Archive of Paddy Johnson

Paddy Johnson is the founding editor of Art Fag City. In addition to her work on the blog, she has been published in New York Magazine, artreview.com, Art in America, The Daily, Print Magazine, Time Out NY, The Reeler, The Daily Beast, The Huffington Post, The Guardian, and New York Press, and linked to by publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, New York Magazine, Boing-Boing, The New York Observer, Gawker, Design Observer, Make Magazine, The Awl, Artinfo, and we-make-money-not-art. Paddy lectures widely about art and the Internet at venues including Yale University, Parsons, Rutgers, South by Southwest, and the Whitney Independent Study Program. In 2008, she became the first blogger to earn a Creative Capital Arts Writers grant from the Creative Capital Foundation. Paddy is also the art editor at The L Magazine, where she writes a regular column.

Paddy has written 1536 article(s) for AFC.

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Paddy Johnson

Explain Me: Related Utopias—Bitcoin Economies and the Art World

by Paddy Johnson on May 1, 2018
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This week on Explain Me, William Powhida and Paddy Johnson talk with artist Kevin McCoy about Blockchain, Bitcoin and the Monegraph. This episode is your ultimate bitcoin/blockchain/monegraph explainer.


LINKS 

Monegraph

Seven on Seven, 2014

Public Key/Private Key

READING LIST  

Hito Steyerl – If you don’t have bread, eat Art!
Does Digital Culture Want to be Free?
How blockchains are transforming the economy of cultural goods

http://www.academia.edu/33838249/Does_digital_culture_want_to_be_free_How_blockchains_are_transforming_the_economy_of_cultural_goods

Show sponsor:

Superfine

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Explain Me: The New Museum Triennial—Two Critics Perform Their Own Acts of Sabotage

by Paddy Johnson on April 18, 2018
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In this episode of Explain Me, Paddy Johnson and William Powhida discuss the New Museum Triennial. Both Johnson and Powhida agree this show has more of its fair share of bad art but only Powhida sees this as a dealbreaker. Debate ensues. The ad in which Pepsi and model Kendall Jenner create world peace gets a mention.

Thanks to Explain Me sponsor, Superfine

Laura Ouramonde

Lydia Ourahmane, “Finitude, 2018, Courtesy of the Artist

Chemu Ng’ok Image via: Hyperallergic

Chemu Ng’ok Image via: Hyperallergic

 

Anupam Roy installation view

Anupam Roy installation view

Gresham Tapiwa Nyaude, The New Zimbabwe (2018) at "2018 Triennial: Songs

Gresham Tapiwa Nyaude, The New Zimbabwe (2018) at “2018 Triennial: Songs

 

Manolis D. Lemos, dusk and dawn look just the same (riot tourism), 2017 (still). Courtesy of the artist and CAN Christina Androulidaki Gallery, Athens

Manolis D. Lemos, dusk and dawn look just the same (riot tourism), 2017 (still). Courtesy of the artist and CAN Christina Androulidaki Gallery, Athens

Haroon Gunn-Salie “Senzenina” (2018), an installation by the South African artist Haroon Gunn- Salie, memorializes the 2012 police massacre of striking miners in his homeland.

Haroon Gunn-Salie “Senzenina” (2018), an installation by the South African artist Haroon Gunn- Salie, memorializes the 2012 police massacre of striking miners in his homeland.

 

Hardeep Pandhal, Pool Party Pilot Episode, 2018, 4K animation, color, sound; 8:10 min. Hardeep Pandhal.

Hardeep Pandhal, Pool Party Pilot Episode, 2018, 4K animation, color, sound; 8:10 min. Hardeep Pandhal.

 

Tomm El-Saieh

Tomm El-Saieh

 

Tiril Hasselknippe

Tiril Hasselknippe, installation view

PRONOUNCIATION GUIDE

Gary Carrion-Murayari

** Carry-on Mur-uh-yar-ee

Tomm El-Saieh

** El-say

Lydia Ourahmane

** Oura-ha-mane

Chemu Ng’ok

** Chem-oo Nuh-gok

Gresham Tapiwa Nyaude

** Tap-ee-wa Naw-u-deh

Manolis D. Lemos

** Man-o-lis Lem-os

Tiril Hasselknippe

** Tir-ill Has-ul-nip

Hardeep Pandhal

** Pand-al

Haroon Gunn-Salie ** Sal-ley

Anupam Roy

** A-new-pam

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Explain Me: The Spring Break Art Show Part One and Two With Pictures!

by Paddy Johnson on March 17, 2018
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Last week William Powhida and I spent an enormous amount of time at the Spring Break Art Show. We had so much to say about the show we produced two podcasts and discussed many booths at length. In the first podcast, we give the lay of the land in art fair world (we discuss the character of other fairs, and SPRING/BREAK), identify themes, and get the bad art out of the way. We also collect a few pitches from those in booths, so those who couldn’t attend the fair could get a sense of what it was like. In the second podcast we go deep on a few booths and try to give a more thorough analysis of what we saw.

There are however some limitations to what we can do with a podcast, and one of them is visuals. Handily, Art F City manages those just fine, so in this post I assemble images of a lot of the work we discuss so that listeners have a few cues. That said, a disclaimer needs to be made: some of these photographs suck. I’ve tried whenever possible to use press images, but in some cases, I wasn’t able to make that happen. You’ll know the difference, and I’m sorry.

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Hans Ulrich Obrist Interested in Time, Hans Ulrich Obrist

by Paddy Johnson on March 16, 2018
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The line for last week’s keynote lecture at the Armory Show was as long as the speaker’s resume; slated to talk was Hans Ulrich Obrist, artistic director of the Serpentine Gallery and arguably the most famous curator in the world. But since Obrist is a fixture at large art fairs, the huge turnout was a surprise. Having watched a few of his interviews online, I worried that the talk would be a pretentious ramble. My fears weren’t entirely unfounded, though no one could accuse Obrist of lacking enthusiasm as he spent well over an hour discussing notions of time, the archive, unrealized projects, and the Serpentine’s recent shows. Central to all of this was his belief in the freedom to experiment.

But Obrist’s talk had limited success in getting attendees fired up, likely because of the curator’s consistent failure to fully elucidate his themes.

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Carol Cole: Cast a Clear Light at The Weatherspoon

by Paddy Johnson on February 21, 2018
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Exciting news: I’ve co-curated an exhibition of Carol Cole’s work and collection at the Weatherspoon with Emily Stamey! This exhibition is long overdue, so I’m proud to have had a part in making it happen. Carol Cole: Cast a Clear Light opens March 3rd and will run through June 17th. If you have a chance to see it, make it happen. You won’t be disappointed.

Press release after the jump.

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Explain Me: The Stink of Met Admission Hikes Endures

by Paddy Johnson on February 21, 2018
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Back in January, William Powhida and I recorded an episode of Explain Me on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s new admission policy. Earlier that month, the museum known for housing some of the world’s greatest treasures announced its admission price would no longer remain “pay-as-you-wish”. As of March 1st, their suggested admission, $25 will become mandatory for anyone living outside of New York State. Children under 12 get in for free.

Given that there’s less than two weeks until this policy change goes into affect, we thought it might be a good time to release our discussion and revisit the debate.

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Explain Me: What Curators Really Think—A Cringe Worthy Report

by Paddy Johnson on December 29, 2017
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On this episode of Explain Me we discuss a disastrous curator conference at SVA titled “Curatorial Activism and the Politics of Shock”, the Miami art fairs, and three shows— “Talon Rouge: Six Mexican Artists Revisit José Juan Tablada and His New York Circle” at PROXYCO, “Johnny Abrahams: Threnody” at The Hole and “Molly Zuckerman-Hartung: Learning Artist” and “Maryam Hoseini Of Strangers and Parrots” at Rachel Uffner.

Links and show images mentioned in the discussion below:

CAFKA
TJ Clark – Farewell to an idea
PROXYCO
“Johnny Abrahams: Threnody” at The Hole
“Molly Zuckerman-Hartung: Learning Artist” and “Maryam Hoseini Of Strangers and Parrots” at Rachel Uffner

Installation view, Johnny Abrahams “Threnody"

Installation view, Johnny Abrahams “Threnody”

Installation view, Maryam Hoseini, Of Strangers and Parrots, Rachel Uffner Gallery

Installation view, Maryam Hoseini, Of Strangers and Parrots, Rachel Uffner Gallery

 Installation view, Molly Zuckerman-Hartung, Learning Artist, Rachel Uffner Gallery


Installation view, Molly Zuckerman-Hartung, Learning Artist, Rachel Uffner Gallery

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From Donald Trump’s Lips to Future Clown’s Hips: Time to Resign!

by Paddy Johnson on December 20, 2017
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It’s a miserable day in American history. Republicans have passed a bill that will give corporations and wealthy millionaires massive tax cuts while reducing the services for virtually everyone else. They’ve included enrichment provisions that will benefit the president and senators who have been on the fence, and by lying to the American people. Previously, we’ve had presidents who wouldn’t condone, let alone encourage such actions. But this year, we have Donald Trump in office, a pathological liar, narcissist and mentally unstable dotard intent on leading us off a cliff. Naturally, he’s happy to sign a bill that benefits only him and his rich colleagues.

It’s time Donald Trump resigned. We have yet to see what will make this happen, but I hope artist Rachel Mason‘s video “Time to Resign” plays a part in making that happen. In this video she plays Future Clown, a character that can change the future. The character takes over Trump and splices together his words to produce a resignation speech. It’s the speech we all need and want to hear. Plus, it’s kinda catchy—useful for days like today.

Rachel Mason is an artist has interviewed and corresponded with some of the world’s most well known leaders, created busts in their likeness and performances and operas inspired by world events. She is the resistance. 

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Call for Submissions: We’re So Not Getting Our Security Deposit Back, Baltimore Edition

by Paddy Johnson on December 12, 2017
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Attention Baltimore artists and organizers! Art F City is compiling our second city-specific zine archiving defunct artist spaces. For our first edition, we focused on Washington DC, and for our second we’ll be focusing on Baltimore. That means if you’ve run an art space in the Baltimore area that is no longer in operation, we want to hear from you.  We want your story and your space in our zine. So fill out our survey, put together some pictures (300 dpi is best if you have it) and send it to submissions@artfcity.com by January 15th. The full call below.

Alex_Wein_Copycat_Project_small

Look around the sanitized streets of any contemporary city, and there’s a secret, often subversive history at risk of being forgotten. What’s now the nanny’s room in Brownstone Brooklyn might’ve been a tiny gallery in a riotous punk house. An American Apparel could have once been home to a cooperatively-run storefront space. And undoubtedly, those renovated loft condos once housed artists’ exhibition and studio spaces. Our cities are elephant graveyards of generations’ of artist’s aspirations and hard work made temporarily tangible. We ought to remember the artist-run space.

Art F City is pleased to announce We Are SO Not Getting the Security Deposit Back: a Guide to Defunct Artist-Run Spaces, a series of zines and e-books documenting the often-forgotten places where art making and viewing once happened. We’ll be releasing editions specific to cities such as New York, Baltimore, Chicago, and beyond, but welcome submissions from anywhere. If you were once a proprietor of a now-defunct artist-run space, or know someone who was, drop us a line. Whether your blood, sweat, and tears are barely dry or have long ago been whitewashed over, we want to hear your story.

Submit answers to the questions below to submissions@artfcity.com

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Gentrification, Income Inequality and Donald Trump Baby Turds

by Paddy Johnson on November 24, 2017
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In this episode of Explain Me William Powhida and Paddy Johnson talk about the 450 million dollar Leonardo Da Vinci of disputed authenticity and the Boyle Heights activists who follow artist Laura Owen’s from L.A. to New York to protest her non-profit 365 Mission while she visited The Whitney. Activists believe the presence of her gallery will lead to displacement. Additionally, we discuss the exhibitions listed below.

Listen to us on iTunes and Stitcher

Didier Williams

Didier Williams

Tiger Strikes Asteroid: Didier William, “We Will Win“. Review: A Haitian Artist’s Mesmerizing Eyes

Paddy Johnson failing to hula hoop and draw at the same time.

Paddy Johnson failing to hula hoop and draw at the same time.

The Museum of Human Achievement (in Austin TX)

Nicholas Cueva at Five Miles

Nicholas Cueva at Five Miles

Five Miles: Nicholas Cueva, “The People Games Play

Tracing Trajectories at Trestle Gallery - Installation view.

Tracing Trajectories at Trestle Gallery – Installation view.

Trestle Projects: Tracing Trajectories/Selections from the Hoggard/Wagner Collection 

From “Anteroom”, by Anita Thacher, 1982, 35mm color slide projection, brass doorknob and plate, sound, 108 x 144 x 3 inches – Image courtesy of the artist and Microscope Gallery

From “Anteroom”, by Anita Thacher, 1982, 35mm color slide projection, brass doorknob and plate, sound, 108 x 144 x 3 inches – Image courtesy of the artist and Microscope Gallery

Microscope Gallery: Anita Thacher, “Anteroom”

Rachel Rossin, Installation view at Signal Gallery

Rachel Rossin, Installation view at Signal Gallery

Rachel Rossin Aquarium detail

Rachel Rossin Aquarium detail

Signal Gallery: Rachel Rossin, “Peak Performance”

Installation view at Present Company

Installation view at Present Company

Myeongsoo Kim at Present Company

Myeongsoo Kim at Present Company

Present Company: Myeongsoo Kim and Jessie Rose Vala, “Dusk to Dust” 

Future Retrieval at Denny Gallery, Installation view

Future Retrieval at Denny Gallery, Installation view

Denny Gallery: Future Retrieval, Permanent Spectacle

Derek Eller Gallery: Whiting Tennis

Whiting Tennis, The Vegetarian

Whiting Tennis, The Vegetarian, at Derek Eller

Whiting Tennis at Derek Eller, Installation view

Whiting Tennis at Derek Eller, Installation view

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