b and comme des garcon. Some of these were successful as art, however they make a bad argument in support of this type of work as the whole message seems to be a big “Fuck You!” to the advertising and fashion world.
    from an interview:

    CS: Well, a lot of that came out of a response to the clothes. I felt forced to use these clothes. I didn’t have a choice.

    BS Were you embarrassed by them? Exposed or…

    CS The clothing, you mean? No, it was just that some of them were so weird. Some of Dianne B.’s stuff was really bizarre; Issey Miyake straw coats with poles that stuck up from the shoulders. The Comme Des Garcons stuff was like expensive bag-lady clothing…I was real interested in what the clothing was bringing out of me and some of it was a retaliation against fashion, as well as humor. But to see in magazines what they do with those kinds of clothes—they have this beautiful, skinny model in some tattered-up dress that costs a thousand dollars. I’m not doing anything else for fashion right now, so I’ll just use whatever is in my closet.”

    I am interested if anyone can show any other positive examples.

  • http://confusedandblazed.tumblr.com Keesean

    Amazing! It’s good to know that Keith Haring’s designs are still alive and wearable…although i’d kill for some of his earlier, provocative, phallic-heavy work on a t-shirt.

    Talk about a statement piece.

  • http://confusedandblazed.tumblr.com Keesean

    Amazing! It’s good to know that Keith Haring’s designs are still alive and wearable…although i’d kill for some of his earlier, provocative, phallic-heavy work on a t-shirt.

    Talk about a statement piece.

  • http://confusedandblazed.tumblr.com Keesean

    Amazing! It’s good to know that Keith Haring’s designs are still alive and wearable…although i’d kill for some of his earlier, provocative, phallic-heavy work on a t-shirt.

    Talk about a statement piece.

  • teatiller

    as an artist, i initially am jealous and envious of not being the celebrity enough to be getting a line of shoe, but if the shoes increase awareness and patronage of the arts, then that;s great. Just I know that I can;t afford them, and I can always just pain my own shoes, thank you very much.

  • teatiller

    as an artist, i initially am jealous and envious of not being the celebrity enough to be getting a line of shoe, but if the shoes increase awareness and patronage of the arts, then that;s great. Just I know that I can;t afford them, and I can always just pain my own shoes, thank you very much.

  • teatiller

    as an artist, i initially am jealous and envious of not being the celebrity enough to be getting a line of shoe, but if the shoes increase awareness and patronage of the arts, then that;s great. Just I know that I can;t afford them, and I can always just pain my own shoes, thank you very much.

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