[IMG MGMT] Squiggles, Trees, Ribbons and Spirals: My Collection of Women’s Health, Beauty and Support Group Logos as the Stages of Life in Semi-Particular Order

by Shana Moulton on September 21, 2010 · 137 comments IMG MGMT






Editors’ Note: IMG MGMT is a series of image based essays produced by artists. This week’s invited artist is Shana Moulton. Born in Oakhurst, CA, Moultan is a Brooklyn-based video and performance artist. She studied at UC Berkeley, Carnegie Mellon, and De Ateliers in Amsterdam. Moutlon has performed at The Kitchen, Performa 09, and Electronic Arts Intermix and her work has been exhibited at Art in General and the Migros Museum in Zurich.

{ 123 comments… read them below or add one }

Michael Manning September 21, 2010 at 9:54 pm

This pure brilliance. Excellent post.

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Michael Manning September 21, 2010 at 9:54 pm

This pure brilliance. Excellent post.

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Michael Manning September 21, 2010 at 5:54 pm

This pure brilliance. Excellent post.

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Hypothete September 21, 2010 at 11:09 pm

Yes, yes, 1000 times yes! My favorite is the women’s profiles evolving into Nebraska. Great essay.

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Hypothete September 21, 2010 at 7:09 pm

Yes, yes, 1000 times yes! My favorite is the women’s profiles evolving into Nebraska. Great essay.

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Leah Sandals September 22, 2010 at 12:54 am

Awesome! I feel like this is an art-crit piece that reaches out to the new daily-chewable-chocolate-flavoured-vitamin-d consumer in me. And I mean that seriously.

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Leah Sandals September 22, 2010 at 12:54 am

Awesome! I feel like this is an art-crit piece that reaches out to the new daily-chewable-chocolate-flavoured-vitamin-d consumer in me. And I mean that seriously.

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Leah Sandals September 21, 2010 at 8:54 pm

Awesome! I feel like this is an art-crit piece that reaches out to the new daily-chewable-chocolate-flavoured-vitamin-d consumer in me. And I mean that seriously.

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stephd September 22, 2010 at 3:46 am

amazing!

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stephd September 22, 2010 at 3:46 am

amazing!

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stephd September 21, 2010 at 11:46 pm

amazing!

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Benjamin Bruneau September 22, 2010 at 6:45 am

This is almost painful to experience… so enlightening, but it makes me cringe. Really, incredible.

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Benjamin Bruneau September 22, 2010 at 2:45 am

This is almost painful to experience… so enlightening, but it makes me cringe. Really, incredible.

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sally September 22, 2010 at 11:59 am

This is chilling. I feel horror and dread. Great collection!

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sally September 22, 2010 at 11:59 am

This is chilling. I feel horror and dread. Great collection!

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sally September 22, 2010 at 7:59 am

This is chilling. I feel horror and dread. Great collection!

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ola September 22, 2010 at 12:50 pm

wonderful, shana!!!!!!! <3

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ola September 22, 2010 at 8:50 am

wonderful, shana!!!!!!! <3

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jeremy bailey September 22, 2010 at 1:03 pm

this makes my face smile

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jeremy bailey September 22, 2010 at 9:03 am

this makes my face smile

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Little Tiny Fish September 22, 2010 at 2:36 pm

So tell me…are women body conscious?

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ward September 22, 2010 at 4:03 pm

yes

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Little Tiny Fish September 22, 2010 at 10:36 am

So tell me…are women body conscious?

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ward September 22, 2010 at 12:03 pm

yes

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Paul September 22, 2010 at 8:24 pm

Wow a good 25% + of those look like vaginas.

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Ally September 22, 2010 at 11:41 pm

ROFLCOPTER! Because that is totes what this is about right?

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Ally September 22, 2010 at 11:41 pm

ROFLCOPTER! Because that is totes what this is about right?

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Paul September 22, 2010 at 4:24 pm

Wow a good 25% + of those look like vaginas.

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Ally September 22, 2010 at 7:41 pm

ROFLCOPTER! Because that is totes what this is about right?

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amandalbs September 22, 2010 at 8:35 pm

curious if there are any examples that fit within these motifs that actually are designed well or are appropriate to their organization’s stated goals.

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incandescere September 22, 2010 at 10:02 pm

Thank you. Some of these are actually truly fitting for their organizations and are well designed. If anything, this collection just implicates a lack of originality found in web design overall. M’eh.

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incandescere September 22, 2010 at 10:02 pm

Thank you. Some of these are actually truly fitting for their organizations and are well designed. If anything, this collection just implicates a lack of originality found in web design overall. M’eh.

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amandalbs September 22, 2010 at 8:35 pm

curious if there are any examples that fit within these motifs that actually are designed well or are appropriate to their organization’s stated goals.

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amandalbs September 22, 2010 at 8:35 pm

curious if there are any examples that fit within these motifs that actually are designed well or are appropriate to their organization’s stated goals.

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amandalbs September 22, 2010 at 4:35 pm

curious if there are any examples that fit within these motifs that actually are designed well or are appropriate to their organization’s stated goals.

Reply

incandescere September 22, 2010 at 6:02 pm

Thank you. Some of these are actually truly fitting for their organizations and are well designed. If anything, this collection just implicates a lack of originality found in web design overall. M’eh.

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AnnWithNoE September 22, 2010 at 8:39 pm

Wow, women sure do like to dance. And hold their arms up over their heads.

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AnnWithNoE September 22, 2010 at 4:39 pm

Wow, women sure do like to dance. And hold their arms up over their heads.

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AA September 22, 2010 at 9:36 pm

I would love to see a follow up depicting “good” logos or marks depicting women. What would the author (and/or commenters) like to see as an inclusive image that symbolizes women? What would this community design without the use of swooshes?

Very interesting image essay. It definitely gives the designers something to think about.. and a reminder to stretch themselves.

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AA September 22, 2010 at 9:36 pm

I would love to see a follow up depicting “good” logos or marks depicting women. What would the author (and/or commenters) like to see as an inclusive image that symbolizes women? What would this community design without the use of swooshes?

Very interesting image essay. It definitely gives the designers something to think about.. and a reminder to stretch themselves.

Reply

AA September 22, 2010 at 9:36 pm

I would love to see a follow up depicting “good” logos or marks depicting women. What would the author (and/or commenters) like to see as an inclusive image that symbolizes women? What would this community design without the use of swooshes?

Very interesting image essay. It definitely gives the designers something to think about.. and a reminder to stretch themselves.

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Tobiah September 23, 2010 at 3:25 pm

All these images remind me of stretching.

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Tobiah September 23, 2010 at 3:25 pm

All these images remind me of stretching.

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Tobiah September 23, 2010 at 3:25 pm

All these images remind me of stretching.

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Tobiah September 23, 2010 at 3:25 pm

All these images remind me of stretching.

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laguiri January 9, 2011 at 12:58 pm

The problem is not that the logos are bad or not inclusive. the problem is the lack of originality.

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AA September 22, 2010 at 5:36 pm

I would love to see a follow up depicting “good” logos or marks depicting women. What would the author (and/or commenters) like to see as an inclusive image that symbolizes women? What would this community design without the use of swooshes?

Very interesting image essay. It definitely gives the designers something to think about.. and a reminder to stretch themselves.

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Tobiah September 23, 2010 at 11:25 am

All these images remind me of stretching.

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Mike September 22, 2010 at 9:50 pm

I’d like to see where Wymen’s Ware (Vancouver toy store) fits in here!

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Mike September 22, 2010 at 9:50 pm

I’d like to see where Wymen’s Ware (Vancouver toy store) fits in here!

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Mike September 22, 2010 at 9:50 pm

I’d like to see where Wymen’s Ware (Vancouver toy store) fits in here!

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Mike September 22, 2010 at 9:50 pm

I’d like to see where Wymen’s Ware (Vancouver toy store) fits in here!

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Mike September 22, 2010 at 5:50 pm

I’d like to see where Wymen’s Ware (Vancouver toy store) fits in here!

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Wayfaring Wanderer September 22, 2010 at 10:12 pm

How that heck hasn’t anyone noticed this before?! haha Definitely eye-opening!

~WW

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Wayfaring Wanderer September 22, 2010 at 6:12 pm

How that heck hasn’t anyone noticed this before?! haha Definitely eye-opening!

~WW

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84chicseashells September 22, 2010 at 10:25 pm

How about we just stop using clipart and use real design for logos?

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AS September 23, 2010 at 2:30 pm

Haha – wouldn’t that be an amazing world?

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AS September 23, 2010 at 2:30 pm

Haha – wouldn’t that be an amazing world?

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AS September 23, 2010 at 2:30 pm

Haha – wouldn’t that be an amazing world?

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84chicseashells September 22, 2010 at 6:25 pm

How about we just stop using clipart and use real design for logos?

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AS September 23, 2010 at 10:30 am

Haha – wouldn’t that be an amazing world?

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GJane September 22, 2010 at 10:52 pm

Well it’s soooo easy to knock on logos you like. Saying crap is so easy out these days. If you think u are geniuses, then suggest a better way.

Just out of curiosity…what would you define as a successful logo for women?
I dare you to post them!

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GJane September 22, 2010 at 6:52 pm

Well it’s soooo easy to knock on logos you like. Saying crap is so easy out these days. If you think u are geniuses, then suggest a better way.

Just out of curiosity…what would you define as a successful logo for women?
I dare you to post them!

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Troy September 23, 2010 at 12:27 am

I fail to see any correlation

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Troy September 23, 2010 at 12:27 am

I fail to see any correlation

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Troy September 23, 2010 at 12:27 am

I fail to see any correlation

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Troy September 22, 2010 at 8:27 pm

I fail to see any correlation

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chelsed September 23, 2010 at 2:56 am

i actually worked as a designer for a women’s org and struggled with this. there really isnt a “hip” way to portray women. the bathroom women icon is patronizing; these abstract squiggles and spirals appeal to an audience of women i havent yet encountered; so i just used the general woman symbol–but even then i feel like it’s TOO gender segregated. the problem is men dont HAVE a gender. men’s football is football. men’s soccer is soccer, etc etc– they dont need distinction. what is the symbol for women NOW?

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J.B. September 23, 2010 at 4:37 am

As a general thought about design, the solution is probably to make a logo not to represent “women” but to represent the focus or purpose of the organization. Not that the design shouldn’t target women or be evocative of feminine qualities, but I think the point here is that these designers think “woman” and stop thinking.

Honestly, you could probably do a similar post about any number of groups dealing with the same demographic or cause (e.g., students, churches, immigration). Mediocre design isn’t generally about total lack of technical skill but lack of creativity and originality. People go with their first or second idea, which is the same first or second idea everyone has, resulting in a handful of variations. And cash-strapped non-profits are more likely to shop Logo-Mart than hire someone who provides focused branding services.

Also, one of these is the Tempur-Pedic logo, so there’s that.

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Melocoton September 23, 2010 at 9:45 pm

“the point here is that these designers think “woman” and stop thinking.”

Agreed. Which is why these dancing positivity squiggles strike me as so patronizing. In their way, more patronizing than the bathroom symbol because at least the bathroom lady isn’t pretending.

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Maggie September 29, 2010 at 2:56 am

Agreed, it can be a tough nut to crack to create a women’s logo without using pastels and soft lines. I haven’t worked for a women’s organization, but I do wonder, even if you have a designer that thinks outside the box, how many women’s organizations will go for an outside-the-box design? The pink and the swooshes may not scream “high design,” but there is a strong brand here. You wouldn’t look at any of these logos and think “is this a logo for a women’s organization or a corporate technology start-up/federal institution/higher education facility?”

But just typing that make me think that the problem is that the ideas of “women’s org” and, say, “higher education” are mutually exclusive… unless you put a little cap and gown on a swooshy lady, I guess.

It’s a conundrum!

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Maggie September 29, 2010 at 2:56 am

Agreed, it can be a tough nut to crack to create a women’s logo without using pastels and soft lines. I haven’t worked for a women’s organization, but I do wonder, even if you have a designer that thinks outside the box, how many women’s organizations will go for an outside-the-box design? The pink and the swooshes may not scream “high design,” but there is a strong brand here. You wouldn’t look at any of these logos and think “is this a logo for a women’s organization or a corporate technology start-up/federal institution/higher education facility?”

But just typing that make me think that the problem is that the ideas of “women’s org” and, say, “higher education” are mutually exclusive… unless you put a little cap and gown on a swooshy lady, I guess.

It’s a conundrum!

Reply

chelsed September 22, 2010 at 10:56 pm

i actually worked as a designer for a women’s org and struggled with this. there really isnt a “hip” way to portray women. the bathroom women icon is patronizing; these abstract squiggles and spirals appeal to an audience of women i havent yet encountered; so i just used the general woman symbol–but even then i feel like it’s TOO gender segregated. the problem is men dont HAVE a gender. men’s football is football. men’s soccer is soccer, etc etc– they dont need distinction. what is the symbol for women NOW?

Reply

J.B. September 23, 2010 at 12:37 am

As a general thought about design, the solution is probably to make a logo not to represent “women” but to represent the focus or purpose of the organization. Not that the design shouldn’t target women or be evocative of feminine qualities, but I think the point here is that these designers think “woman” and stop thinking.

Honestly, you could probably do a similar post about any number of groups dealing with the same demographic or cause (e.g., students, churches, immigration). Mediocre design isn’t generally about total lack of technical skill but lack of creativity and originality. People go with their first or second idea, which is the same first or second idea everyone has, resulting in a handful of variations. And cash-strapped non-profits are more likely to shop Logo-Mart than hire someone who provides focused branding services.

Also, one of these is the Tempur-Pedic logo, so there’s that.

Reply

Melocoton September 23, 2010 at 5:45 pm

“the point here is that these designers think “woman” and stop thinking.”

Agreed. Which is why these dancing positivity squiggles strike me as so patronizing. In their way, more patronizing than the bathroom symbol because at least the bathroom lady isn’t pretending.

Reply

Maggie September 28, 2010 at 10:56 pm

Agreed, it can be a tough nut to crack to create a women’s logo without using pastels and soft lines. I haven’t worked for a women’s organization, but I do wonder, even if you have a designer that thinks outside the box, how many women’s organizations will go for an outside-the-box design? The pink and the swooshes may not scream “high design,” but there is a strong brand here. You wouldn’t look at any of these logos and think “is this a logo for a women’s organization or a corporate technology start-up/federal institution/higher education facility?”

But just typing that make me think that the problem is that the ideas of “women’s org” and, say, “higher education” are mutually exclusive… unless you put a little cap and gown on a swooshy lady, I guess.

It’s a conundrum!

Reply

Anique Halliday September 23, 2010 at 4:28 am

Super fascinating! Thank you Shana for researching and compiling this essay. It’s disheartening to see so many women’s organizations using bland and less-than-innovative branding to promote their organizations and causes. I’ll say though, having worked with women’s orgs for years, that many of these groups have little to no funding to allocate to hire premium creative logo/branding designers and often rely either on pro-bono work or even the work of board members or staff.

This isn’t to say that pro-bono work is inherently less creative than paid work, but it’s often difficult for many women’s organizations to get amazing creative work that fits the budget. Hence we get redundant logos and even stock photos used for logos. It would be ideal if either women’s groups could get the funding to hire great branding experts or if more amazing creatives offered up a bit of their time to groups doing good work.

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Anique Halliday September 23, 2010 at 4:28 am

Super fascinating! Thank you Shana for researching and compiling this essay. It’s disheartening to see so many women’s organizations using bland and less-than-innovative branding to promote their organizations and causes. I’ll say though, having worked with women’s orgs for years, that many of these groups have little to no funding to allocate to hire premium creative logo/branding designers and often rely either on pro-bono work or even the work of board members or staff.

This isn’t to say that pro-bono work is inherently less creative than paid work, but it’s often difficult for many women’s organizations to get amazing creative work that fits the budget. Hence we get redundant logos and even stock photos used for logos. It would be ideal if either women’s groups could get the funding to hire great branding experts or if more amazing creatives offered up a bit of their time to groups doing good work.

Reply

Anique Halliday September 23, 2010 at 12:28 am

Super fascinating! Thank you Shana for researching and compiling this essay. It’s disheartening to see so many women’s organizations using bland and less-than-innovative branding to promote their organizations and causes. I’ll say though, having worked with women’s orgs for years, that many of these groups have little to no funding to allocate to hire premium creative logo/branding designers and often rely either on pro-bono work or even the work of board members or staff.

This isn’t to say that pro-bono work is inherently less creative than paid work, but it’s often difficult for many women’s organizations to get amazing creative work that fits the budget. Hence we get redundant logos and even stock photos used for logos. It would be ideal if either women’s groups could get the funding to hire great branding experts or if more amazing creatives offered up a bit of their time to groups doing good work.

Reply

bcr8tive September 23, 2010 at 5:40 am

I’m sorry to say that I did not recognize any of these organizations.

I do agree with Anique in that we can most likely assume that not a whole lot was budgeted for these to be created.

However what I also see here is that less experienced designers, found it easier to tag along on previously established logos, than to think outside of the box with an original, creative idea that demonstrates what the company is actually trying to convey. In other words, copying.

My suggestion? Stop looking at others work for inspiration and draw from your own creativity with your subject matter in mind. Stay away from “Googling” other logos. Payment aside, this should not be so apparent.

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bcr8tive September 23, 2010 at 5:40 am

I’m sorry to say that I did not recognize any of these organizations.

I do agree with Anique in that we can most likely assume that not a whole lot was budgeted for these to be created.

However what I also see here is that less experienced designers, found it easier to tag along on previously established logos, than to think outside of the box with an original, creative idea that demonstrates what the company is actually trying to convey. In other words, copying.

My suggestion? Stop looking at others work for inspiration and draw from your own creativity with your subject matter in mind. Stay away from “Googling” other logos. Payment aside, this should not be so apparent.

Reply

bcr8tive September 23, 2010 at 1:40 am

I’m sorry to say that I did not recognize any of these organizations.

I do agree with Anique in that we can most likely assume that not a whole lot was budgeted for these to be created.

However what I also see here is that less experienced designers, found it easier to tag along on previously established logos, than to think outside of the box with an original, creative idea that demonstrates what the company is actually trying to convey. In other words, copying.

My suggestion? Stop looking at others work for inspiration and draw from your own creativity with your subject matter in mind. Stay away from “Googling” other logos. Payment aside, this should not be so apparent.

Reply

AmazonaWomona September 23, 2010 at 5:44 am

This seems a little like seeing a rose for its thorns. I see lots of beautiful images on the Goddess! Did I miss something? How are squiggles depicting gender stereotypes? Is the Coca-Cola logo meant to appeal to women with its swoopy lines?

This post is missing something, an analysis as to why these images are bad. I don’t get a badness vibe here. I don’t get it.

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Shana Moulton September 23, 2010 at 3:15 pm

I never intended to make a judgement call here; by compiling these images in this post I didn’t mean to say they were necessarily bad or good. I just started to notice similarities and patterns in alot of women’s health/beauty/organization logos and wondered what they would look like removed from their context and grouped together in families. Personally I think alot of these images are beautiful too—some of them are absurd— alot of them are both repel and attract me. And I wondered if together they would become more than the sum of their parts. I didn’t want to pin down their potential meanings in a written analysis myself but I’m really glad it has sparked some discussion.

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AmazonaWomona September 23, 2010 at 5:44 am

This seems a little like seeing a rose for its thorns. I see lots of beautiful images on the Goddess! Did I miss something? How are squiggles depicting gender stereotypes? Is the Coca-Cola logo meant to appeal to women with its swoopy lines?

This post is missing something, an analysis as to why these images are bad. I don’t get a badness vibe here. I don’t get it.

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AmazonaWomona September 23, 2010 at 1:44 am

This seems a little like seeing a rose for its thorns. I see lots of beautiful images on the Goddess! Did I miss something? How are squiggles depicting gender stereotypes? Is the Coca-Cola logo meant to appeal to women with its swoopy lines?

This post is missing something, an analysis as to why these images are bad. I don’t get a badness vibe here. I don’t get it.

Reply

Shana Moulton September 23, 2010 at 11:15 am

I never intended to make a judgement call here; by compiling these images in this post I didn’t mean to say they were necessarily bad or good. I just started to notice similarities and patterns in alot of women’s health/beauty/organization logos and wondered what they would look like removed from their context and grouped together in families. Personally I think alot of these images are beautiful too—some of them are absurd— alot of them are both repel and attract me. And I wondered if together they would become more than the sum of their parts. I didn’t want to pin down their potential meanings in a written analysis myself but I’m really glad it has sparked some discussion.

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Amanda Piercy September 23, 2010 at 6:43 am

Very interesting. However, I do wonder how many logos for womens organizations you came across that did not fall into this stereotype.

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Amanda Piercy September 23, 2010 at 6:43 am

Very interesting. However, I do wonder how many logos for womens organizations you came across that did not fall into this stereotype.

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Amanda Piercy September 23, 2010 at 2:43 am

Very interesting. However, I do wonder how many logos for womens organizations you came across that did not fall into this stereotype.

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Meadow Braun September 23, 2010 at 12:02 pm

considering that designers work from the concept of an organization and its overall mission/audience, it’s not a surprise that most of these logos represent women (successfully or not). most of the organizations represent women or even explicitly mention women in their name. i think the essay gets at a larger and deeper issue which is that we even need organizations specifically targeted to, representative of, or in the service of women. whether their logo is a soccer ball, or a woman holding a soccer ball is besides the point. i’m with you chelsed… men’s soccer is “soccer.” my concern is not only how do we create good imagery to depict women, but how do we eliminate the need?

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Meadow Braun September 23, 2010 at 12:02 pm

considering that designers work from the concept of an organization and its overall mission/audience, it’s not a surprise that most of these logos represent women (successfully or not). most of the organizations represent women or even explicitly mention women in their name. i think the essay gets at a larger and deeper issue which is that we even need organizations specifically targeted to, representative of, or in the service of women. whether their logo is a soccer ball, or a woman holding a soccer ball is besides the point. i’m with you chelsed… men’s soccer is “soccer.” my concern is not only how do we create good imagery to depict women, but how do we eliminate the need?

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Meadow Braun September 23, 2010 at 8:02 am

considering that designers work from the concept of an organization and its overall mission/audience, it’s not a surprise that most of these logos represent women (successfully or not). most of the organizations represent women or even explicitly mention women in their name. i think the essay gets at a larger and deeper issue which is that we even need organizations specifically targeted to, representative of, or in the service of women. whether their logo is a soccer ball, or a woman holding a soccer ball is besides the point. i’m with you chelsed… men’s soccer is “soccer.” my concern is not only how do we create good imagery to depict women, but how do we eliminate the need?

Reply

Elizabeth September 23, 2010 at 2:21 pm

Just to play devil’s advocate, it seems that a logo looking the same as others isn’t necessarily a bad thing in some circumstances. If your goal is to build a national organization with a uniquely recognizable brand, then this is certainly not the way to go – but if you’re running a small, local organization (say, a maternity clinic or a shelter for abused women) then having your logo look like other women’s organizations’ logos may help people identify you as a women’s organization, too.

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Elizabeth September 23, 2010 at 2:21 pm

Just to play devil’s advocate, it seems that a logo looking the same as others isn’t necessarily a bad thing in some circumstances. If your goal is to build a national organization with a uniquely recognizable brand, then this is certainly not the way to go – but if you’re running a small, local organization (say, a maternity clinic or a shelter for abused women) then having your logo look like other women’s organizations’ logos may help people identify you as a women’s organization, too.

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Elizabeth September 23, 2010 at 10:21 am

Just to play devil’s advocate, it seems that a logo looking the same as others isn’t necessarily a bad thing in some circumstances. If your goal is to build a national organization with a uniquely recognizable brand, then this is certainly not the way to go – but if you’re running a small, local organization (say, a maternity clinic or a shelter for abused women) then having your logo look like other women’s organizations’ logos may help people identify you as a women’s organization, too.

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Ally September 23, 2010 at 8:13 pm

The problem with performing pro-bono work can often be the time factor. Everyone’s got to make a living. As a designer, I know that creating a truly good and original logo can eat up a lot of time. Thus the temptation will be to garnish existing ideas and alter, in cases where pro bono time will affect time for billable clients. Not making a judgement call on this strategy, its just a dose of reality.
Nice work on the collection- we’ve noticed this also but weren’t aware of the numbers of examples to be found.

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Ally September 23, 2010 at 4:13 pm

The problem with performing pro-bono work can often be the time factor. Everyone’s got to make a living. As a designer, I know that creating a truly good and original logo can eat up a lot of time. Thus the temptation will be to garnish existing ideas and alter, in cases where pro bono time will affect time for billable clients. Not making a judgement call on this strategy, its just a dose of reality.
Nice work on the collection- we’ve noticed this also but weren’t aware of the numbers of examples to be found.

Reply

Ollie September 23, 2010 at 9:07 pm

I think it could also be interesting to compare logo styles of today with logo styles of past eras (although I realize that the existence of women-focused groups and products has increased with time, so the amount of material for earlier eras could be much less). In what time frame (years) were these logos shown here created? Would a similar analysis of logos created in different time periods yield such a strong correlation as well? Upon comparing logo mods of different generations, is there a certain trend to be recognized as time progresses? All questions to the artist, and all others who may be interested in researching.

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Ollie September 23, 2010 at 5:07 pm

I think it could also be interesting to compare logo styles of today with logo styles of past eras (although I realize that the existence of women-focused groups and products has increased with time, so the amount of material for earlier eras could be much less). In what time frame (years) were these logos shown here created? Would a similar analysis of logos created in different time periods yield such a strong correlation as well? Upon comparing logo mods of different generations, is there a certain trend to be recognized as time progresses? All questions to the artist, and all others who may be interested in researching.

Reply

Zeynep Oguz-Bilimer September 24, 2010 at 2:37 am

I realized this while I was working on the branding of a genetic research laboratory, NDAL. I like to believe my woman+dna helix logo looks different from any of the above.

http://www.zeoist.com/work/?area=12&project=20

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Zeynep Oguz-Bilimer September 24, 2010 at 2:37 am

I realized this while I was working on the branding of a genetic research laboratory, NDAL. I like to believe my woman+dna helix logo looks different from any of the above.

http://www.zeoist.com/work/?area=12&project=20

Reply

Zeynep Oguz-Bilimer September 23, 2010 at 10:37 pm

I realized this while I was working on the branding of a genetic research laboratory, NDAL. I like to believe my woman+dna helix logo looks different from any of the above.

http://www.zeoist.com/work/?area=12&project=20

Reply

ryan September 24, 2010 at 4:17 am

1) pointy-limbed people
2) swooshes

I promise to never head down either of those paths.

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ryan September 24, 2010 at 4:17 am

1) pointy-limbed people
2) swooshes

I promise to never head down either of those paths.

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ryan September 24, 2010 at 12:17 am

1) pointy-limbed people
2) swooshes

I promise to never head down either of those paths.

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Kate Black September 24, 2010 at 1:36 pm

Can someone please pass the testosterone?

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Kate Black September 24, 2010 at 1:36 pm

Can someone please pass the testosterone?

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Kate Black September 24, 2010 at 9:36 am

Can someone please pass the testosterone?

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ccmorton September 24, 2010 at 1:46 pm

One more @ http://www.yogafit.com/, headed by a woman and serving mostly women.

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ccmorton September 24, 2010 at 9:46 am

One more @ http://www.yogafit.com/, headed by a woman and serving mostly women.

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tom moody September 24, 2010 at 2:33 pm

Fortunately this critique speaks more loudly than Shana Moulton’s attempt to back away from it by saying “I never intended to make a judgment call here; by compiling these images in this post I didn’t mean to say they were necessarily bad or good.”

If mediocre can be considered bad, these logos are mostly bad. A little testosterone might not hurt here, in the critical assertion department.

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tom moody September 24, 2010 at 2:33 pm

Fortunately this critique speaks more loudly than Shana Moulton’s attempt to back away from it by saying “I never intended to make a judgment call here; by compiling these images in this post I didn’t mean to say they were necessarily bad or good.”

If mediocre can be considered bad, these logos are mostly bad. A little testosterone might not hurt here, in the critical assertion department.

Reply

tom moody September 24, 2010 at 2:33 pm

Fortunately this critique speaks more loudly than Shana Moulton’s attempt to back away from it by saying “I never intended to make a judgment call here; by compiling these images in this post I didn’t mean to say they were necessarily bad or good.”

If mediocre can be considered bad, these logos are mostly bad. A little testosterone might not hurt here, in the critical assertion department.

Reply

tom moody September 24, 2010 at 10:33 am

Fortunately this critique speaks more loudly than Shana Moulton’s attempt to back away from it by saying “I never intended to make a judgment call here; by compiling these images in this post I didn’t mean to say they were necessarily bad or good.”

If mediocre can be considered bad, these logos are mostly bad. A little testosterone might not hurt here, in the critical assertion department.

Reply

James Kalm September 25, 2010 at 4:52 pm

Showing up late, but I get the benefit of this “focus group” that Mad Men would die for. Great work Shana, I’d love to see this research go into more specific information like: How many of these logos were designed by women? What sources were they cribbing their ideas from (I counted Matisse, Cycladic sculpture, Peter Max, the Three Graces and the Breast Cancer Ribbon, just to start.) Color choices (When did pastel become the sole realm of the feminine?) Sign, symbol, and text, which is more effective?
The responses have also bee enlightening, funny and frightening (A logo can be patronizing? Kinda like saying the letter M is overbearing.)
As someone whose worked in graphic design, it seems that the real questions weren’t even asked. But for fear of offending, I’ll keep those to my testosterone drenched self.

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James Kalm September 25, 2010 at 12:52 pm

Showing up late, but I get the benefit of this “focus group” that Mad Men would die for. Great work Shana, I’d love to see this research go into more specific information like: How many of these logos were designed by women? What sources were they cribbing their ideas from (I counted Matisse, Cycladic sculpture, Peter Max, the Three Graces and the Breast Cancer Ribbon, just to start.) Color choices (When did pastel become the sole realm of the feminine?) Sign, symbol, and text, which is more effective?
The responses have also bee enlightening, funny and frightening (A logo can be patronizing? Kinda like saying the letter M is overbearing.)
As someone whose worked in graphic design, it seems that the real questions weren’t even asked. But for fear of offending, I’ll keep those to my testosterone drenched self.

Reply

Julia September 26, 2010 at 7:55 am

Only a few of these pictures seem to be logos.

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Julia September 26, 2010 at 3:55 am

Only a few of these pictures seem to be logos.

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Maggie September 29, 2010 at 2:42 am

I like to think the swooshy ladies are all saying “Yeah!!” as they strike their poses, kind of the way Lil John says “yeah.” It’s funny!

Some of these are definitely better than others; for example, if the the teal swooshy lady near the top is for a Korean women’s organization, as I would surmise from the brush stroke quality and the shapes in general, it’s pretty clever. That said, it’s striking to see the similarities, and how many times we dip back to the same couple of wells (swooshy ladies, Girl Scout-like faces, the state of Nebraska etc.). I think I’ve noticed it subconsciously, but it’s fascinating to see it laid out like this, back to back to back to back… Nice essay. And thanks for letting us draw our own conclusions.

Reply

Maggie September 28, 2010 at 10:42 pm

I like to think the swooshy ladies are all saying “Yeah!!” as they strike their poses, kind of the way Lil John says “yeah.” It’s funny!

Some of these are definitely better than others; for example, if the the teal swooshy lady near the top is for a Korean women’s organization, as I would surmise from the brush stroke quality and the shapes in general, it’s pretty clever. That said, it’s striking to see the similarities, and how many times we dip back to the same couple of wells (swooshy ladies, Girl Scout-like faces, the state of Nebraska etc.). I think I’ve noticed it subconsciously, but it’s fascinating to see it laid out like this, back to back to back to back… Nice essay. And thanks for letting us draw our own conclusions.

Reply

PBS' To The Contrary January 6, 2011 at 5:36 pm

It seems those who have escaped using a swishy woman’s body just use words. The Girl Effect has a nice, simple, strong logo: http://www.girleffect.org/ Their entire campaign is well designed.

Reply

Ju Eiger November 24, 2011 at 8:17 am

WTF! I even saw a HENRI MATISSE collage!!  many of them aren’t logo!

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