Posts tagged as:

gentrification

A People’s Monument to Anti-Displacement Organizing

by Betty Yu and Noah Fischer on April 18, 2016
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“Gentrification is displacement and replacement of people for profits”

-definition from the School of Echo Los Angeles

This definition of gentrification sits at the top of A People’s Monument to Anti-Displacement Organizing, a new collaboratively produced art piece that is viewable as a part of the Third Wave of the AgitProp! Show at the Brooklyn Museum. In the words of its curators, Agitprop! “connects contemporary art that advocates for social change with many activist movements throughout the 20th century,”

The Monument currently functions as a community educational board with a narrative that will change as actions or new information arises around Mayor de Blasio’s rezoning plans. It features a black-led activist group called Movement to Protect the People (MTOPP) that is struggling against rezoning in highlights in Crown Heights.

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An Artist’s Guide to the Democratic Primaries

by Michael Anthony Farley on April 8, 2016
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In this increasingly heated primary contest, two of the issues that impact our readers most haven’t exactly been hot-button topics. Candidates rarely discuss funding for the arts or affordable housing in the nation’s rapidly-gentrifying cities.

New Yorkers head to the polls Tuesday, April 19th, and the art school meccas of Providence, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New Haven will be casting their ballots one week later, on April 27th. The Democratic race for New York has been especially tense, with the April 14th debate at Brooklyn Navy Yard looming on the horizon. How in touch are the candidates with issues pertinent to our readers? For starters, neither one knows how to ride the subway. But both have been staunch advocates for the arts and make claims that they’ll tackle the nation’s affordable housing crisis. I’ve done some digging on how their records on those issues stack up.

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An Artist’s Guide to the Republican Primaries

by Michael Anthony Farley on April 8, 2016
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Just how bad would one of the Republican candidates be for the arts in America? Ahead of the upcoming New York primaries, I decided to find out. It’s looking pretty bleak in the GOP, but at least this race has been as surreal and entertaining as a Ryan Trecartin tribute to Hieronymus Bosch. Below, I’ve researched each of the candidates’ histories and policies on the arts and affordable housing. If I’ve missed something, feel free to contribute in the comments, but keep it a little more civil than a Trump rally.

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Can the Term “Gentrification” be Applied to the Internet?

by Rea McNamara on April 6, 2016
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On Monday, luxury lifestyle website Amuse published an interview with Petra Cortright, in which she used the term “gentrification” to describe how the internet is now less weird.

“I think the internet is becoming this really gentrified place,” the LA-based digital artist told writer Iona Goulder. “Today’s forms of social media feels more like people’s personal brands. Now it’s just people promoting their shit constantly and it makes stuff on the internet less weird. Everything feels more censored.”

Boosted by the interview’s SEO-driven headline — ”Petra Cortright on the Gentrification of the Internet” — the story circulated through my social feeds this week, eventually provoking a dust-up within some of my internet art circles. Cortright is among the increasing number of artists whose practices were shaped by the surf club era and who have gained bricks-and-mortar gallery representation and Rhizome cataloguing, so an overarching criticism of her statement stemmed from the perceived entitlement of an early internet user. There is an enduring fondness that borders on immaterial fetishization for a time when the internet was this unfettered, non-indexed boon of online amateur cultural production.

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