Emails Reveal Guggenheim Bullies Journalist Suspected of Ties With Gulf Labor

by Paddy Johnson and Whitney Kimball on August 7, 2014 · 6 comments Newswire

Molly Crabapple

Molly Crabapple

On Monday, artist Molly Crabapple published “Slaves of Happiness Island,” a firsthand report of the slave-like worker conditions on Abu Dhabi’s Saadiyat Island; the Guggenheim, Louvre, and NYU are all building enormous new enterprises there. Crabapple’s reporting reveals some horrifying scenarios. She spoke with men who work seven days a week in blistering heat, shuttled between construction sites to high-security, prison-like camps where their passports are withheld so that they can’t escape. They work for as little as $176 a month, and the recruitment fees—an amount paid to an agency for finding the immigrant work based on a set salary—often take years to pay off because the promised rate is often much lower than what had been described. The initial fees are also supposed to be paid back to the workers. Nothing seems to lead to escape. “Hell is better than here,” Crabapple quotes one worker.

These conditions violate local and international labor laws. We have now received leaked email correspondence between the Guggenheim and Crabapple while she was working on this story. These emails reveal a shocking unwillingness to provide any statement to journalists who they speculate might be involved in any pro-worker activist efforts, such as Gulf Labor. Crabapple was never a member of this group. To our knowledge, this is the extent of their conversation.

questions

gulf-labor

no-gulf


no-source

interesting

no-refusal

answer

Notice that this final email from the Guggenheim does not answer Crabapple’s questions about whether workers will be paid a wage of $217 per month, if they will pay back workers recruitment fees, or how the Guggenheim distinguishes which workers they are responsible for. The response to these questions might be ugly, but they are not difficult to answer.  Surely the workers whose freedom, families, and labor are being exploited and withheld—all in the name of art—deserve a straight answer.

  • lubbactually

    When women run things, the world will be a kinder, gentler place.

    • strunken white

      not to be a jerk, but you do see that this is a correspondence between three women? Maybe that’s true, but this doesn’t seem to be an especially incisive moment to reflect on it

      • http://www.artfagcity.com Paddy Johnson

        Lol.

      • lil lub bites

        you’re not being a jerk! but I actually thought this moment is especially worth reflecting upon. it may not be persuasive but it is instructive.

    • Guest

      *slight* sarcasm…

  • http://mobius.org/artist/cathy-nolan arabylilac

    How horrible is this? Really horrible…

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