Post image for Artists Targeted in Exchange Traded Funds Advertorial

It’s not often a Canadian artist is featured in the business section of Canada’s top national paper, the Globe and Mail — especially in an advertorial promoting investment in exchange traded funds (ETFs).

ETFs are like mutual funds: so-called “baskets of securities” that enable you to diversify your holdings. The Financial Times has called ETFs the “phenomenon of the moment”: they are more “liquid” than mutual funds, and also cheaper, because they are tied to an index, making them ideal for beginner investors — like artists.

In this context, then, it might not seem so unusual that An Te Lu would be profiled in a printed half-page of “sponsored content” discussing his ETF-based portfolio.

Post image for PMF VII Weekend Highlights: The Fair

Open Space’s seventh annual Publications and Multiples Fair ran on Saturday and Sunday this past weekend at the Baltimore Design School. PMF is one of my all-time favorite art events—attracting DIY press, small publishers, artist-run spaces, and hundreds of artists working in a surprising variety of media. It’s free, most of the art is incredibly affordable, and the general vibe is somewhere between art fair and garage sale at a punk house.

The shear breadth of artists’ goods that one can actually buy is totally overwhelming—I’m sure I didn’t even see 60% of the highlights, but I snapped some photos of what caught my eye.

Post image for Geographically Indeterminate Fantasies: The Animated GIF as Place

Providence College—Galleries Launches Inaugural Online Exhibition
Geographically Indeterminate Fantasies: The Animated GIF as Place
Curated by Art F City critics Paddy Johnson, Michael Anthony Farley & Rea McNamara.

VIEW THE EXHIBITION: pcgalleries.providence.edu/GIF

As those subscribed to our mailing list will already know, today Providence College—Galleries launched its inaugural online exhibition “Geographically Indeterminate Fantasies: The Animated GIF as Place”. Curated by the Art F City team. Michael Anthony Farley, Paddy Johnson, and Rea McNarama, the show is the result of six months worth of planning, development and careful consideration. We are extremely proud of it.

Given that the press release has already gone out, we’re using the blog as the publishing platform for our curatorial essay. We hope it will give viewers a window into the sense of wonder we often have looking at these works.

Artists include: Peter Burr, Petra Cortright, Milton Melvin Croissant III, Elektra KB, Claire L Evans, Faith Holland, Dina Kelberman, Kidmograph (Gustavo Torres), Sara Ludy, Lauren Pelc-McArthur, Alex McLeod, Ying Miao, Jonathan Monaghan, Hugo Moreno, Brenna Murphy, Eva Papamargariti, Robby Rackleff, Sam Rolfes, Nicolas Sassoon, Jacolby Satterwhite,  Hito Steyerl, Tough Guy Mountain, Małgosia Woźnica (V5MT), Wickerham & Lomax, Clement Valla and Giselle Zatonyl.

Post image for An Artist’s Guide to the Democratic Primaries

In this increasingly heated primary contest, two of the issues that impact our readers most haven’t exactly been hot-button topics. Candidates rarely discuss funding for the arts or affordable housing in the nation’s rapidly-gentrifying cities.

New Yorkers head to the polls Tuesday, April 19th, and the art school meccas of Providence, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New Haven will be casting their ballots one week later, on April 27th. The Democratic race for New York has been especially tense, with the April 14th debate at Brooklyn Navy Yard looming on the horizon. How in touch are the candidates with issues pertinent to our readers? For starters, neither one knows how to ride the subway. But both have been staunch advocates for the arts and make claims that they’ll tackle the nation’s affordable housing crisis. I’ve done some digging on how their records on those issues stack up.