Post image for BHQF Announces MFU: Get Your Non-Degree for Free!

Bruce High Quality Foundation University (BHQFU) is our kind of institution. Who else would offer, MFU, a new year-long residency touted as a “DEBT-FREE AND DEGREE-FREE” program with a name that gives the traditional MFA the middle finger. And it’s a big one at that. The program offers 24/7 access to personal studios, a teaching curriculum in which artists design their own course to teach, and public programming opportunities. It’s the definition of self-guided education that avoids the homogenized product of MFA programs, while responding to the digital age. Today, countless virtual resources are at our finger tips, yet space and time often remain illusive.

Post image for This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Gatekeepers Be Damned

During this hallmark week in which we celebrate our love for our partners, what romance is the art world serving up? Nothing we’ve listed, save for an anti-gentrification protest at the Metropolitan Museum of Art this Valentine’s Day. In fact, it seems the entire week has been taken over by activists. From the Act Up—Dyke Action Machine talk at The 8th Floor to the Affordable Housing Show at Hunter, there’s plenty of discussion about how to make change.

Meanwhile, those with a sense of humor should balance all this seriousness out. Between Jayson Musson and Sean Patrick J Carney at SVA tonight to Larissa Valez-Jackson’s improv dance comedy at DANCEROULETTE this Thursday, you’ve got plenty of events to fill up your calendar.

Post image for Material Art Fair: The Most Important Art Event of the Year for Artists

For years we’ve sung the praises of NADA, an artist-centric fair that celebrates and works to commodify the strange, the creative and the wonder. In 2015, though, we began to question the model. Was NADA a bit stale compared to recent years? Was ARTIST RUN, a new fair that celebrates the DIY artist, closer to our interests?

These questions came up a lot yesterday at the Material Art Fair in Mexico City, which AFC staff writer Michael Anthony Farley described as a “great compromise between ARTIST RUN and NADA. Farley was referring to the structure of the fair, which invited more dealers than artists to participate, but retained the artistic energy and life essential to new art by keeping the booth prices low. It’s a great fair.

I agree the sentiment, but would put it a little differently: Material tells us that NADA can easily be replicated.