From the category archives:

Baltimore

We Went to Artscape: Weird Futures on Saratoga Street

by Paddy Johnson and Michael Anthony Farley on July 21, 2016
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Do you believe the children are the future? What about their future pasts? At Maryland Art Place we checked in on Young Blood, a survey of recent area MFA grads, including DIY Star Trek and paintings corrupted like future JPEGs. Upstairs at Terrault Contemporary, Kaita Niwa time travels with the magic of CGI and a creepy child avatar.

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We Went to Artscape: The Artist-Run Art Fair

by Paddy Johnson and Michael Anthony Farley on July 19, 2016
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We returned to Open Space’s Artist-Run Art Fair at Artscape in Baltimore.
Michael: About fifteen feet into the garage, I was struck by the impression that the scrappy Artist-Run Art Fair had suddenly started to look much more like… an art fair.
Paddy: So, the elephant in the room: “The White Guilt Confessional Booth”.

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We Went to Baltimore Part II: Platform, Springsteen, First Continent

by Michael Anthony Farley and Molly Rhinestones on July 14, 2016
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Artscape, Baltimore’s annual, gigantic public art festival, and the Artist-Run Art Fair launch this week. Yesterday, we posted about a few local galleries ahead of time to scope out what’s on view across town from the main festivities. Today, we’re discussing exhibitions from Melissa Godoy Nieto and Lane Harlan at Platform, Colin Foster at Springsteen, and Michael Assiff at First Continent. 

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We Went to Baltimore Part 1: Current & Open Space

by Michael Anthony Farley and Molly Rhinestones on July 12, 2016
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Artscape, Baltimore’s annual, gigantic public art festival, and the Artist-Run Art Fair launch this week. We visited a few local galleries ahead of time to scope out what’s on view across town from the main festivities. We saw too much art to fit into one post, but we’ll start off with solo projects from Jonathan Latiano, Jon Duff, and Jihyun Hong.

Molly: I want to preface this by saying I have a “cheeto as medium” art fetish to a fault…

Michael: This installation is so calmingly sparse I wanted to live in it. It’s also such a puzzling assortment of objects that everyone had a great time speculating what it was all about. Even a seemingly-inebriated couple who happened to be walking by the gallery had their take…

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#FOMO in Suburbia

by Michael Anthony Farley on July 6, 2016
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I arrived late to the opening reception of Love Me and Delete Me. The gallery is located on a community college campus in a not-very-convenient suburb outside Baltimore. By the time I found it, performance artists and noise musicians had finished their sets and were smoking outside on the otherwise deserted brutalist campus. The scene looked as if it had been plucked from a low-budget post-apocalyptic sci fi film from the 80s. It was an appropriately dystopian prelude to an exhibition about technology and isolation.

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Carbon-Based Lifeform: Hermonie “Only” Williams at Gallery Four

by Michael Anthony Farley on June 23, 2016
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Hermonie “Only” Williams’ coldly-precise forms have emotional weight beneath sleek surface.

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The Printing’s on the Wall: Eva Wylie at ICA Baltimore

by Michael Anthony Farley on June 17, 2016
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In Eva Wylie’s solo exhibition with ICA Baltimore, the printmaker silkscreens collage-like imagery directly on the walls.

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The World’s Longest Game of Telephone: An Interview with Lexie Mountain

by Michael Anthony Farley on May 18, 2016
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Artist, writer, curator, and musician Lexie Mountain is planning to break the Guinness World Record for the longest game of “telephone”, the childhood pastime wherein participants whisper a phrase from one end of a line to another. Along the way, the message might be misheard, mutate, and end up with a totally different meaning. It’s a fitting endeavor for Lexie Mountain, who has a prolific oeuvre of examining and manipulating meaning in a variety of media—from performances live-remixing audience-recorded tapes to dissecting the tropes and idiosyncrasies of art history.

This Sunday, (hopefully) more than 1,330 people will snake throughout the galleries of the Walter’s Art Museum in Baltimore, following a line of red tape, to pass along a phrase Lexie will whisper in one participant’s ear. We sat down to discuss the project, Egyptian gods, and documentation just across the park from the museum.

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Abigail DeVille Mines America’s Oldest Museum

by Michael Anthony Farley on April 28, 2016
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Abigail DeVille’s ambitious solo exhibition Only When It’s Dark Enough Can You See The Stars dredges up the history of the defunct Peale Museum, set to reopen later this year.

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