From the category archives:

Opinion

Racist Quebec Film Draws Ire from Everyone

by Rea McNamara on November 27, 2015
Thumbnail image for Racist Quebec Film Draws Ire from Everyone

White guys are at it again. Earlier this week, Quebec filmmaker Dominic Gagnon’s of the North enraged Inuit throat singer Tanya Tagaq as a “painful and racist” experimental documentary that used her music without permission. Tagaq took to Twitter to complain about the Montreal International Documentary Film Festival’s (RIDM) recent screening of the film.

And she’s not wrong to be upset. A bit of background: of the North compiles user-generated YouTube footage from Nunavut and Northern Quebec; it’s a mash-up of Arctic tundra landscapes populated with oil rigs, hunting, and skidoos but also Inuit men vomiting after drinking binges, and even a desperate Buñuel-esque edit of a vagina that cuts into a video of a dog’s tail hair being trimmed.

Read the full article →

Will Electronic Superhighway Accurately Historicize New Media and Internet Art?

by Rea McNamara on November 13, 2015
Thumbnail image for Will Electronic Superhighway Accurately Historicize New Media and Internet Art?

How has technology impacted art? Whitechapel Gallery will be addressing this question in a landmark exhibition launching in January 2016. Entitled Electronic Superhighway (2016-1966), the show will bring together over 100 multimedia artworks from the past 50 years. Over 70 artists will be involved, including Nam June Paik, Cory Arcangel, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Hito Steyerl, Jeremy Bailey, Amalia Ulman, Douglas Coupland and Judith Barry.

The show is clearly a major coup for its curator, Omar Kholeif, whose rise in the artworld has garnered comparisons with Hans Ulrich Obrist. It’s an ambitious survey that is much needed in a genre still struggling for institutional validation. So, it’s concerning that a majority of the internet art represented in the show will come via the archives of new media non-profit, Rhizome. While Rhizome has substantially impacted collecting and preserving digital art works, they still only represent the perspective of one organization.

Read the full article →

The Enduring Stink of Lucien Smith’s Out of Touch Art Rave

by Rea McNamara on November 3, 2015
Thumbnail image for The Enduring Stink of Lucien Smith’s Out of Touch Art Rave

Jeanne Greenberg-Rohatyn is on clean-up duty. Since last Monday’s deluge of overwhelming negative press over artist Lucien Smith’s “Macabre Suite”, the art dealer has faced fire for co-hosting Smith’s “curated” event in celebration of two new luxury condo towers breaking ground along the South Bronx waterfront. (Conveniently enough, Greenberg-Rohatyn is rumored to be starting another gallery in the Bronx.)

Read the full article →

FAIR AND BALANCED: Paddy & Michael Look at BIG’s New Plans for a Fox WTC Tower

by Paddy Johnson and Michael Anthony Farley on June 9, 2015
Thumbnail image for FAIR AND BALANCED: Paddy & Michael Look at BIG’s New Plans for a Fox WTC Tower

Bjarke Ingles Group has just unveiled plans for WTC Tower 2, a huge departure from the slightly yawn-inducing Norman Foster proposal. Since this thing is going to forever change the Manhattan skyline, we’re weighing in on the new design, which will be the new home of Fox News, among other tenants.

Read the full article →

Too Little Too Late: The Art World’s Letter-Writing Campaign to the UAE

by Michael Anthony Farley on June 3, 2015
Thumbnail image for Too Little Too Late: The Art World’s Letter-Writing Campaign to the UAE

This week, cultural leaders signed a letter protesting the United Arab Emirates’ decision to bar labor activists from entering the country. That’s great, but why are cultural institutions opening satellite campuses in a right-wing authoritarian state in the first place?

Read the full article →

Islamic State and the Reinvention of Iconoclasm

by Corinna Kirsch on June 1, 2015
Thumbnail image for Islamic State and the Reinvention of Iconoclasm

Art gives power to the already-powerful. But when the powerful are dethroned, their art usually comes tumbling down with them. That’s political iconoclasm: the destruction of statues, monuments, and images by those newly in power. Out with the old, in with the new.

Read the full article →

Seriously, Fuck You, Georg Baselitz

by Paddy Johnson on May 21, 2015
Thumbnail image for Seriously, Fuck You, Georg Baselitz

Can collectors all just agree never to buy a Georg Baselitz painting again?

Read the full article →

The Dot Meme Mutates at Zwirner

by Paddy Johnson on May 11, 2015
Thumbnail image for The Dot Meme Mutates at Zwirner

Be afraid.

Read the full article →

What’s the Use of an Art Critic in a City on Fire?

by Michael Anthony Farley on April 28, 2015
Thumbnail image for What’s the Use of an Art Critic in a City on Fire?

For the past twenty-four hours or so, I’ve been struggling to write about the situation here in Baltimore. I’ve tried doing my job—reviewing art shows—but even attempting to view politically informed projects in Baltimore through the lens of recent events felt strangely inappropriate. Like many bewildered Baltimoreans, any coherent thoughts I’ve attempted to compile have been quickly drowned out and scattered by the sounds of sirens and countless low-flying helicopters.

Read the full article →

Sanitizing the Web: Google’s Mobile-Friendly Update

by Corinna Kirsch on April 22, 2015
Thumbnail image for Sanitizing the Web: Google’s Mobile-Friendly Update

Crappy websites, art websites, old websites—Google is pushing you out. This is gentrification on the web.

Read the full article →