hump-day

Porntendo is maintained by an elusive figure who GIFs gay porn. Much of the archive features tags like “just bros being bros” (NSFW) or my personal favourite, “it’s a slow-burn fanfic.” Porntendo is especially thorough, even tagging GIFs based on their pixel-widths.

Of particular interest, however, are their growing collection of GIFs from old Bob Mizer softcore films. The queer pioneer basically invented “beefcake” photography, and seeing these GIFs is a Stonewall time capsule of joyful penis swinging.

Post image for DYNASTY HANDBAG: img mngmnt

Hello Fans and Fans I haven’t made yet,

Collage is one of my many talents, though I don’t use it. All of the images you see here were taken by professional photographers in order to promote my performance work. I hope you enjoy this portfolio, documenting my illustrious career as rubberband-bodied mind janitor.

Post image for Call for Submissions: We Are SO Not Getting the Security Deposit Back; a Guide to Defunct Artist-Run Spaces.

Look around the sanitized streets of any contemporary city, and there’s a secret, often subversive history at risk of being forgotten. What’s now the nanny’s room in Brownstone Brooklyn might’ve been a tiny gallery in a riotous punk house. An American Apparel could have once been home to a cooperatively-run storefront space. And undoubtedly, those renovated loft condos once housed artists’ exhibition and studio spaces. Our cities are elephant graveyards of generations’ of artist’s aspirations and hard work made temporarily tangible. We ought to remember the artist-run space.

Art F City is pleased to announce We Are SO Not Getting the Security Deposit Back: a Guide to Defunct Artist-Run Spaces, a series of zines and e-books documenting the often-forgotten places where art making and viewing once happened. We’ll be releasing editions specific to cities such as New York, Baltimore, Chicago, and beyond, but welcome submissions from anywhere. If you were once a proprietor of a now-defunct artist-run space, or know someone who was, drop us a line. Whether your blood, sweat, and tears are barely dry or have long ago been whitewashed over, we want to hear your story.

Post image for This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Old School Survival

Urban survival, whether it’s the cost of living in New York or even riding along Sag Habour in a self-sustaining houseboat, looms largely in this week’s events. Tonight’s lecture at the Morbid Anatomy Museum suggests that this dates back to Weimar Berlin’s era of anarchy and decadence, where fake fakirs — religious ascetics who live solely on alms — got by with their gnarly nails and pins piercing. Flash forward to Saturday’s MoMA opening of Nan Goldin’s famous 1986 visual diary “The Ballad of Sexual Dependency”, and those piercings became the battle scars of surviving the East Village’s punk bohemia. Today, we’re thankfully more practical in eking out our incomes: we look to the sun and its instruments (see this Thursday’s opening of the “Heliotropes” group show at Geary Contemporary) or envision terrible futures in our analogue pasts (“that old school dystopia” at Theodore:Art on Friday). But sustainability, if we quickly cut to the chase, really involves supporting each other, which is why this weekend’s workshops around the nuts and bolts of artist finances or even writing and editing an artist statement will get you ahead. No need for any physical scars.

Post image for .ART Re-Emerges as “The Art World’s Exclusive Domain”

Will the days of describing the internet as an ungentrified space finally be over? As the internet becomes an overcrowded domain space, ICANN’s new generic Top Level Domain (TLD) program is showing signs of an emerging virtual real estate boom—or at least that’s been the story for the last several years.

At the center of all this is .ART, which went live last week. The website, dotart.domains, comes less than a year after the widely-contested Top Level Domain (TLD) went to highest bidder UK Creative Ideas Limited. Judging by the art fair-esque logo and elevator pitch calling itself “the art world’s exclusive domain”, it seems the centralized online entity that is now .ART has truly been exploited by commercial interests.

Post image for 6 Recommendations for Storing File-Based Artworks

Editor’s Note: last month, we launched AFC Workshops: 21st Century Survival for Artists, a two-part series of courses led by artists, educators and art-world insiders designed to give artists the tools to get ahead. Due to the positive response to our May 21 workshops, we decided to run on the blog a series authored by the facilitators summarizing their course’s key takeaways. (If you’re interested, there are a few spots still available for our upcoming June 18 workshops.)

Next up, Anthony Antonellis, who led our “Best Practices: Digital Art Storage” course. Anthony is an artist based on the internet, whose practice involves various forms of net art and curating exhibitions in alternative spaces, such as the 1-kilobyte chip implanted in his hand. He lectures at SUNY Purchase College and is the creator of netartnet.net, an online-gallery listing and directory.